Overland News of the Week

USWE CORE 16 & 25-liter Dual Sport Daypack

USWE Sports is a Swedish backpack company that was founded by a group of dirtbike riders. Their idea was straightforward: design a backpack that doesn’t bounce around when you are participating in action sports, like riding dirtbikes, trail running, mountain biking, skiing, or anything else that involves motion. What they created was a unique suspension system that looks similar to a four-point harness crossed with a trail running vest. This “no dancing monkey” suspension, as they like to call it, has been integrated into all of their packs (and they make many different models).

The CORE 16 and 25-liter dual sport daypacks were designed for riders who need all-day comfort with the ability to carry hydration. They feature a cell phone pocket, five front-accessible webbing loops for securing a radio or LED light, two waist pockets for snacks or other small items, nine back webbing loops for additional lighting or gear, a goggle pocket, and armor carry attachment points. If you are looking for more hydration packs for riding, including others by USWE, check out this article by Heather Lea.

$239.95+ | USWE

 

Midland Micromobile Bundle MXT275VP4

Many folks are making the switch to GMRS radios in their rigs because of the advantages over CB radios including transmitting power, availability of repeaters, and transmission clarity, just to name a few. The Micromobile range of GMRS radios from Midland are worth considering if you are making the switch from CB or even just adding your first radio.

The MXT275VP4 is one of the tiniest in the lineup. By moving the LCD screen and buttons to the hand-held microphone, the main body of the unit has been reduced in size, and is not much bigger than a deck of playing cards. The MXT275 package comes from Midland with a 3dB gain ghost antenna, cables, and a roll bar mounting bracket.

$219.99 | Midland

 

Shwood Eyewear CAMP Collection

Shwood sunglasses are classy, with unique wooden inlays and timeless designs. Their new CAMP collection is made up of four different frame styles, all of which are made from cellulose-based acetate, an environmentally-friendly alternative to traditional petroleum-based plastics. All four feature TAC polarized lenses, stainless-steel spring hinges, and come with a sleeping bag-inspired travel case as well as a microfiber cleaning cloth. All Shwood eyewear is backed by a one year warranty.

$79 | Shwood

 

Good To-Go Meal Kits

Good To-Go makes top-notch freeze-dried trail meals (learn more about the company in this article). Between their use of high-quality ingredients and their dedication to developing recipes for people with dietary limitations (many gluten-free & vegan options), Good To-Go has been elevating our expectations of what convenient and nutritious meals in the backcountry can be.

Their new meal kits are a quick and easy way to stock up on a variety of entres for multi-day trips or preparedness kits. Their Summit meal kit starts at $73 and comes with two breakfasts as well as 8 single-serving entres. But if you need more food for the task at hand, the Thru-hiker kit is comprised of 30 single-serving meals totaling 18,500 calories and 580 grams of protein.

$73+ | Good To-Go

 

NOCS Provisions Zoom Tube Monocular

The NOCS Zoom Tube is not your standard monocular. It is IPX4-rated for water resistance, has a rubberized exterior to protect the internal components, and has a ¼-inch threaded attachment point that allows you to mount it on a tripod or use it with a Peak Design capture clip. The Zoom Tube can also be paired with the NOCS Inspector microscope, letting you magnify tiny subjects like insects or flowers. If you prefer to spot with both of your eyes, check out this field tested review of the NOCS 8×25 standard issue binoculars.

$75 | NOCS Provisions

 

K72 Rope Soft Shackles

For vehicle-based travelers, the importance of carrying recovery gear cannot be understated, especially if you find yourself venturing far off the beaten path where summoning help or assistance might not be an option. That’s where soft shackles from K72 Rope come into play. Soft shackles replace traditional metal shackles for winching operations and offer a whole bunch of advantages including lightweight construction, flexibility, and they don’t bind after being loaded. K72 Soft shackles have the following strength ratings: standard ⅜-inch @18,800 pounds, standard ½-inch @34,300 pounds, Mighty ⅜-inch @43,500 pounds, and Mighty ½-inch @62,500 pounds. As an added bonus, all K72 Rope soft shackles are manufactured in the USA.

$49.99+ | K72 Rope

 

Red Oxx Small Aviator Kit Bag

Red Oxx is well-known for its extremely burly yet simple duffles. Their Small Aviator Kit bag maintains this standard, with a single-compartment design made from 1000-denier Cordura that is sized for carry-on use. D-rings sewed to either side allow you to attach a shoulder strap to assist with carrying, and the whole bag is made by hand in Billings, Montana with USA-sourced materials.

$85 | Red Oxx

 

Mclean Metal Works Hammock Mount

 

Hammocks are a great way to relax, as long as you have some trees nearby. The problem is that not every great campsite has appropriately spaced (or any) trees. So what can be done? Mclean Metal Works has a solution: the Hammock Mount, a compact hitch-mounted frame that lets you set up and enjoy the comfort of a hammock, no trees required.

The Hammock Mount is made in the USA, weighs 38-pounds, fits all standard 2-inch receivers (class III & IV), can support up to 300 pounds, and is made from galvanized steel with black powder-coating. If you already own a hammock, take note that the Hammock Mount can accommodate a 114-inch or shorter hammocks.

$449 | Mclean Metal Works

When he's not publishing campervan content or gear reviews on ExPo, Matt Swartz is honing his paragliding skills, hiking a 14er, or exploring the backroads of Colorado. His love of travel has seen him bike across the United States, as well as explore more exotic destinations like the Amazon basin and Patagonia. Matt spent three years living in a 1964 RV with his partner, Amanda. He's worked as an Interpretive Ranger and Wildland Firefighter and his photography and writing has been published in Rova Magazine, the Leatherman blog, 'Hit The Road' by Gestalten Publishing, and Forbes.