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Claymore Ultra+2 Rechargeable Area Light | Field tested

This article was originally published in Overland Journal’s Summer 2020 issue. 

The business luminary Peter Drucker once said, “Don’t make a hundred decisions when one will do,” and that philosophy applies equally to overlanding. I have shifted my approach from highly specialized equipment to now looking for high-quality products that serve multiple uses, reducing weight, cost, and complexity. One great example of this is the BigTent Claymore Ultra+ 2 light.

This heavily armored model is IP65 rated and constructed to be durable above all else—I have dropped it more times than I would care to admit. It is about 5 inches square and just over 2 inches thick. The LED array has 30 bulbs that can be adjusted to three color temperatures. Light output is variable from 50 lumens to a full 2,200, easily illuminating a campground or tent interior; it can even be used as a reading light. The massive 23,200 mAh battery charges quickly, providing 15-150 hours of light. I use the available magnet and a RAM mount to attach the Ultra to the 1/4-20 UNC threaded holes on the frame, which permits connecting to a roof rack, roof tent rafter pole, and even my tripod. The light works for photo/video, too, and has the ability to charge your cell phone.

$149/EXTRA LARGE, $123/MEDIUM | BIGTENTOUTDOORS.COM


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Scott is the publisher and co-founder of Expedition Portal and Overland Journal. His travels by 4WD and adventure motorcycle span all seven continents and include three circumnavigations of the globe. His polar travels include two vehicle crossings of Antarctica and the first long-axis crossing of Greenland. He lives in Prescott, Arizona