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The Getaway Cabin Network is an Escape from the Urban Environment

Images courtesy of Getaway House

 

When you ask most people where their ideal getaway is, one common answer tends to be “a cabin in the woods.” And while some of you likely live in rural areas where forested escapes are a bit closer at hand, those of us who reside in more urban settings need our time in nature as well. Luckily for us, Getaway’s network of cabins offers a quick escape from many popular metropolitan areas, including Atlanta, Austin, San Antonio, Boston, Charlotte, Raleigh, Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles, New York, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Portland, and Washington D.C.

 

How Comfortable Can a Cabin Get?

While the term cabin might conjure rustic images in your mind, the Getaway cabins are a bit more modern than the log-hewn structures of yesteryear. They include the basic necessities for comfort as well as heat, air conditioning, a private bathroom, a kitchen with the basics, a queen-sized bed, and additional provisions available for purchase (just throw it on your tab).

As far as design goes, these cabins are more fashionable than frontier. Ranging in size from 140 to 200 square feet, they are modest but functional (think tiny house). The queen-sized beds come set up with fresh white linens and are always located near a large window, affording views of the surrounding environment. A mini-kitchen is outfitted with necessities such as pots and pans, a mini-refrigerator, a stove, salt, pepper, and cooking oil. And while you will want to bring food along on your journey, a provision box with additional food can be purchased before your reservation or while onsite for an additional $30—convenient if you happen to pack light and find yourself needing additional rations.

Finally, a tiny bathroom has a shower and toilet so you can take care of your needs. Biodegradable shampoo, conditioner, and body wash are provided as well as towels.

Explore by Day

While these cute little outposts are so comfortable that you’ll probably sleep in, the real reason you book a cabin in the woods is to enjoy the outdoors, right? Each location has multiple cabins but promises a degree of privacy (word has it you might spot your neighbors through the trees). Each cabin has a private fire pit with a grilling grate, outdoor picnic table, and chairs. There’s also firewood available for purchase.

If you are looking for off-site outdoor activities, options abound. A little bit of exploring on the Getaway website (click through the different locations) will provide suggestions for nearby outings to entertain adults as well as kids, and all offer directions.

 

Something a Little Bit Different

With a little bit of research, it becomes clear that the owners of Getaway are offering something a little more involved than simple short-term rentals: the importance of getting out into the woods and unplugging from technology to recharge the soul is paramount. They have created a podcast that focuses on three areas, including city+nature, technology+disconnection, and work+leisure.

Getaway also goes out of its way to make stays more accessible to healthcare professionals, veterans, and first responders, offering all three groups 15% off bookings (students too). They even have an artist fellowship application (apply here) that grants selected applicants a free night’s stay.

 

Learn more about the Getaway cabins network and book your stay here.

 

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When he's not publishing campervan content or gear reviews on ExPo, Matt Swartz is honing his paragliding skills, hiking a 14er, or exploring the backroads of Colorado. His love of travel has seen him bike across the United States, as well as explore more exotic destinations like the Amazon basin and Patagonia. Matt spent three years living in a 1964 RV with his partner, Amanda. He's worked as an Interpretive Ranger and Wildland Firefighter and his photography and writing has been published in Rova Magazine, the Leatherman blog, 'Hit The Road' by Gestalten Publishing, and Forbes.