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News: Feniex Releases AI Lightbars

Up until recently, Feniex has been almost unheard of in the civilian world of lighting. The small, Austin-based company was established in 2010 and has been hard at work trying to brighten the space around our first responders, keeping them safe on duty. Now, after honing their designs and engineering over the last 7 years, they’ve finally turned their attention to the off-road world, making a huge entrance with an all-new product line. It’s called the AI Series, and while these light bars might almost look normal, they can produce up to 50,000 lumens each.

What really makes them special is the missile-grade GPS that allows the operator of the lightbar to change beam patterns automatically and almost instantly. This is all controlled via a small dash-mounted system that will also let you dim and adjust the lights in full manual mode. Feniex designed the beam patterns to range from a 60-degree flood light all the way down to a 10-degree spot pattern intended to keep you safe during high-speed driving.

While there are certainly other lights on the market with similar features, it’s refreshing to see a smaller company going after the big kids on the block, especially with a U.S.- made product. Full details on the new lights will be released on October 31, and we can hardly wait to see them on the trail. 

For more information, check out www.feniex.com    

Growing up on a used-car lot in Prescott, Arizona, Chris Ramm developed a passion for automobiles at a very early age. While most children had treehouses, he played in a 1960 Ford Sunliner convertible which quickly became his first project car. As soon as he received his driver’s license, Chris frequently found himself driving across state lines for something as small as an ice cream cone or slice of pizza. When he bought his first 4wd vehicle, a 1998 Jeep Cherokee, he started exploring the numerous trails in the southwest and hasn’t stopped yet. When you can’t reach Chris on his cell phone, it is safe to assume he is out in the forest finding new trees to hang a hammock between and enjoying a local brew.