Xpedition Camper out of Minnesota

Hoefler

Supporting Sponsor: Haf Xpedition Camper
Body gets pre-fit before painting. Frame gets finished in white urethane. Body panels get an anodizing treatment.
We test out the three-point sub frame in our loading dock area. Nice movement without any frame stress.
Pete
 

Attachments

Hoefler

Supporting Sponsor: Haf Xpedition Camper
Frame gets painted along with installation of anodized side wall panels. External hinged doors protect body and allow for carrying outside items...on the outside of shell. Thinks like rope, traction matts and gear can be neatly tucked away on outside.
Pete
 

Attachments

Last edited:

zracer

Banned
Been dreaming about one of these. A couple months ago at Lake Isabella, winds were hitting 80 MPH. This unit you have here would give me peace of mind when the winds start up. How much snow can the roof hold with all the fixings already mounted (solar panels and A/C)?

I like your choice for the prototype rig/platform. Chevy sold me with their propaganda. Check out the frame twist demo starting at 0:44 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZMBIuaXL2U
 

adam88

Explorer
Been dreaming about one of these. A couple months ago at Lake Isabella, winds were hitting 80 MPH. This unit you have here would give me peace of mind when the winds start up. How much snow can the roof hold with all the fixings already mounted (solar panels and A/C)?

I like your choice for the prototype rig/platform. Chevy sold me with their propaganda. Check out the frame twist demo starting at 0:44 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZMBIuaXL2U
Propaganda indeed. Chevy has been using this test for years to try and "brain wash" the "unwashed masses" into believing that a rigid frame is better. Here's a video from 5 years ago (2011) when they claimed the same thing. No one cared back then, and 5 years later no one still cares: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKMQjm7i2Jw

Thing is... frame twist is something you actually want in a truck. It keeps the tires on the ground, keeps traction in rough situations, and prevents damage to the frame. You don't want a rigid frame when doing things like snow plowing. How many chevy's you see plowing snow? Hardly any. The frames CRACK big time on the chevy's (and dodge too). Also, how many millions of trucks have been sold by Ford and how many cracked or broken frames, or even cracked beds, do you hear of. Finally, no moron would ever park their truck on terrain like that or try to unload stuff. And honestly, I don't even know if chevy could reach terrain that rough. Would probably crack their frame down before it got there especially if the truck bed was loaded with heavy stuff.
 

Hoefler

Supporting Sponsor: Haf Xpedition Camper
The roof is one piece 1/4" aluminum with girts welded underneath. You can walk on it, but its a little crowded with all the panels.
On the frame flex, our three point mount works great. Look close at the frame twist picture above and how the sub frame handles it. The front of the three point is secured to the truck frame with four compression springs. The front springs allow the sub frame to work independent of truck frame in extreme twist situations.
Pete
 

zracer

Banned
Propaganda indeed. Chevy has been using this test for years to try and "brain wash" the "unwashed masses" into believing that a rigid frame is better. Here's a video from 5 years ago (2011) when they claimed the same thing. No one cared back then, and 5 years later no one still cares: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKMQjm7i2Jw

Thing is... frame twist is something you actually want in a truck. It keeps the tires on the ground, keeps traction in rough situations, and prevents damage to the frame. You don't want a rigid frame when doing things like snow plowing. How many chevy's you see plowing snow? Hardly any. The frames CRACK big time on the chevy's (and dodge too). Also, how many millions of trucks have been sold by Ford and how many cracked or broken frames, or even cracked beds, do you hear of. Finally, no moron would ever park their truck on terrain like that or try to unload stuff. And honestly, I don't even know if chevy could reach terrain that rough. Would probably crack their frame down before it got there especially if the truck bed was loaded with heavy stuff.
The Ford in that video didn't fair to well with a dented tailgate. The 2005 Chevy Silverado I bought back in the day brand new had similar problems. I drove on a forest road to a campground and the bed hit the rear of the cab on one side making a small 1"-2" dent area. The truck was a long bed, ext. cab, 4X4 (496CI/Allison). The extra cab door and front door slightly bent at the top bumping into each other. Taking a line on that forest road was easy, never had to get out and analyze a line to take. It was surprising to see damage when giving it a washing after getting back home. Couldn't believe it and took time trying to figure how in the hell that could have ever happened.
 

adam88

Explorer
800 watts of solar gets installed along with air conditioner, skylight and fan. Laser cut holes with radiuses corners provide a perfect location and fit.
The air conditioner is located in the rear right above the sleeping area.
Pete
Those look like the nice new 100w Renogy Eclipse solar panels
 

Hoefler

Supporting Sponsor: Haf Xpedition Camper
Yep, they are the new style Renogy units. They are a bit heavier than the old ones and have a carbonized glass cover. The new controller they have out is more substantial than the old one. This set up is going to produce a bit of electricity.
Pete
 

Hoefler

Supporting Sponsor: Haf Xpedition Camper
sub frame 1.jpgsub frame 2.jpgsub frame 3.jpgsub frame 4.jpgweb5.jpg3-Point mount gets finished and tested. Lots of frame flex here with zero forces transfered to sub frame. We have 10 degrees of flex engineered in with maximum frame flex at about 8 degrees. No measurable forces up front at the spring mount.
The Silverado comes with four 1/2" drilled and tapped holes in top of frame right behind cab. The holes are mounted on a frame perch that is perfectly suited for a sub-frame like this.
The entire frame is continuously welded with top ground flush. We then galvanize the frame both inside and outside.
Pete
 

Hoefler

Supporting Sponsor: Haf Xpedition Camper
Interior build out begins. We are lining the walls with clear anodized aluminum-1/8" thick for durability. With wall thickness we are able to securely mount items to walls with bolts (not screws). Our cabinetry is constructed of King Starwood. Our shower enclosure is a one piece self contained aluminum enclosure with fully welded floor and corners. The result is a fully hygenic interior that is easy to keep clean.
Pete
 

Attachments

Top