Who ordered a New Defender ?

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blackangie

Well-known member
My point mainly is that the Defender was the last true off road vehicle LR made and now the new replacement will have no appeal to the commercial user,
and how good will the engines be,the 4l V8 was a gem but since then there seems to be a major problem with the newer models.But the Evoque had a Ford Transit deisel in it,worked well in the tranny but not in the RR.
Currently I run two RR P38s with 4L V8 and a TD5 Disco 2 and would not change the despite the dodgy electrics.
They are selling a commercial version specifically for commercial buyers

New defender being ip67 rated and properly tested, upgradable, won't have dodgy electrics, those days are long gone.

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Christian P.

Expedition Leader
Staff member
Nothing like the owner of two P38s telling us how the newer rovers are unreliable and how they want a Series...

Why is this still going on? Why can't we just discuss the new truck? I really expected more from Expo.
I can't win at this. If I delete the troll(s)/irrelevant comment(s) I am being accused of being too strict, if I let them flow then the thread becomes a circus.

So let's try this one more time,. Please stay on the "Who ordered a Defender" topic, any sort of comparison with Toyota/Jeep will be deleted without further explanation.
Also please refrain from saying that you don't like the new Defender for X or Y reason. There is another thread with 80 pages that covered it all.
 

blackangie

Well-known member
Most people are reasonable and stick to the facts imo, others either dont know the facts, don't want to believe them or trolling.

In the last 20 years landrovers reliability increased 180% according to jdpower. Fact.

Anyone with a newish JLR vehicle knows they are chalk n cheese from p38 days.

Agreed, lets move on.


Edit, looks like we posted at same time
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catmann

Member
"Designed to prevent luggage or other items stored in the loadspace from entering the passenger compartments". I am thinking my dogs and their slobber fall under the "other items" category. :)

The net would probably keep more dog hair in the rear (prevent it from blowing upfront), but the main metal one probably lets more air flow back there. I need to see how well the rear vents work to know which would be the better option...
 

DieselRanger

Well-known member
What dealer is this?
Red Noland Jaguar Land Rover in Colorado Springs.

Talked to the sales manager while I was picking up my D5 from its 32k service. The Rocky Mountain region has its own manufacturer rep...they got an early Disco for a week or two, as well as an I-Pace before they were released.

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DieselRanger

Well-known member
I can't win at this. If I delete the troll(s)/irrelevant comment(s) I am being accused of being too strict, if I let them flow then the thread becomes a circus.

So let's try this one more time,. Please stay on the "Who ordered a Defender" topic, any sort of comparison with Toyota/Jeep will be deleted without further explanation.
Also please refrain from saying that you don't like the new Defender for X or Y reason. There is another thread with 80 pages that covered it all.
THANK YOU.

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DieselRanger

Well-known member
On the subject of ordering, which would you chose and why?


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If the purpose is to secure a load during overlanding, I would choose the cage vs the screen, only because I feel like it would prevent stored objects intruding into the passenger cabin better in the event of an incident like a rollover. I think you'd also be able to 'biner another load retention net or something to the metal.

I'd actually prefer an aircraft-grade cargo net partition...would look awesome, be functional, and perhaps a bit lighter than a steel or aluminum cage.

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While staying on topic, I want to discuss options. What is everyone's opinion of the flared wheel arch protection? Very LR3-esque, but I unfortunately think it ruins the side profile. The wheels wind up too far sunken into the arches. Thoughts?
 

mpinco

Expedition Leader
...........New defender being ip67 rated and properly tested, upgradable, won't have dodgy electrics, those days are long gone.
IP67 is a cable and enclosure spec, not a total system spec. While it will help with connectors, the control systems themselves are still industry standard manufacturing. Let's not overstate the effects of IP67.
 

DieselRanger

Well-known member
While staying on topic, I want to discuss options. What is everyone's opinion of the flared wheel arch protection? Very LR3-esque, but I unfortunately think it ruins the side profile. The wheels wind up too far sunken into the arches. Thoughts?
I actually like them, especially with the factory soft mud flaps. If indeed 35" tires can be accommodated after a lift, then I think the extra flares will help, especially if you add spacers. Since I went to 275/55-20's on my D5 I kick up a lot more stuff being a bit wider than the stock 255/55's, so it might help to keep the paint and/or wrap immediately behind the wheels in decent shape.
 

DieselRanger

Well-known member
IP67 is a cable and enclosure spec, not a total system spec. While it will help with connectors, the control systems themselves are still industry standard manufacturing. Let's not overstate the effects of IP67.
IP67 can be applied at the board level as well as the enclosure level if the enclosure is specified at the board - i.e., shrink-wrapping an individual module. Stuff we build for UAS's are fully encased in epoxy resin inside their metal enclosure, so it's not that hard to do - you just have to specify the replaceable unit as the board or module that's enclosed. This does drive up cost, but if the reliability is higher it all evens out.

Recall the D5 was submerged in 930mm of fresh water with the doors opened for one hour (i.e., the cabin was flooded), and then started and driven out of the pool. It's rated for wading to 900mm like the Defender.
 

mpinco

Expedition Leader
....... Stuff we build for UAS's are fully encased in epoxy resin inside their metal enclosure, so it's not that hard to do - you just have to specify the replaceable unit as the board or module that's enclosed. ........
I get the extent of IP67 and agree that it could be extended to the enclosure if needed. I guess International Harvester could have classified the 'gold box' ignition module as IP67 back in the 70's. It was a stamped metal enclosure potted with epoxy. Let's call it the 'ECU' !

I always carried a spare 'gold box'.

I'm not anti-technology per se. It can improve the overall system performance and if done right can be SOTA updated. If done wrong you can brick the system. This is a time of significant transformation for the entire auto industry as they move from mechanical to control systems and new powertrains. I read the other day that JLR is downsizing mechanical and heavily investing in IT. The Luxury Defender is an example of that trajectory. Consider it the alpha phase of a long term investment strategy. Personally I think they are leaving their customer base and hoping for new adopters. As one article noted, paraphrase - "How do they keep their customers and regulators happy at the same time?".
 

mpinco

Expedition Leader
The more I think about it the real question in front of JLR, given their large investment in control systems and IT, is how do they enable the owner to maintain their vehicle for a decade or more? Trips to the dealer are NOT considered 'support'. Neither are SOTA updates. When something fails what tools do I have to troubleshoot, isolate and repair my Luxury Defender? What is their strategy for those times the vehicle has zero cell or wifi service (which in the Intermountain West can be a significant area )
 
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