Waxy contaminant in propane line

WOODY2

Adventurer
Again, that is only needed when using cheap hoses, the chemical breakdown in use produces the goop that needs filtering.

Using copper, or the more expensive teflon-lined hoses, eliminates the need for those filters.
What % of hoses sold in US are classified 'cheap'? I've yet to see anyone running copper from gas bottle to camping stove. It's good to know that there is a superior grade of hose to seek out, thanks.
 

perterra

Adventurer
Just to give an update on this.... I've been trying to run the tank down as much as I can with the plan to have the propane place pull the valve and inspect when it's empty. I've hooked this tank to the skottle a number of times with no issues but that burner may be less particular on fuel. I ran it on my cookpartner every morning for a week when our hot water heater was broken in the house. It still just didn't seem to be running full power but I haven't gotten any globs of goop lately. I eventually ordered a new hose ~$35 and it came in last week. I used a bore scope from work to inspect down inside the old hose and the new hose with not much difference. I can see areas where the residue has settled on the inside of the old hose but it just looks like it's sitting there and didn't originate from there. I was unable to use my camera to capture this due to the eyepiece.

I'm headed out into the woods this weekend. Not sure if I'll use the stove or not but will continue to use the tank till it's empty.

Your skottle is pulling a lot less fuel than the Partner. You picking up liquid from the cylinder. A 10 lb jug isnt able to pull much gas off before sucking liquid in to it.

The Partner is pulling a higher flow. It's the reason you see some torches (or heaters) state only suitable for 100 lb cylinders.
 

perterra

Adventurer
Again, that is only needed when using cheap hoses, the chemical breakdown in use produces the goop that needs filtering.

Using copper, or the more expensive teflon-lined hoses, eliminates the need for those filters.
It can be with any hose if the flow is high enough. You still can pick it up in your regulation equipment
 

perterra

Adventurer
All natural gases have impurity limits. These impurity limits are usually dictated by the gas plant’s sales contracts. Most consumer grade propane is only 90% propane, 5% propylene and has a 5% impurity allowance. Most refiners take full advantage of that 5% impurity allowance. More than likely your tank was filled when the suppliers tank was near empty and you got the residual impurities.
Your refrigerant grade propanes are very highly refined as per oils and moisture.
 

john61ct

Adventurer
What % of hoses sold in US are classified 'cheap'?
Likely 99.99%

Why?

The issue here is a very common one.

> I've yet to see anyone running copper from gas bottle to camping stove.

Really?

For a non-portable installation, would IMO be silly to do anything else, I only use rubber hoses where frequent movement requires one.

They need to be checked / tested / replaced much more frequently if you want to be safe.
 

AC Tundra

New member
Paraffins are heavy hydrocarbon chains, (C30 to C40) that are entrained in “wet” natural gases. They usually have a melting point between 100*f to 160*f; which is why I recommended the boiling water earlier. Without knowing where the gas originated from, the refining processes used and the process conditions it is nearly impossible to tell you what paraffin chain this is without doing some gas absorption chromography testing which is not worth it for a $65 hose/regulator setup. My guess is that the pressure drop across the regulator/orifice is to high at low ambient temperatures which is causing the paraffin to “dropout” of the gas and clog up your stove. If you have low pressure gauges available to you, you may try checking your regulator outlet pressure. Low pressure propane systems usually operate around 10-11 in-wc while high pressure propane burners are set between 10 to 20 psi but can be as high as 60 psi. I’m not sure about the OPs stove set points but it can make a huge difference in performance.

Perterra is correct in that refrigerant grade propane is much more pure starting at 98% pure propane and going up to 99.5%. There maybe higher quality propane refrigerant available, but it would be rare and for special purposes.
 

WOODY2

Adventurer
Likely 99.99%

Why?

The issue here is a very common one.

> I've yet to see anyone running copper from gas bottle to camping stove.

Really?

For a non-portable installation, would IMO be silly to do anything else, I only use rubber hoses where frequent movement requires one.

They need to be checked / tested / replaced much more frequently if you want to be safe.
Not to prolong this thread but isn't the very nature of off/roading- overlanding portable? The units that use bottles to a small hard tube are the exception. I'm glad that you pointed out the lined lines and I will endeavor to locate some. Thanks.
 

john61ct

Adventurer
A stove and bottle mounted "permanently in the kitchen" of a mobile living space

is very different from a little rig designed to pop out onto the picnic table or even more so

to pack on a hike or trip to the beach.

A rubber hose would be IMO only well suited for the second scenario.

Personally my catering Iwatani is what I use for both of the last two

plus a micro campstove for real hiking and redundancy.
 

WOODY2

Adventurer
A stove and bottle mounted "permanently in the kitchen" of a mobile living space

is very different from a little rig designed to pop out onto the picnic table or even more so

to pack on a hike or trip to the beach.

A rubber hose would be IMO only well suited for the second scenario.

Personally my catering Iwatani is what I use for both of the last two

plus a micro campstove for real hiking and redundancy.
That's ironic I use a similar setup with a hose and adapter for propane backup.
 

john61ct

Adventurer
Yes butane and propane can easily be substituted, once you find the adapter fittings.

Silly paying a buck per can if you don't actually need the self-contained portability.
 

WOODY2

Adventurer
Yes butane and propane can easily be substituted, once you find the adapter fittings.

Silly paying a buck per can if you don't actually need the self-contained portability.
The Gas One model I bought came with the adapter for 1 lb. cans and I also obtained an adapter to get from 1lb to larger cyls. I, like Herbie, can adapt and improvise to meet the circumstances.
 

Mdmeltdown

New member
Sounds like the biggest variable to eliminate at this point is a flashlight shot looking inside that tank with the valve taken out
 
Top