(USA) panel options Total Composites or GXV DIY Adventure Kits

ExpoMike

Well-known member
If we go reverse = approach. If you spell check - deproach doesnt exist. And we don't want to reproach. Ironically this was a discussion between marketing and engineering. So, you pick (insert smiley face here). Regardless, gives us more clearance.
Just for reference, this rear angle is commonly called Departure Angle. That
 

Alloy

Well-known member
So, I pitched my design ideas and market opportunities to a few engineering friends and we set out to build and design our own solution, and filling in all the gaps. And with our supply chain relationships and connections, we were able to source right here on the West Coast.
With one wheel up on the concrete it appears as if (13:35 in the video) there is torsion in the base frame that wouldn't do the box any good.

Why isn't it galvanized?


snapshot.jpg

 
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rruff

Explorer
With one wheel up on the concrete it appears as if (13:35 in the video) there is torsion in the base frame that wouldn't do the box any good.
Looks flat to me. Perspective; the rear part of the bed is much closer to the camera so there will appear to be a higher rise across.
 

Alloy

Well-known member
Looks flat to me. Perspective; the rear part of the bed is much closer to the camera so there will appear to be a higher rise across.
Open a door and look at if from the side. If it's flat it won't matter what way youy look at it.
 

rruff

Explorer
Open a door and look at if from the side. If it's flat it won't matter what way youy look at it.
Same thing. In order to eyeball flatness accurately, your eye needs to be in the same plane relative to some part of the bed; then you can see if it's out even a little by looking at the rest. In that video they are always above the plane, so I don't know how you are spotting an issue. Looks flat to me.
 

Alloy

Well-known member
Same thing. In order to eyeball flatness accurately, your eye needs to be in the same plane relative to some part of the bed; then you can see if it's out even a little by looking at the rest. In that video they are always above the plane, so I don't know how you are spotting an issue. Looks flat to me.
As your eye gets close to the plane it is possible to see what is out of alignment. To my eye the back far side corner is higher.
 

rruff

Explorer
As your eye gets close to the plane it is possible to see what is out of alignment. To my eye the back far side corner is higher.
That's exactly what the you'd expect on a flat surface from the camera's perspective. The back corners are closer, so it looks like a bigger delta. The front corners are farther away so it looks smaller. If you dropped the camera an inch or two, I think both ends would be level or really close.
 

Alloy

Well-known member
That's exactly what the you'd expect on a flat surface from the camera's perspective. The back corners are closer, so it looks like a bigger delta. The front corners are farther away so it looks smaller. If you dropped the camera an inch or two, I think both ends would be level or really close.
I've probably built over 200 frames this size and larger which we'd eyeball (your eye doesn't lie) before welding. The other thing that tells me it's not staying flat is there is no pipe or HSS to resist torsion.

If you can take a picture of something to demonstrate what you are saying.
 

boogie944

New member
With one wheel up on the concrete it appears as if (13:35 in the video) there is torsion in the base frame that wouldn't do the box any good.



It is normal the base frame itself without the box on top will display some torsion. This base frame steel structure by itselfhas no torsional stiffness properties whatsoever and it is also not required. This stiffness all needs to come from whatever you place on top.
 

Alloy

Well-known member
It is normal the base frame itself without the box on top will display some torsion. This base frame steel structure by itselfhas no torsional stiffness properties whatsoever and it is also not required. This stiffness all needs to come from whatever you place on top.
I don't agree. The base frame should minimize the torsion introduced into what is on top of it.
 

Alloy

Well-known member
The outside edges look to be parallel and drop off at the 111.79" dimension but that's due to computer graphics. I did something similar but I need to update the graphic card drivers to post the images.
 

rruff

Explorer
It is normal the base frame itself without the box on top will display some torsion. This base frame steel structure by itselfhas no torsional stiffness properties whatsoever and it is also not required. This stiffness all needs to come from whatever you place on top.
I thought the whole point of the subframe was to provide a stiff platform to mount the box to? The stiffest member is the one that takes the bulk of the load.

If the box is strong enough to take the load then you can remove the subframe and just provide reinforced mounting points between the frame and box. In your 3 point design, this means that 3 locations need reinforcement, and you can ditch the rest of the subframe. Seems like it would be more weight efficient.
 

Alloy

Well-known member
If the box is strong enough to take the load then you can remove the subframe and just provide reinforced mounting points between the frame and box. In your 3 point design, this means that 3 locations need reinforcement, and you can ditch the rest of the subframe. Seems like it would be more weight efficient.
You'll see sub frames incorporated into the floor. It reduces the OA height but there is allot more thermal transfer.
 
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