Suggestions requested

shade

Well-known member
I think the air horn is a neat idea over the bear bangers though. When I set mine off the bear was so close I ended up firing 2 straight up in the air. Had I shot them in the bears direction it would have exploded behind the bear. Something to think about.
I've never used them, but that's an excellent point. Thanks for mentioning it.
 
Folks, request that we keep this thread focused on making firearm recommendations for us? I have decided to get one and now need to focus on picking out one. Prefer if we don't start going on tangents regarding guns vs. no guns.

I also appreciate the advice on the bear bangers, bear horn, bear spray, camp cleanliness, food safety, etc, so please keep those coming.

Thanks.
 

NoDak

Member
Shade. Your entire post #16, was pot stirring. Don't bother responding again.

Back on topic. Unless something has changed recently you can bring a shotgun into Canada for defense against bears. Some places the local Canadian authority won't let you venture out without a long gun. Bear spray is pretty useless. A good friend of mine that was a hunting guide for many years only carried bear spray because they were required to but their experience was that it didn't work. They always has a 12 gauge or 45-70 around.
 

shade

Well-known member
When I mentioned not eating where you sleep, that's something backpackers do in bear country, but it can also be used when car camping when traveling (not at a base camp). Pick a time to eat, and do it before you make it to your parking spot for the night. Doing that will cut down on food odor where you're sleeping. When base camping - or if you decide to eat where you park, try to position your camp kitchen & eating area downwind of your campsite, and 100' or so from it.

Either way, keep food put up as much as possible when you're eating, as well as trash. If a campsite has a bear box, use it. Dump your trash as soon as you can. Don't leave coolers out - some bears know they have food in them on site. That's more of an issue in campgrounds in places like Yellowstone, but it pays to keep coolers put up.
 

shade

Well-known member
Shade. Your entire post #16, was pot stirring. Don't bother responding again.
No, it was an attempt to defuse what you're clearly intent on stirring back up.

I've read enough from @gatorgrizz27, @mep1811, and @Alloy that I think they're reasonable people that got off on the wrong foot, and I respect them enough that I'd rather not see that misunderstanding turn into something it needn't do.
 

fitt

Member
We took Rem 870 and 2 of the biggest cans of bear spray i could get when we went to Alaska. Print out the firearm declaration form from the Canadian website , was no problems at all just asked if it was stored cased and locked while traveling then told have a nice day after paying the $25 license fee. We crossed into Canada by Glacier Nat. Park
 

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AbleGuy

TeamSuicideChipmunks
This site explaining gun import rules may be of assistance:

I’d also suggest that you study and learn the specific target anatomy of the predators you’re concerned about encountering....i.e., where to aim on an animal for the best chance of immediate stoppage.

Thirdly, since a defense of family encounter may likely occur at night, buying the appropriate, quality flashlight and installing it on your gun is a good idea.
 
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This site explaining gun import rules may be of assistance:

I’d also suggest that you study and learn the specific target anatomy of the predators you’re concerned about encountering....i.e., where to aim on an animal for the best chance of immediate stoppage.

Thirdly, since a defense of family encounter may likely occur at night, buying the appropriate, quality flashlight and installing it on your gun is a good idea.
Thank you.
 

Alloy

Well-known member
Folks, request that we keep this thread focused on making firearm recommendations for us? I have decided to get one and now need to focus on picking out one. Prefer if we don't start going on tangents regarding guns vs. no guns.

I also appreciate the advice on the bear bangers, bear horn, bear spray, camp cleanliness, food safety, etc, so please keep those coming.

Thanks.
There's allot of info online about camping in bear country. Main thing is keeping food and anything use for cooking away from the sleeping area.

There are bear spray test cans that can be used for practicing. Everyone that can should carry bear spray in a holster.

When buying bear spray make sure the can says BEAR SPRAY. Mace is illegal in Canada.

Ideally you carry both a rifle and a shotgun. Shotgun can be used on a stalking/charging bear but it is of little use if a bear is attacking someone.
 

ssc45

Observer
On the gun issue regarding bears, I carry/recommend two long guns. The first is the marlin guide gun in 45-70. They are light, fast handling and relatively inexpensive. Use a modern load with a heavy bullet for penetration. The second is a 12g shotgun in a profile that suites you. I have different ones, Semi auto, pump, side by side etc. If forced to give a newbe a recommendation it would be either a remington 870 with an 18 inch barrel. I prefer the older ones, but that is another story. The other is a mossberg in the 500 family. I routinely replace the safety with a metal part and change the stocks to a magpul. The magpul stock makes the gun more user friendly and can be adjusted for LOP, which may be of help to set up for your wife. Hard slugs are my choice for bear country. Brenneke slugs are what I carry.

Cheers, Steve
 

zimm

Expedition Leader
unless you feel like walking around with a 7 pound lump of metal to keep it where it needs to be at all times, get pepper spray. besides, you can arm the whole family with pepper spray. you can have a lampoons vacation pepper spray cross fire if you wish, and at least you all wont die from friendly fire.


as far having experience with charging bears, outside of a gunsite class where they put a bear on a sled and let it run at you, youre not gonna meet a whole lot of people with shooting charging bear experience. there may be logical reasons to not carry a gun, bt lack of charging bear experience isnt one of them. it aint like youre gonna go to the zoo and rent a charging bear for a day.
 

NoDak

Member


I'll gladly carry a 7 pound lump of metal around so I don't have to watch a family member be mauled by a bear.
 

Ducstrom

Active member
I am pretty sure that firearms are not permitted in our national parks, so you won't be able to bring them hiking there. I believe provincial parks are ok to pack a gun. You'll probably get some funny looks though.
 
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