Slide In Campers and Weight Ratings....

During your 180 mile test run was there any high side winds or much curvy/hilly 2 lane highways encountered? That's where a lack of "not enough truck" will rear it's ugly head. Driving a pick up truck not up to the requirements of a large hard side camper in high winds WILL get your attention as will narrow 2 lane highways that have heavy truck traffic, curves and hills, not my idea of fun. Never be so married to a truck that is not a proper choice for the job at hand to get the correct truck you truly need.

As my dad use to say "it's always better to have too much truck than not enough truck". In 1961 when I was about 5 years old he bought a slide in 8' hard side camper which in that time was a big camper not to mention a very rare thing to see. At the time he bought the camper we had a '58 Chevy half ton step side PU with a inline 6 cyl. motor. It got the job done but barely, it was underpowered and swayed with the weight of the camper which didn't have all the bells and whistles today's campers have. He upgraded to a '65 Ford 3/4 ton with a V-8 which made all the difference in hauling that camper around safely.
I did have strong side winds that turned into a head wind the whole way home. Radio was saying gusts up to 30 mph. A couple hills but nothing huge. There is one on the way to a spot we like to camp and it is steep with lots of curves. I am going to get the rear suspension improvements added and try that hill out soon as a test. I think if I have to white knuckle it up that mountain then I'll go get a bigger truck. I like that quote and probably good words to live by!
 

Seabass

Idiot
I've ran overloaded pickup trucks for years. For a few generations of trucks now- pick a brand- the differences between 3/4 and one ton trucks is generally minimal. The single biggest difference is in the springs that are used. Unless your talking a dually....then throw my statement out the window. So what's safe? You can put bigger springs on, add air bags, sway bars, pay close attention to where weight is located (high, low, front, back,etc....) I know from a lot of real world experience that you can make many substantial improvements to a truck to help it carry a very large load better. My personal test....how does it drive? Does it drift? Does it chase dips on the road? Does it pull grades well? Does it stop? Does it stop well. If you can comfortably say yes to all these then you could rationally say "this is ok" However- if you get in a wreck and hurt someone....and your overweight to what the trucks manufacture says- it's not good. And it's going to be awful to live with if you could have prevented it. It's a risk. I drive with extreme caution if I'm overweight. Generally I don't do it as much any more. Wisdom comes in many forms. I hope you can find the wisdom you need to make a reasonable decision that works for you. You're certainly in a good place to seek some good input from a great group of people. Good luck.
 
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Sedonut

Adventurer
The difference between 3/4 and 1 ton trucks is sometimes just the dual wheels. I had an F350 Powerstroke, a 1 Ton, with single rear wheels.

IF you get into an accident, and IF you get a sharp lawyer on the other side, which is rare but could happen, if your truck is overweight you will be found at fault even if you are not. It's a risk that could change your life, forever. I have lots of lawyers in my family. Personally, I don't think it is worth the risk. Think about it, you are doing this for fun and family adventure, not to play Russian Roulette.
 

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
I've heard that BS for years, and its just that. BS
Even if brought to court by some money hungry lawyer, it wouldn't/shouldn't stand up.
Id love for you to prove me wrong.... as most people should pay more attention to the GVWR,
but the liability for running over GVWR for the average Joe just doesn't exist.

GVWR in a non-commercial vehicle is nothing more than a MFG recommended limit.
It is anything but a legal limit. And to add to it, RV's are exempt from many legal restrictions.
Just look at all the blind old farts pulling SS, driving huge diesel pushers all over the US.... with a standard passenger car license!

So any supposed liability is a moot point.

As I said already for this particular case...

If you are happy with the way it handles, and are able to keep within the confines of the tire load ratings, run it.
The truck itself and its components are rated for MUCH more than the MFG GVWR.
 

Seabass

Idiot
I've heard that BS for years, and its just that. BS
Even if brought to court by some money hungry lawyer, it wouldn't/shouldn't stand up.
Id love for you to prove me wrong.... as most people should pay more attention to the GVWR,
but the liability for running over GVWR for the average Joe just doesn't exist.

GVWR in a non-commercial vehicle is nothing more than a MFG recommended limit.
It is anything but a legal limit. And to add to it, RV's are exempt from many legal restrictions.
Just look at all the blind old farts pulling SS, driving huge diesel pushers all over the US.... with a standard passenger car license!

So any supposed liability is a moot point.

As I said already for this particular case...

If you are happy with the way it handles, and are able to keep within the confines of the tire load ratings, run it.
The truck itself and its components are rated for MUCH more than the MFG GVWR.
I can honestly say that I've never heard of anybody in a pickup truck getting in trouble for being overweight when an accident occurred. But- it still makes good sense to say. You are correct idaSHO- it's crazy what you can get away with in a recreational vehicle. I had a dually pickup with a Diesel engine. It was a 1 ton dually. I regularly pulled 20-30k with it. I addd air bags, upgraded the springs, maintained great trailer brakes, and upgraded the brakes on the truck. Never once did I have a problem. Truck held up plenty good considering. I put 200,000 on that truck like that. As far as I know the guy that bought it uses it like that. Even now my OBS F-350 work truck weighs in at 9,000 lbs with nothing on the bed or hooked to it. It isn't even a dually. I have many times put 20,000 pounds on the gooseneck ball and took off. It does fine. But- it too sports upgraded brakes and suspension. Thank you for your post calling BS on the lawsuits. Again...I've honestly NEVER heard of it happening. But dang- I don't want to encourage some guy I have never met to over load his truck and get hurt. As a side note.....I did have a buddy rear-ended a guy. My buddy had a Ranch-hand front end replacement bumper on his Dodge......it DESTROYED the car he hit. Didn't hurt the Dodge though. Anyway, he like to got in a bind because it was stated that the damage to the car he hit wouldn't have been nearly as severe had it not been for that big hunk of bumper ripping through it. It all worked out... but it didn't look like it would for a while. Not the same as the thread discussion.....but along the same vein in terms of modification and liability
 
I had a 2005 Chevy 2500HD CC SB with a Bigfoot 9.4 flat towing a Jeep Wrangler for 13 years. I'm guessing your truck is a bit heavier being a LB. For upgrades I installed Firestone Airbags, an additional rear leaf spring, Rancho 9000 shocks and 19.5" Rickson wheels and 14 ply tires. I put 240,000 miles on it and the ONLY issue I had was the brakes overheating once on a steep mountain descent.

I was in one accident when a guy broadsided me in a Walmart parking lot while I was parked. The camper weight was not an issue and the other driver's insurance paid in full plus $1,600 for my pain & suffering.

I would still have that rig if the fridge hadn't malfunctioned this past summer and burned up the entire camper.

I'm now full timing in a 2018 Ford F350 Super Duty CC LB with 20" wheels / tires with a Northern Lite 10.2 and still towing the Jeep Wrangler. Personally, I preferred the Chevy 2500HD with the upgrades.

Looking at the sag on your rig, I don't think it looks bad. Maybe you're just not accustomed to seeing that so it bothers you ? I've seen way worse in my travels.

I'd start with airbags.

I'm with IdaSHO.....
 

STREGA

Explorer
I did have strong side winds that turned into a head wind the whole way home. Radio was saying gusts up to 30 mph. A couple hills but nothing huge. There is one on the way to a spot we like to camp and it is steep with lots of curves. I am going to get the rear suspension improvements added and try that hill out soon as a test. I think if I have to white knuckle it up that mountain then I'll go get a bigger truck. I like that quote and probably good words to live by!
The old man was a very smart and wise person, played around with rockets in the 50's/60's at Cape Canaveral, he had what we call today street cred.

Not saying you need to change trucks. After doing some rear suspension mods/sway control etc. you might be just fine and I would do that first before changing out to a different truck. Really the next step up would be a 3500 dually and do you really want to go there, duals have their own issues. Your camper does have a bit of overhang going on and the more weight behind the axle always affects the overall handling of your truck. Man some of these campers are getting huge, seen some that dwarf the crew cab dually they were sitting on.
 

CrazyDrei

Space Monkey
I've heard that BS for years, and its just that. BS
Even if brought to court by some money hungry lawyer, it wouldn't/shouldn't stand up.
Id love for you to prove me wrong.... as most people should pay more attention to the GVWR,
but the liability for running over GVWR for the average Joe just doesn't exist.

GVWR in a non-commercial vehicle is nothing more than a MFG recommended limit.
It is anything but a legal limit. And to add to it, RV's are exempt from many legal restrictions.
Just look at all the blind old farts pulling SS, driving huge diesel pushers all over the US.... with a standard passenger car license!

So any supposed liability is a moot point.

As I said already for this particular case...

If you are happy with the way it handles, and are able to keep within the confines of the tire load ratings, run it.
The truck itself and its components are rated for MUCH more than the MFG GVWR.

IdaSHO,

You are absolutely correct about the BS, most people are so brainwashed by what they want to believe that they don't even care what the laws actually say. MFG GVWR is just like the MFG towing rating, only a recommendation and nothing else. My Class C license allows me to legally drive 26,000lbs on a public road. The same law also sates that I must have a 1,000ft braking distance from travel speed to a complete stop and it is my responsibility to maitan that distance while driving, same law also states that is another vehicle pulls out in front of me and causes an accident by depriving me of the 1,000 stoping distance is at fault. Last time I mentioned that sparked a lot of hate.

I'm with you, be the judge of your own skills and equipment, of you are comfortable with it drive it safely, if not, downsize the accessories and upsize the vehicle.
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
I've heard that BS for years, and its just that. BS
Even if brought to court by some money hungry lawyer, it wouldn't/shouldn't stand up.
Id love for you to prove me wrong.... as most people should pay more attention to the GVWR,
but the liability for running over GVWR for the average Joe just doesn't exist.

GVWR in a non-commercial vehicle is nothing more than a MFG recommended limit.
It is anything but a legal limit. And to add to it, RV's are exempt from many legal restrictions.
Just look at all the blind old farts pulling SS, driving huge diesel pushers all over the US.... with a standard passenger car license!

So any supposed liability is a moot point.

As I said already for this particular case...

If you are happy with the way it handles, and are able to keep within the confines of the tire load ratings, run it.
The truck itself and its components are rated for MUCH more than the MFG GVWR.

It's up to you if you want to risk being caught over GVWR. I know someone who just lost his savings, his truck, and had to sell his boat and all his toys to cover the legal fees of this. Check with your insurance company to see if your insured for "space shuttle".

In his case, it's worth noting that the used service body trucks, that are so nice to pick up for this kind of stuff, are only rated for 2100# cargo capacity. (F350 gas) And obviously, it's very easy to exceed that.

Brake checking loaded pickups is a career choice now.
 

plainjaneFJC

Goofball
It's up to you if you want to risk being caught over GVWR. I know someone who just lost his savings, his truck, and had to sell his boat and all his toys to cover the legal fees of this. Check with your insurance company to see if your insured for "space shuttle".

Brake checking loaded pickups is a career choice now.
I agree. Insurance will cover negligence, but overloading a truck and knowing it is gross negligence, big difference.
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
Looking at that pic, you need to fix that squat for sure.

You'll have no front brakes at all in slick conditions. My work truck had the same issue for a long time. I try to keep my tail far above level now. At least an inch.
 

PJorgen

Observer
I've heard that BS for years, and its just that. BS
Even if brought to court by some money hungry lawyer, it wouldn't/shouldn't stand up.
Id love for you to prove me wrong.... as most people should pay more attention to the GVWR,
but the liability for running over GVWR for the average Joe just doesn't exist.

GVWR in a non-commercial vehicle is nothing more than a MFG recommended limit.
It is anything but a legal limit. And to add to it, RV's are exempt from many legal restrictions.
Just look at all the blind old farts pulling SS, driving huge diesel pushers all over the US.... with a standard passenger car license!

So any supposed liability is a moot point.

As I said already for this particular case...

If you are happy with the way it handles, and are able to keep within the confines of the tire load ratings, run it.
The truck itself and its components are rated for MUCH more than the MFG GVWR.
Much as I discourage people from driving overweight rigs, IdaSHO has it right regarding all the liability talk being BS.

First - your insurance policy provides liability coverage. They will cover you if you're overweight. Some claim that your insurance will not cover you if you're overweight - BS. If you run a stop sign and cause an accident - you're covered. If you speed and cause an accident - you're covered. Worst case, if you're DUI and cause an accident - you're covered. The idea that your insurance company will not cover you in these cases is absolutely false. What would be the point of insurance if they could refuse to cover you if you do something wrong? They may drop you afterwards but that's a different issue.

Second - If the only thing you did wrong was to run your rig overweight, there is no way anyone would get a large judgement against you. The plaintiff would have to prove that the primary proximate cause of the accident was that your rig was overweight. The plaintiff would probably also name Chevy/Ford/Ram as one of the defendants and they have the deep pockets. If Buliwyf's friend had to sell all his toys to cover legal expenses then he didn't have insurance. Part of what your liability coverage pays for is legal fees to defend you in court.

There are a lot of good reasons not to run your rig overweight, but liability is NOT one of them.
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
Until you run out of liability insurance and get sued.
https://www.allstate.com/tr/car-insurance/liability-car-insurance-cover.aspx?CMP=KNC-GG-AU-LI-181019:liability+insurance&affcode=p37858772455&ds_rl=1268052&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIoLz-0oiF3wIV1gOGCh2BoAy5EAAYAiAAEgKsfvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

I think my companies insurance is only $1 million, pretty sure my personal is way less, maybe $250 000. Nobody is going to feel sorry for you, so be careful. It costs $25 000 every time you flush a toilet in a hospital.

The nat average is $22 000, but those are just fender benders and scraped knees.
 
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