Ski Bum Truck V2.0, F450 Rough Road RV

HowardH

Adventurer
I think the Dana/Spicer is what is used on the military trucks. If my info is accurate it's an OEM system and designed into the vehicle including specific wheels and perhaps axles and hubs too. Not as a retro fit system.

There is a Canadian system called Tire Boss that is a competitor to AIR CTI. A lot of local farmers use one of these systems on their semi's. During potato harvest it is the diff between the semi's driving the fields under their own power or needing a tractor to tow them.
 

java

Expedition Leader
One other thought, using a different bag, the Firestone specs on this one say it's a little under sized. It's what kelderman has always used, on the earth roamers and what not as well, but I'm thinking maybe a larger higher-capacity bag would take less air pressure to hold the load. But in the end, is it still the same spring rate?

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java

Expedition Leader
Hmmm ping tanks may be the answer! The idea is to increase the volume, run a large airline between the bag and tank, and it allows the pressure to change more gradually as the bag gets compressed. Supposedly keeps the spring rate more constant.

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patoz

Expedition Leader
Gabe,

CO2 expands 450:1, so get you one or two of those CO2 cylinders like the ones they use to pressurize drink dispensers in bars and restaurants, stick a regulator on it along with a hose and tire chuck, and you're in business. As long as you keep the bottle upright, you will only get the gas and no liquid. If you lay if over, liquid will cause the regulator to freeze up in a matter of seconds.

new-co2-15.jpg

Back in the 70's and 80's, I was in a local 4WD Club and most of us were running 38 x 15 mud tires on our trucks, which we would air down to about 10 psi to run on the beach in Pensacola's very fine white sand. I was using a cylinder about half the size of the one in the picture, and I could air all four of my tires back up in about 8 minutes, and then do 5 or 6 more trucks also.

Granted, it's not a resource that can be renewed in the field, and is not a replacement for a compressor by any means, but when you're in a hurry or as a backup to the compressor, it works great.
 

b dkw1

Observer
But in the end, is it still the same spring rate?
Correct, at ride hieght your spring rate will still be the same regarless of bag size or ping tank size. The tanks will do nothing for your fire road ride, that is all in the shocks.
 

java

Expedition Leader
@patoz I ran a co2 tank for years in my old Toyota. They work, but sucks when they run out lol. And cold weather.

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Petrolburner

Explorer
I think the only way you're going to get a significantly smoother ride, as in worth spending the money on, is to either drastically increase travel or make it easier to air up and down. With a couple more inches of suspension travel you could have a more progressive spring rate. I think realistically your best bet is to make airing up and down easier. Ever heard of an octopus? Basically a hose network that allows you to connect all the tires at once and just let the compressor run. You could even do a hard line from the compressor to each corner or just the front and that back. Use your quick connects and coiled hoses to connect each valve stem. Then relax while your giant compressor does its job. I don't think a bigger tank will make any positive difference when you're talking highway pressure. You could do the math to figure it out I'm sure. I know that it doesn't take long for my 26 gallon compressor to kick on after airing up a few tires at my garage, and there's no way you're going to eat up the space and weight for a tank that big. The only impact going from a 2 gallon to a 5 gallon tank is going to be on your wallet. Oh, and you've only got 4 tires to air up and down now, think of the time savings!
 

java

Expedition Leader
I think the only way you're going to get a significantly smoother ride, as in worth spending the money on, is to either drastically increase travel or make it easier to air up and down. With a couple more inches of suspension travel you could have a more progressive spring rate. I think realistically your best bet is to make airing up and down easier. Ever heard of an octopus? Basically a hose network that allows you to connect all the tires at once and just let the compressor run. You could even do a hard line from the compressor to each corner or just the front and that back. Use your quick connects and coiled hoses to connect each valve stem. Then relax while your giant compressor does its job. I don't think a bigger tank will make any positive difference when you're talking highway pressure. You could do the math to figure it out I'm sure. I know that it doesn't take long for my 26 gallon compressor to kick on after airing up a few tires at my garage, and there's no way you're going to eat up the space and weight for a tank that big. The only impact going from a 2 gallon to a 5 gallon tank is going to be on your wallet. Oh, and you've only got 4 tires to air up and down now, think of the time savings!
You may be right. I should have about 5" up travel now. But it takes a lot of air pressure to stay there. Shocks are on order..... Hope they work!

And yes octo is an option, but airing up and down just kills time. I'd want ctis if I'm doing it!

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pappawheely

Autonomous4X4
We are selling everything from the shop and there is a PSIclops set in the case. It's used to set two tires to the same PSI. They don't make them anymore. Let me know if you are interested.

IMG_20190901_124653134.jpg
 

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