Rotopax - Is there something better I should be using?

Westy

Adventurer
I would look at a long range tank. It can save money over the long run avoiding expensive fuel stations plus it keeps the weight down low and allows much further range. One of the better additions to a travel vehicle in my opinion.
 

mep1811

Gentleman Adventurer
I have found that 5 gallon Jerry cans are more practical than rotopax . There are always people selling Scpeter MFCs or get the NATO style can.
 
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SmoothLC

Explorer
Bought the mounting plate and attached it to the Front Runner rack a few years ago.

Add a couple extensions and it holds 8 gallons.

I've never had a problem with the locks but usually don't leave them up there unless it's a long trip.

But maybe that's because we live in a desert. Anyway, here's how I arranged things a while back.

 

lchavez

Observer
I tried them on my roof rack a few years back. It was a warm day, around 80 degrees and they swelled up horribly. So much so that I had a heck of a time even getting them off to vent them.

Never carried them again.

I do however use the water version all the time.

for fuel I just use surecans now, but that’s in the back of my truck.
 

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DiscoDavis

Explorer
the civvy scepters don't have good storage characteristics and the spouts are poor.

Either buy the mil scepters or buy the mil wavian jerry cans. Buy once cry once, especially relevant since it is fuel related. Cheap out on other stuff.
 

rayra

Expedition Leader
the civvy scepters don't have good storage characteristics and the spouts are poor.

Either buy the mil scepters or buy the mil wavian jerry cans. Buy once cry once, especially relevant since it is fuel related. Cheap out on other stuff.
sorry, 'buy once, cry once' re fuel containers is retarded. There's decades of use of plastic jugs far thinner than the newish 'civ' Scepter. There's no 'hi-tech' benefit in paying double or quintuple to carry additional fuel.
As for 'muh spouts' since the garbage edicts of CARB were adopted nationally, who the hell wants to stand there holding 40#+ in the air with a screwy sprinloaded spout when a SuperSiphon will do the job while you go do something else?
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
Mount them on your rack and use a cable to lock them... easy solution.
 

DiscoDavis

Explorer
sorry, 'buy once, cry once' re fuel containers is retarded. There's decades of use of plastic jugs far thinner than the newish 'civ' Scepter. There's no 'hi-tech' benefit in paying double or quintuple to carry additional fuel.
As for 'muh spouts' since the garbage edicts of CARB were adopted nationally, who the hell wants to stand there holding 40#+ in the air with a screwy sprinloaded spout when a SuperSiphon will do the job while you go do something else?
Good for you. For everyone else.... don't cheap out. You can get used cans and put new seals on them. Buy the mil stuff either soviet style wavian or the scepter military. If someone only wants a can or two to keep a tractor or mower filled at home, then get whatever fuel container you like, but if you are going to travel with them and stick them on your car roof or bumper, might as well get the better one (not even that expensive).

Keep the 'rapey' and 'retarded' comments to yourself, overland genius, you aren't even 'sorry' either so don't bother putting that in front of your opinion.
 

rnArmy

Adventurer
I've used the Kolpin versions of these fuel cells. They are very similar to the Rotopax, but not as expensive. You can see my 4-gallon fuel container in the picture between the cooler and the trailer tub. They do swell up a little bit in the heat (just like the Rotopax). They may be a little hard to find (last one I bought was from Cabela's) as I think they're in the process of redesigning them. But they're still out there.

I've also got two of the 2.5 gallon metal jerry cans bolted to the sides of my little trailer. And a five-gallon jerry can on the back of my Jeep.
 

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