Perfect off-highway tire = LTX? What?

billiebob

Well-known member
To be fair most Truck guys who also travel those places know the risk especially pickup truck guys. Not all truck guys use their big truck on those types of dirt tracks. But they do put thousands of miles on them dragging dirt toys to those places. Which case the LTX tires are pretty much king of the hill. But yeah they get stuck on wet grass easily. The full on KO’s and similar tires are typically a solid 3-5mpg hit and kinda suck on the highway. I had them on my trucks for yrs. My last big Moab trip 12 days 2700 miles on pavement I put the BFG Advantage T/A Sports on and don’t think I’ll ever go back to the full on KO’s or alternatives unless I move somewhere where trail fun is nearly a daily thing.
For mpg, this was a shock to me.
33x10.50s, I was lucky to get 17mpg. I changed to 7.50R16s.... 22mpg.
A change of tires added 95 miles to my range between gas stations. I'll never got back.
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pskhaat

2005 Expedition Trophy Champion
My hopes are that you're not caught ass deep in gumbo, with a storm coming in sporting the mildest tires you think you can get away with, for the sake of a quiet ride and most mpg while on paved roads.
Funny. I'm always finding myself in precarious stuck situations. That exact scenario is quite real as I've been stranded in Tuweep as the roads became impassable washes from said summer monsoon storm.

I quite obviously have run and presently own "true" MTs, for my travels they don't have some magical walk-on-mud capabilities. I've been as stuck in that gumbo with as I have without them.
 

80t0ylc

Hill & Gully Rider
..........................I quite obviously have run and presently own "true" MTs, for my travels they don't have some magical walk-on-mud capabilities. I've been as stuck in that gumbo with as I have without them.
Common sense was my point. Of course they're not "magical". M/T tires serve more of a purpose than just mud performance, contrary to their name, and obviously they have their limitations. Here's an example: Conditions were wet but not extremely so. Temps were right around freezing, so surface was slick, but not sloppy - the frost line just under the surface. A fairly steep hill in an area that I frequent, I can walk right up with M/T's. This same hill is next to impossible with A/T's or snow treads with out a run at it. Why? Because the aggressive big lugged tread of the M/T bites into the surface, giving traction and doesn't rely on momentum. It's not flinging mud to clear out the tread, like it needs to in serious mud conditions. The milder treads just can't get the bite and spin uselessly, with out extra momentum. We've all been there - "I can continue forward, but if I stop, I'm stuck" - relying on momentum. Another example: Conditions are a steep, rough, rocky, slope - not slickrock. Tires are aired down for additional traction. Again, a situation where traction, not momentum, will keep you going. This time the biting action of the M/T will claw down to get traction on the firmer rock or soil underneath to pull you up the slope. Where the milder treads will spin excessively on the smaller surface rocks and soil using more thottle and losing rubber to climb the same slope, maybe not even able to reach the top. Sometimes the big lugs will grab an edge that the others won't or can't.

Sure, M/T's have their disadvantages and limitations. They definitely have a narrower useful range than other types. They're not an all purpose tire, that's why mine are not on my rig unless I've got something planned with them in mind. IMHO, they're a blessing to have available, but a poor choice for an all season tire, especially in the winter, at least around here. I've been on overland trips that I was glad to not have the M/T's mounted. The trick is to have them when you need them and leave 'em home when you don't so they last longer. I haven't mastered that one yet.:rolleyes:
 
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gwittman

Adventurer
I agree with Tom 100%. The drawback is needing a space to store the extra set of wheels/tires when they are not being used and the time and effort it takes to change them. It works for me for now but I think when my LTXs wear out this time I may be looking for some AT tires again even if it is a compromise. I don't mind changing the wheels/tires so much, but having two sets of tires result in them getting pretty old before they wear out. It kind of concerns me to be off-road with old tires even if they have good tread.
 

Regcabguy

Expedition Leader
A friend went from AT's to Nitto Dura Grapplers and picked up 2.5 mpg and more stable tracking. He tows heavy to the desert and loves them.
 

80t0ylc

Hill & Gully Rider
.............. I don't mind changing the wheels/tires so much, but having two sets of tires result in them getting pretty old before they wear out. It kind of concerns me to be off-road with old tires even if they have good tread.
Gary, that is a good point and ammunition for buying M/T's that wear fast. :LOL: Seriously, though, I think the original issue was running at highway speeds in hot weather with old tires that raised the date code concerns. But, in reality, you have a valid point for off road travel, also.
 

Grassland

Well-known member
Finally, the new BC signs.

View attachment 555929
a tire with the M+S and a tire with the 3PMS marking are not the same. Interesting they suggest they are. I mean, obviously an actual summer only tire won't have the M+S marking, but there are a lot of all seasons with M+S I wouldn't want to drive on in the winter.
Frankly, my Ko2 with 3PMS aren't that good on hard pack snow or ice, and on the second winter half worn, my Toyo H09 all weathers that also have the 3PMS rating aren't tons better.
 

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pskhaat

2005 Expedition Trophy Champion
and on the second winter half worn, my Toyo H09 all weathers that also have the 3PMS rating aren't tons better.
Stupid anecdote but this made me remember something: I had this neighbor years ago who would buy the cheapest new winter tires (always studded) he could find every October, then sell them in the classifieds every May as "just one season" used. I used to think he was crazy for spending all that $, but I have no idea what is actual ROI was...
 

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
Gary, that is a good point and ammunition for buying M/T's that wear fast. :LOL: Seriously, though, I think the original issue was running at highway speeds in hot weather with old tires that raised the date code concerns. But, in reality, you have a valid point for off road travel, also.
Tires last a long time at slow speeds.
 

Arctic Taco

Adventurer
I ran a set of LTXs on my 01 Ram 2500 CTD, they did surprising well on many different surfaces. My commute was about 85 miles of gravel road which did shorten their life somewhat. So I thought I would try some Toyo AT II s they seem to do well on the Tacoma, a bit of excessive wear till I got the pressures right (I think). Might try geolanders if I can get them in a235/85 16, with the commute I really do need a Load range E tire, that road just eats tires, so far with E s, I get fewer flats.
The photo is of my Tacoma a few years ago going out to work on the first da6 with 2 flats on load range Cs, shortly before I upsized to the Toyo AT II.
2E50236A-1E71-4F48-94AE-D863DB21EED0.jpeg
Current look with the stock rims and a 235/85 R16 Toyos. I like pizza cutters.C2D1A577-ED22-46A3-AFF5-49A5A3C97064.jpeg
 

BigSwede

The Credible Hulk
MT tires are not "dedicated mud tires", they are a compromise between all-terrain and actual dedicated mud tires (like Super Swampers), which is why they still struggle in serious mud.
 

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
Different soils interact with different tread patterns differently too.

I have MT's on mine and have yet to find them particularly impressive for anything other than longevity. Mine (Firestone Destination MT's) seem to cake up about the same as any other pickup tire.

I am going with an aggressive AT for the next go around. Better in snow, better on the highway, won't fling friggin' boulders... might help mpg a tad too?
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
I prefer slightly compromised mud tires. For example would rather have Cooper stt's rather than Pitbull Rockers.

For the real sticky stuff, claws or chains are required,
 
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