Peg Hammer Options?

herm

Adventurer
the back of a fiskars hatchet works great for me, plus it is a wonderful tool for doing many other tasks. When backpacking in the summer, I just find a rock.
 

endo

PRIMITIVEROAD
The copper head would IMO eventually mushroom out and is pretty pricey
That is the point of the brass head. It meant to mushroom and out on impact with a object harder than itself. This makes sense on hard steel tent stakes as it saves the end of the stake from becoming mis-shaped and sharp with repeated hammering. Making for a safer stake around the camp site. The brass is sacrificial and should be considered a consumable item.
 

MarcFJ60

Adventurer
I have the Coleman version of the Coghlan's hammer. There just isn't enough weight to it to drive stakes through rough ground or rooted earth. After my last camping trip struggling with that hammer, I was planning on picking up a cheap hammer at HF, HD, or Lowes. That being said, I don't have a hatchet in my camping equipment, so I'm liking that idea. I don't think I want to go cheap on the hatchet, however.

That Snowpeak hammer looks great, but that's more money than I'm willing to spend on such a specific use item that will see infrequent use.
 

mogwildRW1

Adventurer
Have you looked at twist in pegs? They are cheap, you can screw them back out and re-use them, no hammer needed ;)
 

STREGA

Explorer
That is the point of the brass head. It meant to mushroom and out on impact with a object harder than itself. This makes sense on hard steel tent stakes as it saves the end of the stake from becoming mis-shaped and sharp with repeated hammering. Making for a safer stake around the camp site. The brass is sacrificial and should be considered a consumable item.

I'am well aware of the purpose of a soft material on a hammer head. I went back and looked at the SP site and they do have replacement copper heads although there was no price or part# listed, I'am sure it's pricey. I had to laugh at the picture of the mushroomed head they were replacing, it was way past the time it should have been replaced (maybe they were wanting a extreme case to make it easy to see) and very unsafe to use. Anyway at $60 it is a pricey hammer at best. They also don't mention protecting the stake as a reason for the copper head but to reduce the shock on your hand/wrist. As far as stakes go they are usually cheap and easily found everywhere unlike a replacement copper head, for me they are the expendable item. I'am also using the medium size SP pegs, which were $4.50 each, which is the most I have ever paid for a peg but are very stout and are easy to drive into hard/rocky terrain that we tend to have here in the southwest. When they start to mushroom out I will take them to the bench grinder and dress them up much like I do a chiesel or punch.

Before I bought the SP steel hammer I was using a Estwing rockhammer like Mc Taco (I'am a 3rd generation rock hound). The pointy end does work very well to remove stakes but you have to pay attention not to impale yourself with it as well. The other small draw back to it is the head is small and its easy to miss the stake, the SP has a good size head and it's hard to miss the stake. It is a good multi use tool though and will always carry one with me. I also carry a Estwing hand axe and never use it anymore since going to a propane campfire so I will be removing it from the Kit.
 

Tom and Elaine

Observer
Estwing rock hammer has been in our "tool" box for years, has a lot of uses along with stake driving and pulling. I like to get as many uses out of every piece equipment that I carry. Still have my Estwing axe in the box on the front of the Tentrax. Seems to get used every trip for one thing or another. T&E
 
I used to use the back of my hatchet, but a few years ago I found a rubber mallet in my stocking. My wife is very thoughtful, it is one of the white rubber ones. Very effective and gentle on tent stakes. Had a few of those in my stocking too! Only problem is that when it rubs against stuff it leaves white marks. Not really a big deal, I don't really need it, but a happy marriage is mostly about compromise.
 

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rb70383

Observer
Just getting into camping and while looking for gear, the wife found a rubber head mallet for 1.99. Looks just like coleman one however it doesnt have the eyelet in the handle. I think I should be able to install an eyelet if needed. Like said just getting into camping, we are using the cheap stakes. they also look like the coleman ones. Weight isnt a concern yet, being we are car camping for now.
 

lupinsea

Observer
I usually pack an Estwing ~3 lb. mini-sledge in my tool back when heading into the back country / camping. It's my "BFH" for, well, anything I need it for. While it's main purpose is as a whacking implement for vehicle repairs I'll often use it to drive in tent stakes . . . when I use tent stakes which is almost never.

Estwing Crack Hammer

The above hammer is really good and compact for getting in tight spots (thinking of work on the rig) but it's heavy enough to be useful.

I don't see the point of a dedicated tent stake hammer and if not for this then maybe the Estwing hatchet / hammer combo thingy.
 

jerdog53

Explorer
I'm interested in getting a dedicated peg hammer; too many improvised bashing items have been marred or destroyed... I am hoping people could share their experiences.

At the top of the watch list is the Snow Peak copper-head hammer, though I'm not yet ready to justify the cost. It also appears that SP recently released a steel-head version.

Has anyone had any experience with either version, that they could share?
I have the Snow Peak for about two years now, I like it and it works great but I don't backpack with it. I would probably just use my Wetterlings small forest ax to drive stakes when backpacking.
 
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