(partially) new Tundra coming?

toylandcruiser

Expedition Leader
hm… isn’t open differential, that can be mechanically Locked 100%, better than complicated central slip diff where you can’t even put it in low gear without locking it electrically? Also size wise that transfer case is smaller than the Toyota’s. This is not to say Toyota’s T case was bad.
The lt230 is 100% open. Ashcroft makes a limited slip for it.
The Toyota awd can be put into low range without locking it. I do it all the time in my gx.
 

phsycle

Adventurer
Yep

If I build an identical 2021 F150 to how my 2015 is equipped there is quite a difference in price. There is also 6 years of price adjustments so that can make a difference...

My 2015:

View attachment 686139

Similar 2021:
View attachment 686140
View attachment 686141

I'm guessing it would be a similar story between a 2016 and 2022 Tundra.
Yes. I priced out Tundra SR5’s at around $38k in 2018. Nothing even close to that right now. Same with F150’s, Silverado’s and Rams.

I even priced out Powerwagons in the mid $40k’s then as well. Not going to happen now.
 

Todd n Natalie

OverCamper
Yes. I priced out Tundra SR5’s at around $38k in 2018. Nothing even close to that right now. Same with F150’s, Silverado’s and Rams.

I even priced out Powerwagons in the mid $40k’s then as well. Not going to happen now.
I just built a very lightly optioned Power Wagon.. I added Level 1, tow tech package, LED bed lights and shift on the fly transfer case. That was it and it was 74K....:(

oddly enough, when I build a similar spec Rebel, it comes out about the same? 🤷‍♂️
Screenshot 2021-10-07 142704.png
Screenshot 2021-10-07 142630.png
 

skrypj

Well-known member
When I bought my old F150 XLT back in 2015, it stickered at $48k. But with incentives, it came down to $37k. Looking at a similarly optioned Tundra (SR5), it was about the same at $38k, which was I think $1,500 off MSRP.

So there is definitely more “incentives” with Ford. Now, that is all gone.

HOWEVER, all the incentives, cash back, etc is a red herring. Price is the price. They can set the MSRP to $1M and give you a 95% discount to make most people feel better. I couldn’t care less, personally.

I look now, and yup, pricing for an XLT and SR5 is still about the same.
I don’t think that’ll change.
I do agree with this. Tundra’s are just cheaper from the get go(or at least the were). A fully loaded tundra is under $60k msrp im pretty sure but thats a well equipped XLT f150. The F150 just gets 20%+ in discounts if you try.

My lariat was $56k sticker i think and i got it for around 42k.
 
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Todd n Natalie

OverCamper
I do agree with this. Tundra’s are just cheaper from the get go(or at least the were). A fully loaded tundra is under $60k msrp im pretty sure but thats a well equipped XLT f150. The F150 just gets 20%+ in discounts if you try.
Once upon a time anyway....

Maybe when the lots are flooded with all the 2021's that have been waiting for chips and the 2022's are hitting the lots at the same time we'll see some discounts again. Who knows?
 

phsycle

Adventurer
Once upon a time anyway....

Maybe when the lots are flooded with all the 2021's that have been waiting for chips and the 2022's are hitting the lots at the same time we'll see some discounts again. Who knows?
I really doubt the comparative pricing (actual selling price) among the 1/2 ton trucks will differ by any significant amount. If the Tundra does indeed end up costing thousands less, it’s a no-brainer.
 

Todd n Natalie

OverCamper
I really doubt the comparative pricing (actual selling price) among the 1/2 ton trucks will differ by any significant amount. If the Tundra does indeed end up costing thousands less, it’s a no-brainer.
Yeah, I think all things considered Ram, GM, Ford and Toyota will be pretty close.
 

skrypj

Well-known member
What astounds me with the payload on the Tundra is that they do not have an HD truck that they might overlap with if they get to aggressive on the Tundra. With Ford, they could just run 7700 lbs GVWR like they used back in the 11-14 trucks, and crew cab Lariat's F150's would have 2200+ lbs of payload. But then they are running the same or more payload than many F250 diesels.

Toyota has nothing. They could set the GVWR to whatever they want within reason and they are not encroaching on any other vehicle in their line up. You listen to the interviews with Mike Sweers about not wanting to "play that game" but they are not even in the game. If you can't get a truck with >1500 lbs payload, then forget taking a family of 4 on a camping trip with even a modestly sized travel trailer. My travel trailer is 5500 lbs GVWR and I bet when I am loaded up for a trip, my truck is right at GVWR with 1560 lbs of payload.

I am not saying I need 3000 lbs of payload in a Tundra, but give me 1900 lbs in an SR5 crew cab. What the hell? It's not about being competitive, its about aligning the real world capability with that of the specs. You are not towing a 12000 lbs trailer with 1400 lbs of payload.

I know people make jokes about half tons been the modern minivan, but they are still quite capable when not neutered by poor specs. I tow my travel trailer and keep up with the HD diesels in whatever conditions I've faced here in Utah and the surrounding states. I can tow a 70 mph in crosswinds and up grades.
 

skrypj

Well-known member
Oh, and one other comment. The one nice thing about these tow rating wars is that they drive the manufacturers to up their payload specs. The truck has to be able to handle a 10% tongue weight and 300 lbs of passengers + the weight of the hitch. That means an F150 with a 14000 lb tow rating needs to be able to handle 1400+300+75(?) lbs of payload minimum. So right there you are pushing 1800 lbs. If ford ever wants to increase their towing, they also need to bump their payload and axle ratings to keep up.

While the maximum ratings are still unrealistic, the increased payload and axle ratings do mean that your real life capabilities are increased. Maybe your truck could only realistically handle a 6000 lbs travel trailer before, but the new one can now handle 7000 lbs and still be within ratings. Toyota completely ignored this fact. Sure it has a 12000 lb tow rating, but the payload means that the realistic towing capability is still far lower than a Ford or GM truck. Even if those Ford or GM trucks have a lower tow rating. Take the 3.0 Duramax with a 9000 lb tow rating for example, if it has 1700 lbs of payload vs a Tundra with 1400, the Duramax is still a more capable truck even if the Tundra has a higher tow rating.
 

rruff

Explorer
I am not saying I need 3000 lbs of payload in a Tundra, but give me 1900 lbs in an SR5 crew cab. What the hell?
The tires and rear suspension are designed for light loads... because 1/2 tons are commuter cars. Just beef up those parts and load it. It's neither illegal nor unsafe to do so, if you are semi intelligent about upgrades. Staying under axle ratings is probably a good idea. On my Tundra that is ~2,500 lb over curb weight, max.
 
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