Off Grid Trailers

RonC

New member
Thank for all of that info! Has anyone compared Off Grid with the Boreas XT? I’m deciding between one of those two. On another thread someone mentioned that the OGT Expo has more storage space, but storage won’t be an issue for me as I’ll be towing with a full size pickup.
There is something to say for having everything in the trailer ready to go. Little if any packing of the tow vehicle. Always packed always ready to go.

Ron
 

DRAX

Member
Thank for all of that info! Has anyone compared Off Grid with the Boreas XT? I’m deciding between one of those two. On another thread someone mentioned that the OGT Expo has more storage space, but storage won’t be an issue for me as I’ll be towing with a full size pickup.
The Boreas XT was in the running when we were trying to decide on which trailer to go with. We weren't looking at the OGT Expo, only the Pando, and while the Boreas XT has some features the Pando doesn't, the Pando had fewer compromises when it came to our wants and needs. The rear galley of the Pando seems to be easier to work with without blocking as much of the countertop with everything being a slide-out. In fact, there's no dry storage where the fridge and sink/stove slide out of the Boreas. The Pando does lose some countertop space due to the fixed sink (does have a stainless cover so you don't lose countertop space when not using the sink), but there's storage below and there's a more traditional fridge back there that doesn't need to be slid out to access it.

The other mark against the Boreas XT was, at the time, the lack of opening windows in the side doors. They used separate screen doors, so if you wanted ventilation then you had to actually have one or both doors actually open, leaving you more exposed and making it more difficult to close things up if you're in bed and a rainstorm pops up or you have a bear coming to visit. Below is what was offered when we were looking. For 2022 they've updated the doors again and have awning windows.

The OGT trailers also come with a high-capacity roof rack, a front rack where you can store firewood or whatever, and the furnace in the Pando is in the external box and doesn't take up internal storage. May also be quieter having the furnace itself not inside the cabin.

When we optioned out both the Pando and Boreas XT with the options we wanted the Pando was about $3k more but we felt it was better laid out with fewer compromises.

 

stevo_pct

Active member
Thanks @DRAX, that's good info! I agree, I didn't like the door on the 2021 model. I'm in line for a 2022 right now (have a deposit down and can get it all back except $500 if I change my mind and go with an OFG instead).

With the Pando, it looks like the fridge in the galley area is really small, which makes me think I'd opt for the additional fridge in the front box. But then I'd lose all that storage space that I could use for other camping items.

I get what you're saying about the Boreas galley area. I feel mixed about it.

There is something to say for having everything in the trailer ready to go. Little if any packing of the tow vehicle. Always packed always ready to go.
This isn't a concern for my purposes. I'm looking for something for long term (multi-month) travel, not quick weekend getaways. So I'm not concerned with how well I can keel the trailer packed up and ready to go in the garage. For the past year or so, I was thinking I would go with a slide in truck camper, but decided against that due to lack of storage and exceeding the GVWR of a full sized truck. Compared to a slide in camper, any of these trailer options have WAY more space. Not only in the trailer itself, but because it gives back my truck bed space.

I do like that the Expo has a lot more storage space than the Boreas XT because you have the entire rear area for storage, instead of a galley, but I don't like how the galley is just a slide out system on the side. If the weather is bad, you have to put up the awning to cook, whereas, with the Boreas XT or the Pando, you can good under the rear hatch/door. I also don't like that you don't have any counter space when using the side galley on the Expo - and all your food storage is around the corner at the back. But maybe that's a minor detail that I'd get used to.
 

DRAX

Member
Thanks @DRAX, that's good info! I agree, I didn't like the door on the 2021 model. I'm in line for a 2022 right now (have a deposit down and can get it all back except $500 if I change my mind and go with an OFG instead).

With the Pando, it looks like the fridge in the galley area is really small, which makes me think I'd opt for the additional fridge in the front box. But then I'd lose all that storage space that I could use for other camping items.

I get what you're saying about the Boreas galley area. I feel mixed about it.
The Pando galley fridge is spec'd as a 57L fridge/freezer combo. We did opt for the additional 55L Dometic up front as well. Sure, it does take up space that could be used for other things, but we plan to eventually do some long-term travel and having that extra fridge could mean the difference between going from a few days to 1-2 weeks between restocking. I have Decked storage and a topper for my truck and previously had an ICECO VL60D mounted to a tilt slide on top of my Decked storage. It worked OK but I'd rather have the trailer have all the equipment and have the truck free to carry other things. Don't have the trailer yet so we haven't been able to go through the exercise of packing it up yet, though.

I'm not expecting too many surprises, though. Will definitely update this thread as we figure things out.
 

4000lbsOfGoat

Well-known member
If the weather is bad, you have to put up the awning to cook, whereas, with the Boreas XT or the Pando, you can good under the rear hatch/door.
I think that you would find that the rear hatch\door only provides protection from the weather in theory. Rain never really comes straight down and is almost always accompanied by wind. It's really the wind that is going to cause trouble with cooking in either case. When cooking must be done outside it's always best to have some food on hand that doesn't need to be cooked for those bad weather days.

This isn't a concern for my purposes. I'm looking for something for long term (multi-month) travel, not quick weekend getaways. So I'm not concerned with how well I can keel the trailer packed up and ready to go in the garage. For the past year or so, I was thinking I would go with a slide in truck camper, but decided against that due to lack of storage and exceeding the GVWR of a full sized truck. Compared to a slide in camper, any of these trailer options have WAY more space. Not only in the trailer itself, but because it gives back my truck bed space.
When doing a multi-month trip it's not necessarily about "keeping packed in the garage" it's about "which things do I want inside the trailer with me at all times?" I think you'll find that ends up being a good number of things. Once you're all bundled into one of these little campers for the night, it's really not a lot of fun to have to get back out to grab something from the truck....
 

stevo_pct

Active member
When doing a multi-month trip it's not necessarily about "keeping packed in the garage" it's about "which things do I want inside the trailer with me at all times?" I think you'll find that ends up being a good number of things. Once you're all bundled into one of these little campers for the night, it's really not a lot of fun to have to get back out to grab something from the truck....
Right, but I though the internal storage (i.e. inside the sleeping cabin) is pretty similar between the Boreas and OGT (we were talking about this on another thread). The internal dimensions are almost exactly the same, so there's only so much possibility.

Sorry for all the questions. I have seen the Boreas in person but can't seem to find an OGT to see so I'm trying to figure this out some other way...

I'm in Colorado in the event there is anyone around here with an OGT that doesn't mind showing it.
 

4000lbsOfGoat

Well-known member
Right, but I though the internal storage (i.e. inside the sleeping cabin) is pretty similar between the Boreas and OGT (we were talking about this on another thread). The internal dimensions are almost exactly the same, so there's only so much possibility.

Sorry for all the questions. I have seen the Boreas in person but can't seem to find an OGT to see so I'm trying to figure this out some other way...

I'm in Colorado in the event there is anyone around here with an OGT that doesn't mind showing it.
What I was trying to get across in the other thread is that although the total internal dimensions of the Expedition and Boreas are pretty much the same, the internal storage compartments are much larger in the Expedition.

This is the Boreas interior storage area:

BoreasInterior.jpg

This is the Expedition interior storage area:

ExpeditionInterior.jpg

So if you consider that the overall interior space is about the same, you can see that the Expedition storage area is much larger. If you skip the TV (I mean really, do we need to take up that much valuable interior space with a TV???) then you get another door on the bottom right that is the same size as the one on the bottom left. Unfortunately I don't have my camper with me to give you exact dimensions, but the storage area in the Expedition is more than 2 feet deep. The storage area in the Boreas looks to be around 14-16 inches deep. The rear galley eats up the rest of the space in the Boreas. I think you would be hard-pressed to fits months worth of clothing for 2 people in the Boreas, let alone anything else.
 

DRAX

Member
I think you would be hard-pressed to fits months worth of clothing for 2 people in the Boreas, let alone anything else.
I'm not sure who would pack that much clothing. For our current 2-3 week trips we never planned on being away from civilization for more than a few days, we'd pack 7 days of clothing (really a few days worth for different weather/temp conditions) and plan on spending lunch doing laundry at a laundromat once a week or so. Could always bring stuff to do laundry while camping, but can't always count on clothes drying within a reasonable time. For our future, longer trips I expect us to do similar but probably pack as much as we can reasonably fit in case we're unable to do laundry for a while.
 
I really like the new chassis design and I believe the XT comes with the cruismaster. Plus one would not have to deal with registration issues. Maybe that is not even an issue in your State. The OTG are awesome rigs. Tough choice. Are you near Denver? If so that would put you in a buy from the factory just like OTG.
 

stevo_pct

Active member
I only pack a few days of clothing regardless of the length of the trip. When I hiked the Pacific Crest Trail back in 2004, I only had one set of clothing (that which I was wearing) with the only exception being a few extra pairs of socks and a set of long underwear I dedicated for sleeping. That was a 5 month trip.

I wouldn't have to be that extreme camping on the road with a trailer - I'd plan on doing laundry every week or two. I don't mind wearing the same clothes for a few days in a row as long as I have something clean to sleep in. And I often "do laundry" by jumping into a lake/river with my clothes on. Or just take my shirt/socks off and rinse them in a creek to get them "camping clean".

I really like the new chassis design and I believe the XT comes with the cruismaster. Plus one would not have to deal with registration issues. Maybe that is not even an issue in your State. The OTG are awesome rigs. Tough choice. Are you near Denver? If so that would put you in a buy from the factory just like OTG.
I'm just outside of Denver, less than a 30 minute drive from the Boreas shop. So that's definitely a point in favor of the Boreas. I'm probably overthinking this because it's such an expensive purchase. Either rig is probably a great option and they are probably close enough to each other in terms of build quality and features that it doesn't really matter.

I do like that the Boreas comes standard with a pull out awning with an optional tent enclosure (with bug netting). On the other side of the trailer I'd probably add a 180 degree awning with the optional walls. That gives a lot of living space protected from bugs/elements.

And yes, the Boreas comes with the cruisemaster suspension and I love the new chassis design. It is 2 feet longer than the OGT, but I like that I can put the mountain bikes in front of the front storage box rather than on top of the cabin.
 
I only pack a few days of clothing regardless of the length of the trip. When I hiked the Pacific Crest Trail back in 2004, I only had one set of clothing (that which I was wearing) with the only exception being a few extra pairs of socks and a set of long underwear I dedicated for sleeping. That was a 5 month trip.

I wouldn't have to be that extreme camping on the road with a trailer - I'd plan on doing laundry every week or two. I don't mind wearing the same clothes for a few days in a row as long as I have something clean to sleep in. And I often "do laundry" by jumping into a lake/river with my clothes on. Or just take my shirt/socks off and rinse them in a creek to get them "camping clean".



I'm just outside of Denver, less than a 30 minute drive from the Boreas shop. So that's definitely a point in favor of the Boreas. I'm probably overthinking this because it's such an expensive purchase. Either rig is probably a great option and they are probably close enough to each other in terms of build quality and features that it doesn't really matter.

I do like that the Boreas comes standard with a pull out awning with an optional tent enclosure (with bug netting). On the other side of the trailer I'd probably add a 180 degree awning with the optional walls. That gives a lot of living space protected from bugs/elements.

And yes, the Boreas comes with the cruisemaster suspension and I love the new chassis design. It is 2 feet longer than the OGT, but I like that I can put the mountain bikes in front of the front storage box rather than on top of the cabin.
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Isn't the boreas more expensive? I assume the build time is longer as well. If those two questions don't matter to you Boreas is probably the best option especially if you need repair s
 

stevo_pct

Active member
The Boreas is actually a little less expensive once you option them out. The base price for the Boreas is a little more, but there are more standard features included. I’d consider them equally priced for all intents and purposes. I’m not sure on the build times. I emailed OGT and haven’t heard back yet. I can get a Boreas in June
 

4000lbsOfGoat

Well-known member
I do like that the Boreas comes standard with a pull out awning with an optional tent enclosure (with bug netting). On the other side of the trailer I'd probably add a 180 degree awning with the optional walls. That gives a lot of living space protected from bugs/elements.
Bear in mind that lots of awnings and walls means lots of added weight. You may only set them up now and then but you will move them everywhere you go.

I'm not sure who would pack that much clothing.
Our trailer is packed for an indefinite period on the road (we do not have any other permanent "home"). Our last trip spanned AZ, CA, NV, UT, ID, MT, WY, CO and NM. We go prepared for all of those different weather conditions and only do laundry every 2-3 weeks. It adds up to a fair amount of clothing. If you're going to stay in one weather area then you might need less.
 
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