New Defender News

ChasingOurTrunks

Active member
Lift rods just keep it 2" above normal ride height all the time - will not affect EAS lift above that height and doesn't interface with the terrain response system. The only effect to driving dynamics is a higher COG in normal driving. Huge negative is when you need to get into a parking garage with less than 7 foot height...you can't.
That makes sense, thanks. I’m looking forward to the coming months when we see some at stock ride height doing its thing. I’d especially like to see one spec’d more closely to how this community would use it (slightly bigger & more aggressive tires, rear locker from factory, etc.). I’m not convinced that the lift rods will be a “necessary” mod yet (eye of the beholder, of course).

Those sheep in the background feel much better knowing the Defender can back right up to where they may die. 🤠
Critical for Land Rover to license that video so they can lock down the sheep farming market with this exact concern :D


Very impressive. The Gladiator had issues because of its wheelbase (137")...the Defender's is 119" and I'm willing to bet a little more ground clearance. The new 90 will have a 101" wheelbase and I can't wait to see it here again with the '94 90...

Same! My dream video would compare the Defender 90 and 110 with the JL - 2 door and 4 door, both spec’d for the most “off road” worthiness they can be from the factory, and no other mods. Bonus points if it’s with the same driver picking an identical line. Take an established trail rating system and run the quadruplet through all the way to the max rated trail just to see their relative performance. I would be very curious what the practical limits are for the various stock vehicles without mods (knowing full well that the Jeep will be much easier to mod in the future if need be - this provides a bit more of an apples to apples contest). If anyone wants to donate $300k PM me for my paypal!! :p

Tfl testing trucks on marbles again. Nothing wrong with it, but it's a bit of luck.

They did demonstrate the dramatic difference between good line, bad line, with the Glad.
I think you have hit on the truth of it. Most modern 4x4s (and by that I mean vehicles sold as off road rigs — like the Bison, Rubicon, Defender; I don’t just mean vehicles with a AWD/4x4 option) are good enough from the factory for 95%+ what people will see. Line selection and driver experience - and even simpler, tire tread and pressure — can make a much bigger difference than the brand of the rig off road.

TFL also tends to refer to moderate off road trails as being super tough off road conditions, even when it looks like the kind of stuff I wouldn’t hesitate to take my bone stock 1500 Silverado WT down on a typical Sunday drive — I don’t know if it’s editing/videography not properly representing how though it actually is, or if it’s perhaps the hosts have a different standard of “tough off road” than I do. But, they also tend to show the rigs in fairly typical and common conditions for the majority of adventure touring — the really extreme stuff is attempted by relatively few people as compared to the “testing on marbles” stuff they sometimes do.
 

gatorgrizz27

Active member
That makes sense, thanks. I’m looking forward to the coming months when we see some at stock ride height doing its thing. I’d especially like to see one spec’d more closely to how this community would use it (slightly bigger & more aggressive tires, rear locker from factory, etc.). I’m not convinced that the lift rods will be a “necessary” mod yet (eye of the beholder, of course).



Critical for Land Rover to license that video so they can lock down the sheep farming market with this exact concern :D





Same! My dream video would compare the Defender 90 and 110 with the JL - 2 door and 4 door, both spec’d for the most “off road” worthiness they can be from the factory, and no other mods. Bonus points if it’s with the same driver picking an identical line. Take an established trail rating system and run the quadruplet through all the way to the max rated trail just to see their relative performance. I would be very curious what the practical limits are for the various stock vehicles without mods (knowing full well that the Jeep will be much easier to mod in the future if need be - this provides a bit more of an apples to apples contest). If anyone wants to donate $300k PM me for my paypal!! :p



I think you have hit on the truth of it. Most modern 4x4s (and by that I mean vehicles sold as off road rigs — like the Bison, Rubicon, Defender; I don’t just mean vehicles with a AWD/4x4 option) are good enough from the factory for 95%+ what people will see. Line selection and driver experience - and even simpler, tire tread and pressure — can make a much bigger difference than the brand of the rig off road.

TFL also tends to refer to moderate off road trails as being super tough off road conditions, even when it looks like the kind of stuff I wouldn’t hesitate to take my bone stock 1500 Silverado WT down on a typical Sunday drive — I don’t know if it’s editing/videography not properly representing how though it actually is, or if it’s perhaps the hosts have a different standard of “tough off road” than I do. But, they also tend to show the rigs in fairly typical and common conditions for the majority of adventure touring — the really extreme stuff is attempted by relatively few people as compared to the “testing on marbles” stuff they sometimes do.
I agree with your first point, most of the mods are just cosmetic, or people will put 22” wheels with 35’s on a lifted vehicle, making it less capable than stock. The Jeep crowd around here seems mostly interested in comparing bolt on powder coated jewelry.

That’s also my beef with TFL, it’s mostly click bait. They have the opportunity to do some cool stuff but always just seem to give up right as it’s actually getting interesting. “We might get stuck, so we just turned around”, or the find something that’s basically the road to a popular hiking trailhead. Take another freaking truck and a strap, or at least a pair of Max Trax. There’s at least 3-4 “hosts” on the snow and it appears they always have at least that many vehicles sitting around.

Case in point, LR3 in the snow video, followed by someone else’s video where they actually get an LR3 stuck in the snow.


 

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TexasTJ

Climbing Nerd
That sucks for Land Rover. The 90 is so much better looking than the 110. With the 6 seater option it would be a vary cool truck.
 

shawnpalmer

New member
Lift rods just keep it 2" above normal ride height all the time - will not affect EAS lift above that height and doesn't interface with the terrain response system. The only effect to driving dynamics is a higher COG in normal driving. Huge negative is when you need to get into a parking garage with less than 7 foot height...you can't.
Sure you can, you just put the truck in access mode height and lock it there.
 

naks

Well-known member
Sure you can, you just put the truck in access mode height and lock it there.
What he means is: once you fit lift rods, the Access height is now 2" higher.

The rods fool the car into thinking that the car is lower than it actually is, so the car then increases its Baseline height.

Since all Height modes are based on that Baseline height, all heights are now 2" higher, including Access.

This is why I prefer doing lifts with my IID tool, it's software only and on the fly.

Sent from my G8441 using Tapatalk
 

A.J.M

Explorer
Land Rover have been sticking v8s in the models for decades.

the only difference is now the engines aren’t detuned to let the car cope.
And even without the detune, they were never overly fast or powerful.

Plenty of SVR models my way, despite the fuel bills. This will sell well in the gulf states etc where petrol is cheap.

My hope is now that Land Rover have Bowler, they will make some off road versions with that name and with some decent engines under the bonnet.
 

mpinco

Expedition Leader
My point was that a V8 was standard production, not "specialized" with the associated SVX mark-up. In fact a V8 cost adder should be less than today's MHEV I6 cost adder which we have estimated to be in the $7K-$8K range.
 

A.J.M

Explorer
Has it been 100% confirmed that it will be a SVR only option?

Ive not found anything that says it’s only SVR, just that they are sticking a V8 in it.
And likely the 3.0 6 cylinder diesels next year.
 

umbertob

Adventurer
Nothing has been confirmed yet, so far we only have some footage of a V8 110 running around on the 'ring. Surely the V8 will be introduced eventually (don't know if a Defender needs a SV version, but with Bowler in the mix who knows) and will definitely command a premium over the other engines, just like it does in every car or truck from any other manufacturer. I was thinking they may have waited until the D130 launched to introduce a V8 across the range, but strangely there isn't much talk or spy shots of a 130 anymore, and I wonder if it's still in the cards. Hopefully it is, because a lot of existing Disco/LR3 and 4 owners have only one main complaint about the new 110 Defender, not enough cargo room behind the second row. The 130 would address those concerns (although the spare tire would probably have to go back under the car.)
 

Carson G

Active member
Nothing has been confirmed yet, so far we only have some footage of a V8 110 running around on the 'ring. Surely the V8 will be introduced eventually (don't know if a Defender needs a SV version, but with Bowler in the mix who knows) and will definitely command a premium over the other engines, just like it does in every car or truck from any other manufacturer. I was thinking they may have waited until the D130 launched to introduce a V8 across the range, but strangely there isn't much talk or spy shots of a 130 anymore, and I wonder if it's still in the cards. Hopefully it is, because a lot of existing Disco/LR3 and 4 owners have only one main complaint about the new 110 Defender, not enough cargo room behind the second row. The 130 would address those concerns (although the spare tire would probably have to go back under the car.)
Yeah a 130 would be ideal IMO coming from a D3 and D4. Especially if they keep the spare tire on the back door. That should make some room for an aux fuel tank aft of the back axle.
 

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TexasTJ

Climbing Nerd
On an LR3 with Lift rods you still have access mode with you Lift rods on. Granted it’s 2” higher that normal access mode but you alway have three selectable setting.
 
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