Land Rover ideas for Jeeps

jscherb

Expedition Leader
Earlier this month I posted about Land Rover ambulances converted to campers: https://expeditionportal.com/forum/threads/land-rover-ideas-for-jeeps.218029/page-80#post-3055194

This post isn't a Land Rover idea for a Jeep, it's a Land Rover camper idea for the U.S. ;)

I was out doing errands this morning and came across this one for sale at a small 4wd shop in Corning, NY.









It's a '91, LHD and supposedly has less than 50k miles on it. Looking in the window, it appears that the interior may be more or less stock ambulance but it's hard to see all the way inside. Seems like a great candidate for a camper conversion.

In case anyone's interested:

 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
The September issue of SEMA News has cover story was about electric conversions of vehicles and the cover vehicle was a Defender:



The December issue of Land Rover Monthly arrived the other day and the cover story is also about electric conversions:



The conversion uses the electrical components from a Nissan Leaf and provides adapters/brackets to mount those components in the Land Rover.







The article talks about all the wonderful advantages and performance of the conversion, but does say "...there's one big caveat, though. And that's it's range - just 60 miles from the 30kWh battery pack, which isn't wonderful." Well, other than that, it sounds great.

I wonder when we'll see electric conversion kits for Jeeps?

The 2022 SEMA Show is next week in Las Vegas. It'll feature a section on vehicle electrification: https://www.sema.org/news-media/ene...hicle-electrification-trends-and-technologies

I'll be at the show and will report things that I find interesting.

BTW if anyone wants to browse the show floor plan to see which vendors are exhibiting, SEMA offers an interactive floor plan web site: https://sema22.mapyourshow.com/8_0/floorplan/, feel free to browse around. The SEMA Show is an industry-only event, you need to be in the industry or a SEMA member to attend, but last year SEMA instituted a new policy allowing anyone into the show on the last day (Friday next week). I think the admission charge is $70 for the day. So if you're not a SEMA member, you've got $70 in your pocket to spare and you're near Las Vegas you can get into the show next Friday.
 

AggieOE

Trying to escape the city
I like the trend but would WAY rather see a hybrid battery aftermarket option where you could swap between EV and gas for maximum range and usability.
 

Correus

Adventurer
I know of someone getting ready to convert a 1951 LR SI to an EV, base cost is $40K. If they add all the other things he wants add - they aren't even close to original spec, such as power steering and AC - it will be closer to $70-$80K. Why ruin a classic....
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
A Land Rover was not the idea for my Jeep...

I came across this photo of a Defender in one of the magazines the other day:



It reminded me of this photo:



People accuse me of designing the LJ Safari Cab to make a Jeep look like a Defender/Series Land Rover. The Land Rover and the LJ in those photos do look a bit alike, but honestly the Defender wasn't on my mind when I did the design of the Safari Cab.

For some years before I designed and built the Safari Cab, I had a CJ-8 with a "World Cab" hardtop. This was a hardtop that Jeep built for export markets and was never sold retail in the U.S. Here's an ad for a World Cab next to a photo of my LJ...



I liked the World Cab a lot but didn't really like the CJ-8 as a daily driver, especially for long distances, so I bought an LJ and decided to make it look like the Scrambler. A comparison:



One feature that many Land Rovers have that the Jeep World Cab doesn't are the small windows on either side of the rear door. They're also part of my Safari Cab design, but they weren't inspired by the Land Rover either - they were inspired by the early Meyers and other brand CJ hardtops from the 50's/early 60's:



I've gotten a lot of inspiration for Jeep things from the Land Rover world, which was the reason I started this thread, but the Safari Cab was not born out of Land Rover inspirations :).

I do admit to using two Land Rover parts in my JKU Safari Cab design though... the Alpine windows in the roof are from a Discovery 1, although I changed the orientation - on the Disco the wide part of the glass is vertical but I designed my Safari Cab to use the wide part of the windows horizontally.



The other Disco parts I used in the JKU Safari Cab are a HomeLink transmitter and the power window switches (which I use to activate the Safari Cab's power vent windows).



No Land Rovers were harmed in the making of the Safari Cab, the Discos were already in the junkyard :).
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
This was in a recent issue of Land Rover Owner, it's from Camp Cover:



And I saw this one at SEMA a few weeks ago, this one's from Overland Vehicle Systems:



I'm wondering exactly how much benefit these covers provide. The second one above looks like it would allow rain to run down inside the canvas, which might lead to rust on the tank. The first one has a zipper top which would probably prevent most water entry.

Anyone have opinions about these covers? I ask because when I carry my two-burner propane stove, I have a tank mount that I can bolt to the hinges of either Jeep or my trailer. If the cover has real benefit, maybe I'll sew one.



Here's another product from Camp Cover (https://www.campcover.co.za/), it was in the November issue of Land Rover Owner. Looks like a useful product, maybe I'll sew one to add to my overlanding kit.

 

pith helmet

Well-known member
I think it’s main purpose is aesthetics. I would imagine the metal strap in the picture and any other rub points would destroy it in a few 1000 miles.
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
This seems like a good idea. From the October issue of Land Rover Owner:



Some fridges have Bluetooth now so you can monitor them from your phone but my older Dometics don't. One of my Dometics has Wifi which really doesn't work well with my Android phone and my other Dometic has nothing, so a monitor like this might be worth having. Here's one I found on Amazon




There are many devices like this on the market - some are Bluetooth and work with phones so those might be better if there isn't a convenient location to keep the base station in the Jeep.
 

1000arms

Well-known member
This seems like a good idea. From the October issue of Land Rover Owner:



Some fridges have Bluetooth now so you can monitor them from your phone but my older Dometics don't. One of my Dometics has Wifi which really doesn't work well with my Android phone and my other Dometic has nothing, so a monitor like this might be worth having. Here's one I found on Amazon




There are many devices like this on the market - some are Bluetooth and work with phones so those might be better if there isn't a convenient location to keep the base station in the Jeep.
For home use, one might consider a triple transmitter version. One transmitter in the fridge, one in the freezer, and one outside. This could be done on the road too, if one has the space for the base unit.

One could get two units for use with a trailer. Mount a base unit in the trailer and the second base unit in the the tow vehicle.

I suggest keeping the transmitters in a Ziploc bag, or 2, or 3, especially if one decides to place a transmitter in a cooler with ice.
 

Florida Native

Active member
I use these little guys. Add them it to your list as they go on sale fairly often and sometimes you can save a bit on a two pack.

Govee Hygrometer Thermometer, Wireless Thermometer, Mini Bluetooth Humidity Sensor with Notification Alert, Data Storage and Export, 262 Feet Connecting Range https://a.co/d/42reFuZ

They are very small so easy to fit anywhere. With one in my travel trailer fridge, I can still connect to it via Bluetooth with my phone in the front of the tow vehicle.

-Mike
 

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