Land Rover ideas for Jeeps

jscherb

Expedition Leader
Ever since the early Series models, Land Rovers have had full rear doors, often called "barn doors." It makes access to the cargo area so easy I don't know why they never caught on in the Jeep world. Barn doors have been part of the Land Rover since the 1950's. This one's on a Series III Land Rover from the 70's:



A Swiss Post Office Land Rover:



Jeep teased us with a barn door on the jeep Africa concept a few years ago:



But the closest Jeep ever got to a production barn door for this country was on the postal Jeep of the 60's/70's:



Jeep did produce a barn door for export only, it was called the "World Cab" and was available in CJ7 and CJ8 versions. This is an ad from the UK:



And Mahindra in India, which has always produced cool Jeep variants, has barn doors on all of its long wheelbase jeeps. This one is a Savari:



But no factory barn doors in the U.S.

When I designed and built the LJ/TJ Safari Cab hardtop and the JK/JKU Safari Cab, a barn door was at the top of my design requirements list.





I designed the JK barn door to also work with the factory JK/JKU hardtop in case someone ever wanted one for a factory top. It also works with the Ursa Minor camper top since that was derived from a factory top. Here's a barn door I did for Donny's Ursa Minor:



I've done two different barn door designs for the factory TJ hardtop as well but I haven't made the molds for that one.

Maybe some future Wrangler will offer a barn door as an option, but I doubt it.
 

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jscherb

Expedition Leader
I wish jeep would make one with an electric roll down window. like on the old station wagons
How about a "soft barn door"? It works the same as soft uppers for half doors, it's easy to install/remove and it's thin enough to store between the top of the roll bad and the underside of the hardtop roof when removed. There are two in these photos, the Spice (tan) one has a fixed soft window and the camo one has a soft window that rolls down (sorry, it's not electric :)).



It also works with a factory hardtop as you can see above.

On the left below the soft window zipper up, on the right it's rolled down and held in place with straps.

 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
Back to the ground anchor topic... here's another way a ground anchor could be made - when I'm on the trail I carry 4 aluminum sand ladders. They could be adapted to be ground anchor plates, which would eliminate having to carry a specific ground anchor plate - only the stakes and the bolt-on attachment point for the sand ladders would need to be carried. A quick concept sketch:



I've already done a mod to the sand ladders so they can function as bridges, in this photo I'm testing them in a culvert...



I added bolt-on channels to the underside for use when needed as bridges, when used as sand ladders the channels are removed:



So why not adapt them for ground anchor use as well?
 

Hristo34

Member
More on awnings from the Land Rover magazines - here's a simple one to implement, no sewing, just some straps, stakes and guy lines.



Another interesting design, this one requires a roof rack rail to mount to though:


I use a tarp set up off the back of my LJ very similar to that green Defender. It was inexpensive, takes up very little space in my gear, and can be put up in less than 5 minutes. I sleep inside my LJ so that is the extent of my set up. There are some interesting ideas in this thread, keep them coming!
 

Bobzdar

Observer
Back to the ground anchor topic... here's another way a ground anchor could be made - when I'm on the trail I carry 4 aluminum sand ladders. They could be adapted to be ground anchor plates, which would eliminate having to carry a specific ground anchor plate - only the stakes and the bolt-on attachment point for the sand ladders would need to be carried. A quick concept sketch:



I've already done a mod to the sand ladders so they can function as bridges, in this photo I'm testing them in a culvert...



I added bolt-on channels to the underside for use when needed as bridges, when used as sand ladders the channels are removed:



So why not adapt them for ground anchor use as well?

This is a great idea - 3 uses in one. Definitely an idea I'd look at - could use both to spread the load in really difficult ground as well. You may have just convinced me to buy some sand ladders and some big ass tent spikes (which I need anyway). I'm also thinking in soupy stuff or snow you could actually pound the sand ladders into the ground vertically and use them as a winch anchor.
 
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jscherb

Expedition Leader
This could be useful in the wild for some people...



It's about $45 but could be done a lot cheaper - stools like this are available for about fifteen bucks: https://www.target.com/p/coleman-rambler-ii-stool-brown/-/A-77432010 and it wouldn't take much to make a new fabric seat for it - could be done in two layers of fabric - a solid piece of fabric for when it's used as a normal stool, and the top fabric would fold back for use for more private purposes. A two layer fabric design would make the stool useful around the campsite with it's not being used for it's "holey" purpose and so would better justify the cargo space it takes up.

I drew it to show how it might work, it could be something like this:



Could even be a simple product for some company, they could make just the replacement cloth that would fit most of this type of stool - recycle an old stool into a dual-purpose stool.

The text at on the at Target linked to above says "Roomy 15.5-in. cloth seat offers hours of comfort". Let's hope someone in the wild doesn't need it for that long :).
 

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Bobs85Reny

New member
How about a "soft barn door"? It works the same as soft uppers for half doors, it's easy to install/remove and it's thin enough to store between the top of the roll bad and the underside of the hardtop roof when removed. There are two in these photos, the Spice (tan) one has a fixed soft window and the camo one has a soft window that rolls down (sorry, it's not electric :)).



It also works with a factory hardtop as you can see above.

On the left below the soft window zipper up, on the right it's rolled down and held in place with straps.

I like that idea. Does it work with a soft top. My wife hates the soft top because its such a pain to access the back of the jeep with the zip out window.
 
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