Kitchen Kit/Chuck Box

the_alias

New member
Mainly signed up here because wanted to see more Chuckbox/Patrol box ideas.

Thought I'd share my almost finished one as way of thanks to everyone on this forum for ideas and inspiration.

Mine isn't super pretty, I made a ton of mistakes going along but it is functional and not too heavy. Had never done anything like this before but with a friend some reading, and patience we got there.

I've got to decide how to secure the shelves (thinking probably shockcord) and maybe added some thin sheet metal to where the stove sits.

 

Scoutman

Explorer
I've been conceptualizing an 80/20 aluminum extrusion chuck box for some time now trying to figure out how to make it all work. I've made and used home made wooden boxes, pelican cases of various sizes, plano 56qt bins, and lately wolfpack boxes. I've never been truly happy with any of them and that was mainly because I typically operate off the back of my truck and every one of these required moving around, pulling lids off, and ended up a cavity of gear when things got scrambled. I've been toying with dividers for the wolfpack box lately but have kept this 80/20 project going in the background hoping it would be the final solution (if there ever is one). My wife hates the wolfpack boxes the most so convenience and access is key.

This is where I'm at now and am starting to put some pieces together over the past few days. I use this stuff at work a lot so I'm familiar with it and all the various connectors. I also have the ability to laser cut the walls/shelves for an exact fit. I still have to sort out wall/shelf material and a door latch but this has most of the details pinned down. I've decided to go with a removable swing door that's lined on the inside with sheet loop material so I can velcro pouches to it storing common kitchen items. Most of the dimensions of the box are driven from the width of the stove or the accumulated height of what we typically carry. I'm trying to give myself enough flexibility that if we want to rearrange items we can. Easy to clean, robust, and hold everything in one place are all things I'm going for. The most this typically moves is from the garage to the back of the truck and back again.

I'm looking at making the walls out of either 1/4" ply with a gasket, 1/4" coroplast (corrugated plastic sheet), ABS sheet, or ???. The shelves are supported by pilaster shelf strips with clips (screwed to the shelves) and are tucked into the corners of the main box. I will also work on some slot brackets on the sides so legs can be slipped in to make it freestanding. Thinking of using footman loops so they can double as tie downs.

Overkill? Probably, but given the price of some other kitchen kits out there this will be well under the cost of those and custom fit to my gear. I don't really see using 80/20 as a waste of space when compared to the walls of a pelican or wolfpack box as they are easily 1", although I'm sure it could be made thinner and lighter with just 1/4" ply. To each their own, do what makes you happy, suits your purpose, yada, yada....

Outside dimensions are 24.5" wide, 15" deep, and 22" tall.

campboxsnip.JPG

campboxsnip2.JPG


campboxsnip3.JPG
 
Last edited:

mtntrekker

Observer
I've been conceptualizing an 80/20 aluminum extrusion chuck box for some time now trying to figure out how to make it all work. I've made and used home made wooden boxes, pelican cases of various sizes, plano 56qt bins, and lately wolfpack boxes. I've never been truly happy with any of them and that was mainly because I typically operate off the back of my truck and every one of these required moving around, pulling lids off, and ended up a cavity of gear when things got scrambled. I've been toying with dividers for the wolfpack box lately but have kept this 80/20 project going in the background hoping it would be the final solution (if there ever is one). My wife hates the wolfpack boxes the most so convenience and access is key.

This is where I'm at now and am starting to put some pieces together over the past few days. I use this stuff at work a lot so I'm familiar with it and all the various connectors. I also have the ability to laser cut the walls/shelves for an exact fit. I still have to sort out wall/shelf material and a door latch but this has most of the details pinned down. I've decided to go with a removable swing door that's lined on the inside with sheet loop material so I can velcro pouches to it storing common kitchen items. Most of the dimensions of the box are driven from the width of the stove or the accumulated height of what we typically carry. I'm trying to give myself enough flexibility that if we want to rearrange items we can. Easy to clean, robust, and hold everything in one place are all things I'm going for. The most this typically moves is from the garage to the back of the truck and back again.

I'm looking at making the walls out of either 1/4" ply with a gasket, 1/4" coroplast (corrugated plastic sheet), ABS sheet, or ???. The shelves are supported by pilaster shelf strips with clips (screwed to the shelves) and are tucked into the corners of the main box. I will also work on some slot brackets on the sides so legs can be slipped in to make it freestanding. Thinking of using footman loops so they can double as tie downs.

Overkill? Probably, but given the price of some other kitchen kits out there this will be well under the cost of those and custom fit to my gear. I don't really see using 80/20 as a waste of space when compared to the walls of a pelican or wolfpack box as they are easily 1", although I'm sure it could be made thinner and lighter with just 1/4" ply. To each their own, do what makes you happy, suits your purpose, yada, yada....

Outside dimensions are 24.5" wide, 15" deep, and 22" tall.

View attachment 591829

View attachment 591830


View attachment 591831
How will you attach the pilaster shelf strips to the extrusion?
Have you thought out how you will do a latch and what type?
Thanks
Dale
 

Scoutman

Explorer
The shelf strips are attached with #6 flat head screws to the inside of the side walls and not to the extrusion.

As for a latch, I've looked at everything from Southco and 80/20 but haven't decided exactly what I want to use just yet.

Here's where I'm at using laser cut cardboard as prototype fill panels.


Sent from my SM-G986U using Tapatalk
 

mtntrekker

Observer
The shelf strips are attached with #6 flat head screws to the inside of the side walls and not to the extrusion.

As for a latch, I've looked at everything from Southco and 80/20 but haven't decided exactly what I want to use just yet.

Here's where I'm at using laser cut cardboard as prototype fill panels.


Sent from my SM-G986U using Tapatalk
how long are the #6 screws?
Thanks again
 

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Scoutman

Explorer
how long are the #6 screws?
Thanks again
The panel I'm using is 1/4" thick and the pilaster shelf strips are ~3/16" but an 82* countersunk head doesn't fit in them as deep as it should so I ended up purchasing 1/2" philips flat head 18-8 stainless steel undercut head in a #6-32 thread. I'm going to tap the side walls to mount them. If you were using a wood product you could use a #6 x 1/2" flat head wood screw but it would have a point sticking through the outside of the panel that you would need to grind down.

My concern with my next chuck box is overall weight of the box. Is yours lightweight?
Assuming you were asking me....
I loaded all the contents I had with the few filler panels I have cut so far and the short answer is no it is not lightweight. That is partly because the filler panels are heavier than they need to be (but I will probably swap those for lighter panels in the future once I find something I like). Also a fully loaded 10 piece Magma cook set is ~13# so weight adds up quickly. My main goal wasn't to have the lightest camp box around, it was to have everything in one place at the convenience of my tailgate. Up till now I've had a cooking kit box, stove in in a separate truck box, and the wash pans in a different spot. This will also make it easier for kids/wife to find things.

The weight of a 10 series extrusion is ~.0424 pounds per inch. I have 222" of extrusion which puts the skeleton being ~9.4# without corner blocks and hardware. Then add panels, hinges, latch and contents and it adds up. This will end up being a 2 person load item and I'm fine with that.

If you want a light camp box, start with lightweight contents. ;)
 

slomatt

Adventurer
For about 15 years I have stored my kitchen gear in a an Akro-Mils box with a folding lid. It has held up great, but I've always been annoyed at having to pull everything out to get to my stove which lived in the bottom of the box. Also, the lid doesn't seal very well and is definitely not water or dust proof. One major bonus of the Akro-Mils box is that it fits into the back of my 4Runner perfectly with zero wasted space on the sides.

This year I decided it was time to re-think my kitchen storage and I came up with the following requirements:
  • Needs to be portable (aka lightweight). Drawer kitchens are great if you want fast deployment, but for multiple reasons I don't like cooking out of the back of the truck.
  • Should be reasonably weather proof. It's not going on the roof, but I want to be able to leave it out in the rain or in dusty environments.
  • Inexpensive and easy to replace. Zarges boxes are awesome, but they are overkill for my use and I want something that I don't need to worry about if it gets dinged.
  • Easy access to all items. Not necessary "first order retrievable", but getting to specific items should be easy and not require unpacking everything.
After taking some measurements I decided to go with a Plano 1719 storage trunk which checked most of my requirements: lightweight, reasonably weatherproof (I added a bulb seal), and inexpensive. One downside is that my stove no longer fits, so I purchased a storage bag from Bass Pro Shops which is working well.

The gotcha with the Plano is that you still run into problems with easily accessing items since it's just a big empty space. I solved this by making a toolbox-style tray out of 3/8" baltic birch plywood. This way small items stay in the tray where they are easily accessed, and larger items are stored below. The tray can be quickly lifted up, turned 90 degrees, and set on the box while large items are retrieved. This way nothing gets set in the dirt, or balanced precariously on a rock. I've used this setup on several trips so far and really like the way it is working out.

The tray. I've since added a divider in the bottom section to separate the cutlery from the cooking utensils. The plywood is finished with Shellac and each compartment is lined with BPA free shelf liner.



The bottom section contains a set of Magma nesting pots, frying pan, and a washtub that holds my plates, bowls, cutting boards, cups, etc.



Here are the contents of the washtub.



Pots and pans



And the contents of the top tray.



More pictures can be found at the following site if anybody is interested. I also customized another Plano 1719 for my camping gear and may post pictures of that in the future.
 
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