-->

JK130 | Custom TDI Diesel Parallel Hybrid Jeep Wrangler with composite camper build.

straypoet

Member
I know in Australia they can legitimately increase GVWR of the rigs, which they do on some jeeps, may just be a suspension thing or something more substantial, not sure.
If talking about physical weight carrying capacity, I think that converting to 2.5" coil overs will help there. Maybe the most important thing to upgrade is actually the brakes.
The existing wrangler brakes just aren't going to cut it. I plan to switch to the 'big brake kit' to go to dual-piston calipers.

If legally changing the GVWR is what you mean, I understand you can do that in Florida (where I live), but I haven't actually done any real research yet.
 

nickw

Adventurer
If talking about physical weight carrying capacity, I think that converting to 2.5" coil overs will help there. Maybe the most important thing to upgrade is actually the brakes.
The existing wrangler brakes just aren't going to cut it. I plan to switch to the 'big brake kit' to go to dual-piston calipers.

If legally changing the GVWR is what you mean, I understand you can do that in Florida (where I live), but I haven't actually done any real research yet.
I was just pointing out in Australia the GVWR is somehow increased from US spec and from the std spec....wasn't sure what they did to do that, they have pretty strict requirements there, I remember reading something about it and I don't believe it was any structural changes.....

Good call on the brakes - probably are some simple axle upgrades you could do if required...
 

Jurfie

Adventurer
Speaking of axles, I don’t recall reading what your plans are for those (apologies if I missed it). Given that your rig looks to be a non-Rubicon, your front is a D30. With that extra weight, I’d recommend at least trussing and sleeving, but I‘d be willing to bet to legally increase your GVWR you’ll need to upgrade them. Give one of the recertification shops a call to find out before shelling out any cash. Throw some junkyard tons under there and call ‘er done; given your skills, you should be able to handle the swap easily enough.

This is an awesome, well thought out project, BTW. 👍
 

greg.potter

Adventurer
The short answer is that yes, it is trial and error.

The long answer is this:

The back-of-the-envelope math gives me an expected final curb-weight of between 5,000lbs, and 5700lbs. If I leave myself 800lbs of cargo capacity, (myself, food, fuel, some tools ect) the Gross Weight should fall between 5,800lbs and 6,500lbs. I want to be on the LOW SIDE of that number. The JK has a boxed frame; and I believe the frame can handle the weight, the axles maybe are the weak point here.
I am at 6500 pounds fully loaded for a trip with all of my camping equipment, roof top tent, a full main tank and my aux tank filled - there's a free government scale on the highway on my way to the mountains. I have a 2012 4 door Rubicon so it has the D44 axles and I am running an AEV 4 inch suspension and 37 inch Cooper Discoverer STT MAXX tires. My perspective is the Rubicon axles (particularly the front axle), are marginal for this application, which in my case is not rock crawling, but includes some rough forest service roads and moderate trails. I have had to replace and upgrade all of my steering components including the steering box, the unit bearings and the front u-joints once in a little over 100,000 miles and things are starting to feel a little "loose" again. I am planning on keeping this jeep for a long time and am thinking that the next upgrade may be a set of D60 axles with bigger everything on them. I know that everything wears out eventually but having the increased durability would provide some additional peace of mind.
 

straypoet

Member
One of the concepts I was thinking about is your 125" wheelbase idea vs 120" If you keep the body length the same, but by extending the wheelbase you will have less weight behind the rear axle. Making loading and weight bias easier to achieve. I should send you a photo of Wildland fire truck we have on an F550 chassis. The diesel powered fire pump and motor are mounted at and behind the rear axle. Even with it being 2000lbs under GVW it is a handful to drive because the rear bias lifts the front suspension.
I think you are right. I stayed with 125"
Here it is all welded up and locked down.

tempImageBP2NtE.jpg

Never going to move again that is for sure. It took about all that two 4ton come-allongs could do to pull it together:IMG_2905.jpegIMG_2904.jpeg

Currently working on moving the rear cab-mounts forward 30", and then I will paint the frame, and then run my new brake lines.
 

straypoet

Member
Update:

Ordered 50ft of new 1/4" copper-nickel (just as corrosion resistant as stainless, but easier to work with) brake lines, and the fittings I need. $50
Bought some shop supplies for the project from Harbor Freight $50 (mostly replacement grinding wheels, wire brush wheels, and flap disks)
Bought 1/4" nylon stand-offs for the brake lines. $15 (much more than it should have cost)
Total: $115

My tires came in.

IMG_2914.jpeg



They weigh 75lbs each.


IMG_2912.jpeg

I cut off the rear cab mounts, and will be welding them back on tomorrow. Then I will prime and paint.
 
Last edited:

straypoet

Member
Speaking of axles, I don’t recall reading what your plans are for those (apologies if I missed it). Given that your rig looks to be a non-Rubicon, your front is a D30. With that extra weight, I’d recommend at least trussing and sleeving, but I‘d be willing to bet to legally increase your GVWR you’ll need to upgrade them. Give one of the recertification shops a call to find out before shelling out any cash. Throw some junkyard tons under there and call ‘er done; given your skills, you should be able to handle the swap easily enough.

This is an awesome, well thought out project, BTW. 👍
Yes, you are correct: non rubicon, so just D30 up there.
for axles, I am going to wait to see what I weigh when nearing completion. I would like to do lockers, so a rubicon axle swap would be in order if my weights are low-ish.
If high, then a D60 swap seems like a good idea. I will keep my options open, you never know what might show up at the junkyard.
 

straypoet

Member
EFE4F429-2EBC-4446-9B16-46D180FA01B9.jpg

Now that my wheelbase is fully decided and the frame extension is welded in place, I did another scale mock-up, this time with the 125" wheel base.
The camper still seems large, but I just can't seem to find any-other way to get the 122" I need for the solar, so this is where I am headed.

The AC that I intend to build will go in-between the cab, and the camper box. (The angled area on top)
At least that is what I currently intend. We will see. I may change this if weight on-top becomes an issue. ( really don't want this to be top-heavy, and I will have 130ish lbs of solar panels up there.)
 
Last edited:

straypoet

Member
Can you bring that roof forward over the cab to get the solar panel room you want?
I think I can get a few inches; but the issue with that then becomes mostly aesthetic, as the width of the camper is about 6" wider than the width of the jeep at the doors on each side, it may look a bit weird.
I do have a certain desire to keep the looks as symmetrical and elegant as possible, but function is more valued than form.

I will test this idea out. Even if I can shorten the over-all length by a little bit, it will help.
Thank you for the suggestion.
 
Last edited:

mog

Kodiak Wrangler
Now that my wheelbase is fully decided and the frame extension is welded in place, I did another scale mock-up, this time with the 125" wheel base.
The camper still seems large, but I just can't seem to find any-other way to get the 122" I need for the solar, so this is where I am headed.
I think the size looks good. These have cabins perhaps larger than your plan and they are very balanced IMO.
I think these are about 131" wheelbase


sample01.jpg sample02.jpg sample03.jpg sample04.jpg sample05.jpg sample06.jpg sample07.jpg
 

wADVr

Adventurer
I think you are right. I stayed with 125"
Here it is all welded up and locked down.

View attachment 651258

Never going to move again that is for sure. It took about all that two 4ton come-allongs could do to pull it together:View attachment 651261View attachment 651262

Currently working on moving the rear cab-mounts forward 30", and then I will paint the frame, and then run my new brake lines.
great work on this! Question though and possibly already mentioned it, what fuel tank are you going to use? And do you plan on adding more crossmembers like the JKU has? I’d have to crawl under mine but it has at least one more crossmember holding the fuel tank up
 

straypoet

Member
great work on this! Question though and possibly already mentioned it, what fuel tank are you going to use? And do you plan on adding more crossmembers like the JKU has? I’d have to crawl under mine but it has at least one more crossmember holding the fuel tank up
I will definitely add another crossmember. I need a driveshaft carrier bearing since I don’t want that long of a driveshaft, so I am intending to crawl under a gladiator and check out how it is set up. Might be able to use that arrangement. In any case yeah, I will be adding another support.

I intend to build my own aluminum diesel tanks. ( Unless I can find inexpensive 20 gallon rectangular plastic tanks that will fit) They will be mounted behind the front cab, under the camper. I will fab them up, and figure out mounting once the engine is in, and the driveline is sorted out. ( that way I can be sure I have clearance)

I intend to have dual 20 gallon tanks. So I can carry 40 gallons of Diesel if needed; though I will likely rarely have them both full at the same time.

I will just swap left/right each time I fill up, that way the diesel stays fresh in both tanks. I am hoping to have a 1,000+ mile range with both tanks full.. nice to fill up in Fairbanks, and do the Dalton round-trip without buying fuel on the way.:cool:
 
Last edited:
Top