Jeep just released a JL with a payload increase of 500lbs

T-Willy

Well-known member
As cool as the 4xe is, it's still for the most part 20 year old Prius-like technology, and it's pretty pathetic that it took nearly two decades for that sort of technology to show up in a remote touring vehicle.
 

alanymarce

Well-known member
So, the question is, what will we find over the next couple of years, in terms of whether the increased GVM will break stuff.

Interesting to look at how this will help long trajectories where at present we have to carry extra fuel (PN Eduardo Avaroa, Simpson, etc.)
 

MarcusBrody

Member
As cool as the 4xe is, it's still for the most part 20 year old Prius-like technology, and it's pretty pathetic that it took nearly two decades for that sort of technology to show up in a remote touring vehicle.
The most exciting difference for me is the plug in option and its range. There wasn't a Prius plug in hybrid until 8 years ago or so, and then the plug in only range was 11 miles. This gets over twice that on a MUCH heavier and less aerodynamic vehicle. A 25 mile range would allow me to commute to work and back without using any gasoline and the hybrid tech would allow me to explore long distances. I've held off on a burlier expedition vehicle as I didn't want to pay the mileage penalty on a daily driver (for environmental reasons as much as anything else, buying an older gas guzzler of an SUV would still probably end up cheaper in the long run). I'm really excited for good PEV hybrids to start coming out.
 

Gear

Explorer, Overland Certified OC0020
Pretty sure the Diesel Jeep has a GVWR of 6100 listed on the door sticker.
 

Bobzdar

Observer
If/ when they make a gladiator version, I'm in, provided it can still tow over 5k lbs. I'd imagine it can do something like the rubicon trail almost completely on electric only.
 

dstock

Explorer
I'm a little disappointed that they didn't match the range of the diesel, but still intriguing.
One issue with the diesel, for those of us who want to travel into Mexico, is the lack of ultra low-sulfur diesel availability. Mexico was going to switch over in 2021 but now that's been pushed back until 2024.
 

T-Willy

Well-known member
One issue with the diesel, for those of us who want to travel into Mexico, is the lack of ultra low-sulfur diesel availability. Mexico was going to switch over in 2021 but now that's been pushed back until 2024.
Diesel quality and availability are problems for travel in Mexico, especially along the coast. My last trip down was delayed a few days when the Pemex that my travel partners had planned was out of diesel.
 

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billiebob

Well-known member
This implies that Jeep could reconfigure a 3.6 JLU with a 1700 payload.
For sure, but when they double the payload, they will do things to ensure drivability, safety at that new number. And that will mean limiting articulation, lowering the center of gravity, likely reducing approah/departure/beakover angles. For a manufacturer, increasing payload changes way more than just the springs.
 

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
For sure, but when they double the payload, they will do things to ensure drivability, safety at that new number. And that will mean limiting articulation, lowering the center of gravity, likely reducing approah/departure/beakover angles. For a manufacturer, increasing payload changes way more than just the springs.
But they've just released a JL with a +500lbs payload without doing any of those negative things.

So build a 4xe, but leave out the battery and electric stuff, and you have a wrangler will 500lbs payload more than a regular one...

-Dan
 

billiebob

Well-known member
So build a 4xe, but leave out the battery and electric stuff,
wow yes !!!

give me a 2020 truck with this engine compartment and yeah, I'll buy new

130980_Engine_Web.jpg

But the new JL? is not increasing payload, just GVWR. I know you think it is heavier so lets do it with a lighter version..... but even if you like that idea fact is weight increases stress which affects design life and increases the odds of failure. So yeah, the Wrangler lineup is NOT your best choice if you need more payload..... the Wrangler is built to haul a bit and give reliability to go places no one else focuses on.

Lots of people wish the Super seven had room for more than a tooth brush and swimsuit but if you need a Lincoln, don't buy a Lotus.

Super 7.jpg
 
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shays4me

Adventurer
It will definitely be interesting to find out what steps Jeep took to increase the payload on the new 4xe compared to the standard JLU. That should give people a few ideas for their own mods.
 

Steve F

Adventurer
The JLU in Australia has the same payload (roughly) as those available in the US but has a towing capacity of 5500lb. Even my current 2009 JK (Shortie) has a towing capacity of 3527lb (1600kg). I have a JLU on order at the moment but wouldn't buy it if it couldn't legally tow the 5500lb!!
 

kootenay

Intergalacticsuperintendent
But they've just released a JL with a +500lbs payload without doing any of those negative things.

So build a 4xe, but leave out the battery and electric stuff, and you have a wrangler will 500lbs payload more than a regular one...

-Dan
I have been doing a little digging and looking into this as well. If I go off the FCA Canada press kits on a 2015 Jeep wrangler. The Sport model JK unlimited has a payload rating of 1000lbs and the Rubicon has a payload of 892 and the Sahara is 880. Regardless of transmission and therefor curb weight.
Model Transmission Axle RatioPayloadBase Wt. Base Wt. FrontBase Wt. RearGAWR FrontGAWR Rear
Sport 5-speed Auto3.7310004291 2237205427753200
Sahara6-speed Manual3.7388043972273212427753200
Rubicon6-speed Manual4.1089245212352217027753200
Rubicon5-speed Auto3.7389245352350218527753200

As you can see by the numbers the curb weight difference does not equal the payload difference even between the sport and the Rubicon or Sahara. Interestingly if you take the axle weight ratings of the Rubicon manual (what I own) and were able to load both axles to the their respective maximums, the payload would be 1454lbs. Even just the rear axle rating on the same jeep gives 1030lbs of payload on the rear axle.

If we dig into the tires the stock Sport tire is a Goodyear Wrangler ST p225 75 r16 with a load index of 102 (1874lbs) The optional tire size on the sport has a load rating of 104 . The Rubicon Sahara and optional tire size on the sport all had load index ratings of 104 (1984lbs) So payload rating is not reliant on the the stock tires. It really must come down to suspension settings from the factory?
 
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