Heating a pop-up truck camper?

Durango

Adventurer
Is there risk of CO poisoning with these?
I ran a Mr. Buddy in my previous slide-in FWC Hawk. Catalytic heaters don't really produce carbon monoxide. But they do use up oxygen AND create a lot of interior moisture. With the "porous nature" of pop-up campers neither of these are a great problem. (It is good to crack a skylight.)

What we didn't care for with the catalytic heaters is the lack of a thermostat. So you'll constantly be turning them on and off.

Steve
 

Joeprunc

Observer
@josh41
The furnace should have an auto shut off switch/valve for the propane if (1) there isn't enough electricity to power the fan (2) the pilot light is out (ie no propane). The other week my battery was too low to power the furnace fan (due to the required draw), but would power other accessories like lights and fantastic fan.
 

Cruiser79

Observer
I bought a '95 shadowcruiser pop up without thermo package or anything. What material is used for isolating it a little bit from the inside, or is it better to put some sheets or anything on the outside when camping with temperatures around 0?
I also want to place a Truma boiler/heater combination, running on LPG. Would 4 kW be enough or better to place 6 kW?
 

cninghm

Adventurer

JandDGreens

Adventurer
I was just reading some threads of interest to the camper I am building. I must chime in on the use of the Mr Buddy as a primary or back-up Heater. Well we have had one for ten years and found it useless up here in the Colorado Rockies. The whole time I thought it was just a lemon but one day while I was in Murdoch's I watched a video they had running promoting the heater and found my answer of why it never work for what I bought it for. it has it's own Co2 sensor that shuts it off. After reading the fine print found out it is not recommended for altitudes above X amount ft. (9,000 or something like that) because of this safety feature. Why do they even sell them here in Colorado is beyond me. The Wave heaters do not have this issue as they are very specific on the need to use proper ventilation when using them. Just a FYI for you that are contemplating a cat heater for your heat source.
 
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billy2

New member
First off the buddy heaters are good to go. They have low o2 sensors and will shut off if tipped. But still be careful with it. The insulation I use in my rig is refletics. My top goes up exactly 24 inches and this roll fits perfect.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0009XCJA2/ref=sxr_rr_xsim1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_p=2286650982&pd_rd_wg=TKMJ6&pf_rd_r=83J2EWYJSGGH6G6AKAAZ&pf_rd_s=desktop-rhs-carousels&pf_rd_t=301&pd_rd_i=B0009XCJA2&pd_rd_w=sqkIH&pf_rd_i=reflective+insulation&pd_rd_r=ST343M71QBNTXDMCZ3A1&ie=UTF8&qid=1484775435&sr=1
 

downhill

Adventurer
One point that I think bears mentioning is that catalytic heaters DO produce CO. The level however is below the threshold that the EPA deems "toxic". It is also predicated on the need for ventilation, since the heater consumes oxygen. I found a study done a few years ago that was very thorough; not sure if I saved it. As mentioned by others, moisture is an issue too. I've always (partially) enclosed and vented my cats. I have found them an excellent heat source that draw no electric.
 

JandDGreens

Adventurer
Regardless of what kind (I stand corrected) My point is that the sensor on the little buddy heater at high altitude renders it useless above 7,000 ft. as the oxygen is so thin. But other similar heaters don't have this safety feature.
 
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JaSAn

Active member
Anyone who has an open flame in a camper should have a CO detector. They're cheap insurance; so you don't wake up with drain bamage. I think I paid $23 for a battery operated First Alert CO/Smoke detector.

jim
 

JandDGreens

Adventurer
My plan is to use a Wave-3 and have plenty of vents for fresh air. I also will have it insulated the best I can. Also will be installing a co/gas detector to be safe when the heater is in use.
 

craig333

Expedition Leader
FWC has been installing CO detectors for a very long time. Remember, they have a limited lifetime. I had to replace mine after five years.
 

JandDGreens

Adventurer
FWC has been installing CO detectors for a very long time. Remember, they have a limited lifetime. I had to replace mine after five years.
This is a very good point to bring up. As I found that out when my Co detector started acting up last year. I was terrified as my son and daughter both sleep in the basement, everything checked out fine but the detector kept going off. So I investigated what the problem through the internet and found that the Co detector was expired and was the problem. Manufacturers recommend X amount of years on most Smoke/Co/gas detectors.
 
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ETAV8R

Founder of D.E.R.P.
On my past two trips I used my Buddy heater. New Years in Death Valley was in the mid to high 30s and I only used it before bed and in the morning. This was the first trip I've ever had real condensation inside the camper. I've got the "arctic pack" and while it gives another layer to theoretically keep temps warmer I would imagine reflectex is much better.
 
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