Give a Dreamer Advice

Martinjmpr

Wiffleball Batter
"Vintage" rigs are great to dream about. Actually owning one is a different matter. BTDT.
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Do you want a vehicle to use or do you want a project to work on? Because unless you are a master mechanic with a garage full of tools, any vehicle older than 1980 is going to be about 5% of the first and 95% of the 2nd. ;)
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EDITED TO ADD: Of course, with enough money and time, anything is possible. But you said yourself that money was an issue. How are your mechanical skills?
 
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Martinjmpr

Wiffleball Batter
Thanks!

yeah I've been looking at the IHs, but I've never heard of them until recently when I saw one on instagram. What's a general perception of them?
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I've owned two, a 1957 and a 1967. Both were tough and rugged, no-frills machines of their era. Electrical problems were common, and body rust and rot was an issue even in dry Colorado. Fun to own at times but more often than not my friends were the ones who ended up driving because we couldn't really "trust" my old vehicles.
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Put another way, if you buy one, don't ever drive it further than you're willing to walk back. ;)
 

trd

Observer
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I've owned two, a 1957 and a 1967. Both were tough and rugged, no-frills machines of their era. Electrical problems were common, and body rust and rot was an issue even in dry Colorado. Fun to own at times but more often than not my friends were the ones who ended up driving because we couldn't really "trust" my old vehicles.
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Put another way, if you buy one, don't ever drive it further than you're willing to walk back. ;)
well **** :lmao:

My mechanical skills are non existent. Meaning, I can do anything, I just don't know how until you tell me (relating to vehicles). My brother-in-law on the other hand, is a certified mechanic in two countries.
 

Martinjmpr

Wiffleball Batter
OK, so am I assuming you have a more modern rig now, you are just looking for a hobby-type rig?
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If so, here's my recommendation: Learn to ride a motorcycle if you don't know how already. Then buy an old bike for $500 or less. I'd recommend an old Kawasaki or Honda 4 cyl from the late 70's to the mid 80's. There's dozens of them on CL and the parts are still mostly available online or at your local motorcycle junkyard.
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If you can successfully rehabilitate that old bike and bring it back from the dead, then move on to a 4 wheeled vehicle. The bike will take up less space in the garage, require less expensive parts, and be easier to work on. You can use it to find out if you really have the patience and perseverance to pursue a dream like this.
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If you're like most of us (me included), that bike will sit there until you finally decide to get rid of it because you never have time to work on it. Going through that evolution with a 4x4 will take up more space, more money and more time.
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Now don't laugh, I'm serious! If you have the patience to bring an old Kawasaki 1000 or Honda 750 back to life after years of neglect, then you might have the patience to bring that old Jeep or corn binder back to life. ;)
 

trd

Observer
OK, so am I assuming you have a more modern rig now, you are just looking for a hobby-type rig?
.
If so, here's my recommendation: Learn to ride a motorcycle if you don't know how already. Then buy an old bike for $500 or less. I'd recommend an old Kawasaki or Honda 4 cyl from the late 70's to the mid 80's. There's dozens of them on CL and the parts are still mostly available online or at your local motorcycle junkyard.
.
If you can successfully rehabilitate that old bike and bring it back from the dead, then move on to a 4 wheeled vehicle. The bike will take up less space in the garage, require less expensive parts, and be easier to work on. You can use it to find out if you really have the patience and perseverance to pursue a dream like this.
.
If you're like most of us (me included), that bike will sit there until you finally decide to get rid of it because you never have time to work on it. Going through that evolution with a 4x4 will take up more space, more money and more time.
.
Now don't laugh, I'm serious! If you have the patience to bring an old Kawasaki 1000 or Honda 750 back to life after years of neglect, then you might have the patience to bring that old Jeep or corn binder back to life. ;)
No that's great advice. I have a motorcycle, 2016 Multistrada Enduro... and I wouldn't attempt to do anything service-related on my own, partly because of how electronic everything is.

I should probably wait a little while, and look out for a 2nd owner already restored vehicle.
 

trd

Observer
With that said, if you're taking a vintage chassis, and putting a relatively newer carb engine + tranny... what maintenance nightmare would you be looking at on top of any other 70-80's era vehicle?
 

Comanche Scott

Expedition Leader
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I've owned two, a 1957 and a 1967. Both were tough and rugged, no-frills machines of their era. Electrical problems were common, and body rust and rot was an issue even in dry Colorado. Fun to own at times but more often than not my friends were the ones who ended up driving because we couldn't really "trust" my old vehicles.
.
Put another way, if you buy one, don't ever drive it further than you're willing to walk back. ;)
x2 on the rust & electrical.

You'd want one that someone took it to bare metal then coated inside & out. I don't think I.H. believed in galvanized sheet metal... lol
A Travelall or Travelette with an LS swap, or maybe the new Cummins R2.8L, and a new body harness would be a sweet vehicle. They are built very tough. :)

If you go to www.binderplanet.com, there are quite a few I.H. clubs in Texas
Some very cool people who are very helpful.
http://www.binderplanet.com/forums/index.php#ih-clubs.159
If you're willing to work hard and learn, these guys would be great mentors, and a heck of a lot of fun to hang out with.
 

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Airmapper

High-Tech Redneck
I had big ideas of messing with and driving vintage Bronco's. A '66 and a '70. One to learn on and one to do right. Now I have 2 inoperable Broncos and 2 rice burners that I can actually take places.....and just keeping up on maintenance on the rice burners keeps me busy enough.

I still love classic Bronco's. But that's a venture that is going to have to wait until I reach a point in my life where I'm hopefully loaded with cash, have a nice shop, and some free time to tinker with them. In other words, not very soon. Actually I could manage my money well enough to afford parts to build them, it's working space, tools, learning new skills, and TIME to build and do all that supporting criteria that make it too much.

Martinjmpr is right on the money. You start with some old rig you'll very likely never have any fun with it, every weekend will be worry and regret over what you should have worked on, what you didn't work on, and the opportunity to go do something you didn't because you were worrying about working on your project and the fact it wasn't ready.

Now if working on stuff is your thing, great, have at it. Just don't go in thinking you'll be cruising the streets in your cool old ride. All work and no play makes you a cranky SOB.

I've been having a lot more fun once I wrapped my head around using my modern 4x4 to travel and explore in. Modifying it to be more capable has been a lot quicker and was a series of afternoon and day projects that were basically bolt on and go. Went from maybe 1 or 2 day trips a year to several multi-day trips a year, preparing to be camping the latter half of this week, and camping again the weekend after that, and I've been on 2 other weekend or longer trips plus 2-3 day trips already this year. I do enjoy working on things, and having projects. But I've found I enjoy going places and seeing things quite a bit more.

It's not vintage, but here is my suggestion, a 3rd gen 4runner. It's a great contender for the best, most reliable, cheap, all around decent SUV for weekend adventures and general running around. They are running about 20 years old, and typically have 150-250k miles on them but still a lot of life left in those engines. If I had not already been so far into my Xterra build I'd modify mine more. I sometimes wish I had thought of them sooner and made one of those my main rig now I have one. I just got it to drive the snot out of for running errands and going to work, and darned if I don't like the thing a lot. I like my Xterra as well, but I think for more rugged adventures off pavement, building up an older and less valuable vehicle would have been a better fit.
 

trd

Observer
I had big ideas of messing with and driving vintage Bronco's. A '66 and a '70. One to learn on and one to do right. Now I have 2 inoperable Broncos and 2 rice burners that I can actually take places.....and just keeping up on maintenance on the rice burners keeps me busy enough.

I still love classic Bronco's. But that's a venture that is going to have to wait until I reach a point in my life where I'm hopefully loaded with cash, have a nice shop, and some free time to tinker with them. In other words, not very soon. Actually I could manage my money well enough to afford parts to build them, it's working space, tools, learning new skills, and TIME to build and do all that supporting criteria that make it too much.

Martinjmpr is right on the money. You start with some old rig you'll very likely never have any fun with it, every weekend will be worry and regret over what you should have worked on, what you didn't work on, and the opportunity to go do something you didn't because you were worrying about working on your project and the fact it wasn't ready.

Now if working on stuff is your thing, great, have at it. Just don't go in thinking you'll be cruising the streets in your cool old ride. All work and no play makes you a cranky SOB.

I've been having a lot more fun once I wrapped my head around using my modern 4x4 to travel and explore in. Modifying it to be more capable has been a lot quicker and was a series of afternoon and day projects that were basically bolt on and go. Went from maybe 1 or 2 day trips a year to several multi-day trips a year, preparing to be camping the latter half of this week, and camping again the weekend after that, and I've been on 2 other weekend or longer trips plus 2-3 day trips already this year. I do enjoy working on things, and having projects. But I've found I enjoy going places and seeing things quite a bit more.

It's not vintage, but here is my suggestion, a 3rd gen 4runner. It's a great contender for the best, most reliable, cheap, all around decent SUV for weekend adventures and general running around. They are running about 20 years old, and typically have 150-250k miles on them but still a lot of life left in those engines. If I had not already been so far into my Xterra build I'd modify mine more. I sometimes wish I had thought of them sooner and made one of those my main rig now I have one. I just got it to drive the snot out of for running errands and going to work, and darned if I don't like the thing a lot. I like my Xterra as well, but I think for more rugged adventures off pavement, building up an older and less valuable vehicle would have been a better fit.
Thanks for the advice.
 

trd

Observer
Although it doesn't have an enclosed cab naturally, where does a 1975 CJ5 fit into this mix? The V6-3spd, is that going to be a pain in the *** at 70mph on the freeway?
 

Martinjmpr

Wiffleball Batter
Although it doesn't have an enclosed cab naturally, where does a 1975 CJ5 fit into this mix? The V6-3spd, is that going to be a pain in the *** at 70mph on the freeway?
Unless it has an OD I don't think any CJ is going to be happy at 70mph. My wife's YJ wasn't happy at that speed and the handling at that speed was sketchy at best.


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Martinjmpr

Wiffleball Batter
Btw I think a mid-70's CJ-5 would have the 258 straight 6 from the AMC lineup, not the older V-6 that they had in the 60's.


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Riley

Observer
Pretty sure Chevypit got this one right on the money. You'll never touch that number, even if at list, starting from scratch, doing it yourself or paying someone to put it together.

I daily a 93 F150 and there is a reason you don't see many around in most places, "service technicians" are not mechanics. If the computer doesn't say which part to switch, many are lost.

So...if you want to learn how to wrench, have a great time and buy a project you'll be proud of when, if, it gets to a usable point. And hey, when Mom's complaining about the ac going out in August, you'll know how to fix it!

If not, find the newest, most capable vehicle you want to afford.
 

oldnslow

Observer
Although it doesn't have an enclosed cab naturally, where does a 1975 CJ5 fit into this mix? The V6-3spd, is that going to be a pain in the *** at 70mph on the freeway?
Not a problem at 70MPH because it likely won't ever get there. Many years ago I bought a well-used and abused 1976 CJ5 with the 258 straight 6 and a 3 speed. It was terrifying to drive at 55. It would have needed a very long and steep hill to hit 70. It didn't climb well because that 1st gear was too tall. I looked at what it would take to make it what I wanted, and bought a new 1999 Jeep TJ. It was cheaper than building the CJ5, and I was on the road the weekend I bought it. I did a whole lotta camping in that thing in the next 18 years (I still drive it) while someone else was at home wrenching on their "vintage" 1976 CJ5.
 
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