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Expeditions 7: Two Years Around the World on all Seven Continents.

toddz69

Explorer
The video for the Antarctica segment of E7 is now online at expeditions7.com:
http://vimeo.com/97401838

More photos here:
http://www.expeditions7.com/segments/antarctica
I enjoyed watching this segment tonight. At the end, it was mentioned that the Landcruiser was driven around on the continent a bit - obviously so it could be said that it was on all seven continents. One comment befuddled me - it said it was driven near the South Pole. Was it flown down to the South Pole and driven a short distance or? I don't think you guys covered all that distance *again* to the South Pole in it?

Todd Z.
 

Scott Brady

Founder
Ushuaia!

Not many make the trip south in winter, as road conditions can be sketchy (or closed) due to snow when crossing the Andes. We were able to thread the needle and had a wonderful trip on our seventh continent. More details soon, once the team gets decompressed a bit and organizes the images. I also have a great story on my best meal on E7, in a little town along the border with Chile.


Ushuaia was not without its challenges and excitement, including a protest blocking the only road out of town.
 

spencyg

This Space For Rent
So admittedly I've been out of the ExPo loop for quite awhile. I happened upon Clay Croft's web series on youtube and he kept talking about this E7 trip in Russia. Clearly I had no idea what he was referring to.

So I found out what E7 is. Holy crap guys. This is such an amazing series of adventures that it will take me quite some time to fully wrap my mind around it. The gear, the people, the logistics, the video and stills...not to mention the places!

Scott Brady officially has, by far, the very best job in the entire world. Bar none, hands down, no contest.

Thank you all for sharing these adventures with the EP community. As I read through these pages I can't help but think to myself "After they finish this, what will there be left to do???". Of course, the world is a big place so that is clearly a silly question...

But really....where to next?

SG
 

Ozarker

Explorer
I've found its worthwhile changing into dry thermals for sleeping in. Anything I've been wearing during the day will have accumulated some dampness which isn't noticeable but definitely chills down at night.
Fantastic thread Scott! Right Grahamfitter. I'm only to #704 and had to post. This is acceptable and should be comfortable with a proper bag. Moisture on clothing is the enemy in extreme cold. Per my Army training playing in the snow 8+ feet deep in -52 degree weather with the 10th Mountain Division. Bad idea to wear all your day clothes to bed, you can freeze from the damp clothing even with a coat/parka, the next day, that could be 28-30 hours in the same clothes the next morning and they will be damp even if you don't feel it the night before. Temp and humidity both play a role. It also depends on how much you sweat in your bag too, if you're too warm and forcing yourself (psychologically) to stay covered up, you'll sweat. Clean and dry thermal cotton long johns are good to hit the sack in, if you wake up damp, change in you bag, then get dressed. Keeping clothes in the bag but not against your body, don't breath on them, that keeps clothes warm enough. How can you tell? Sit up in your bag and expose your upper body, if you start chilling on you back, chest and arms in a few seconds, you're damp.

I know clothes have changed since I charged up hills but the principles are still valid. Wool is still my friend. I think the Army winter survival manual for Artic conditions, FM something, is available and unclassified, not sure now, but you can check through Govt. Publications. :)

Edited, finished now, an all day read LOL. Fantastic doesn't describe this adventure, lucky you! Ought to make a movie! Hope you got enough tape.

Good question......what's next, you're too young to stop after this one? ;)
 
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grimbo

Explorer
Would love to see some footage/coverage of everyday life in the vehicles. It always seems to be a battle to keep the chaos in order when travelling. Not so much the rear drawer systems but how do you manage to store all the stuff like cameras, food etc while driving
 

cruiseroutfit

Supporting Sponsor: Cruiser Outfitters
Would love to see some footage/coverage of everyday life in the vehicles. It always seems to be a battle to keep the chaos in order when travelling. Not so much the rear drawer systems but how do you manage to store all the stuff like cameras, food etc while driving
It can be a bit chaotic but each vehicle has it's own neat storage solutions that really shine in different ways. I'll make a point of snapping some pics of the different setups when I'm back with the rigs next. I do have a fair amount of pictures and detail on Sherpa I & II as I've spent a fair bit of time in them. The Sherpa rigs were born out of Greg and Scott's realization that the trip was growing. While it was initially going to be 2 trucks and 4-6 bodies, it's been as many as 13 people on an individual leg, obviously not workable with just 2 or even 3 rigs. Add the additional gear (particularly food and water), fuel needs for the Canning Stock Route and Namib Desert crossing and of course personal gear and you can see how the Sherpa gets its name. Its primary function in many aspects is hauling the camera gear. I've had the opportunity to spend time with 3 different cameramen along the journey and each has their own way of storing and accessing gear though in most cases the bigger gear goes in the canopy (slider, tripods, etc) and the smaller stuff (pelican cases, actual cameras, lenses, etc) goes in the back seat. Hope that answer is a start to your question?

Here are a few pics of the Sherpa II in action in a few various trims, full to empty (Australia)

IMG_6976 (Small).JPG

20130323_130722 (Small).jpg

IMG_0840 (Small).JPG

And just because the Sherpa is such a good looking machine, I had to add this one:

IMG_0538 (Small).JPG
(Sunset on the Atacama Desert, Chile)
 

grimbo

Explorer
Thanks for those details and for the future updates

So what happens to the cruisers after it's all said and done?
 

cruiseroutfit

Supporting Sponsor: Cruiser Outfitters
Thanks for those details and for the future updates

So what happens to the cruisers after it's all said and done?
Following the completion of the expedition, they will be on display at the Land Cruiser Heritage Museum in Tooele, Utah. The museum is already well worth the trip if your a Cruiserhead however with the Expeditions7 vehicles in the collection, it shall not be missed. :cool:
 
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