Expedition Vehicle selection thoughts?

Mundo4x4Casa

West slope, N. Ser. Nev.
srq,
It looks like you are settled in with the Cummins/5500. One issue that I've been mulling over with this thread is frame flexibility as regards to using a 3 or 4 point subframe so as not to pull the camper body apart.
Has Ford changed their frame rigidity in the last 15 years?
When I was working through what truck platform to get for my Lance, I found that Ford had the most flexibility compared to Dodge or Chevy. What I found was the hydro formed frame Dodge used on their 2001-2002, 3 to 5 series trucks was the least flexible and thus not requiring a separate 3-point subframe. Chevy is very close if not the same according to Jack. Flex is exacerbated with a long wheel base, so I bought a short bed truck knowing it would be more difficult to find a suitable camper box but easier on tight turns in the wild. My bro has a long bed, 1999 Ford 7.3/6 speed/9.5 OUTFITTER! and he has to double or triple pump the same turns I do in one pop. Those pesky front leaf springs are part of the problem as is the longer w.b.
jefe
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
Chassis cab Fords are boxed front, C channel rear frame. The F250/350 fully boxed frame is too rigid for the big trucks, and a pita to mount boxes to. People wanted stffer frames, Ford provided. I don't agree with it, but the ride is nicer.

Ever see a flat bed truck split it's frame in half on a lift? Thats often because they bolted the flat bed down too well and eliminated frame flex. So the frame only flexes between the cab and bed. Splits like a sheet of folded paper eventually.

Spring mounting campers kinda stinks, but works.
 
We chose the Ram 5500 over the F550 for several reasons. I think the 6.7 cummins is a better motor. I am not a fan of the 6.7 Powerstroke at all, however, I love the 7.3 Powerstroke and if Ford brought that motor back then the chassis choice would be simple. I have a 2003 F250 with the 7.3 motor and absolutely love it. Additionally, Ford requires the body to be lifted of the chassis for some repairs and that would mean removal and disassembly of the cabin and thus is not acceptable. Lastly, if we decide to travel south of the border deleting the DEF is easier on the Dodge then the Ford.

Good answer . Just not to the question I asked.. I am asking about you choice to switch from the MTV platform to a pickup truck platform.. what aspect of your experience with the MTV prompted this decision to switch platforms? What are the driving (no pun intended) factors?
 
Hi Greg - when you had the KW converted to 4x4, did they replace the front axle with something a bit more off-road-worthy? From what I can see, it comes stock with one of those upside-down axles that would really kill your clearance. Thanks - Jason
Standard front drive axle with clearance at the differential similar to the rear axle. Two speed transfer case. Goodyear G278 tires in the 425 size but you can go a size larger with the G278.
 
Good answer . Just not to the question I asked.. I am asking about you choice to switch from the MTV platform to a pickup truck platform.. what aspect of your experience with the MTV prompted this decision to switch platforms? What are the driving (no pun intended) factors?
We fell in love with Alaska and plan on spending 6 to 8 month a year here the rest of the time we are going to be traveling in Canada and the lower 48. So we needed a vehicle built around two seasons worth of gear vs four and that gets better fuel milage and is more fun to drive between the lower 48 and Alaska .
 
My wife and I lived full time through a Rocky Mountain winter wild camping/boon docking every night in our truck. We also explored the High Sierras, Death Valley and plenty of southern Utah - including running the White Rim Trail as the first vehicle through after November snows.

The requirements:
25 feet or less in length
19ft
1. Really good off-road 4x4 not even close to stuck even once, rear and front locking differentials we don't have them but I believe you can fit ARB lockers, winch we have a Warn 12,000lb, decent approach/departure/breakover angles check, 3 point camper mount ours has a four point flex mount but does a similar job
2. Have or be able to be modded for large solar+lithium battery bank. Electricity the main power source. This is an option, as is an induction hob.
3. Bellow/portal access from cab to camper. Certainly possible but would require a custom build
4. Large freshwater/grey tanks, cassette or composting toilet, large diesel fuel tank(s). 80gal fresh (+ remote collection & filtering), 23 gal grey, fresh water Thetford cassette toilet. Space and payload for an aux fuel tank if required we didn't need one.
5. Must be 0F to 110F capable. Check. We saw -10 to 10f for weeks on end in Utah in Jan/Feb. Inch thick fibreglass/foam sandwich built in a female mould Double pane windows, Yes interior or heated tanks and lines Dedicated heat for water tanks. Air conditioning and heater systems that are commensurate with these temps. We have a Webasto DualTop which ran solidly for 3 months and was superb. No A/C but if you really wanted it you could fit it. We found the setting the fans to blow out worked well with vents opened in the right spots.
6. Parts have to still be available. Available in every town across N America
7. A vehicle cab that you don't have to put ear plugs in at 65 MPH and doesn't beat you to death. We cruise at 65 and do just fine
8. If foreign, must be left hand drive and registerable in the US. US Truck

Cost is $121k plus the truck

You'll notice that the first picture depicts a route that you couldn't drive in virtually all the vehicles discussed, and must be one of the finest trails in the whole world. Personally I wouldn't dismiss a popup hard sided camper: I was a buyer/owner before I set up XPCamper in Europe. Ours is the original Prototype 1.1 on a single cab 2007 6.0 F350 with 35" Toyo MTs we get 19mpg (US). We have 480w of solar and 420Ah AGM batteries, lithium is an option. After nearly 10 years in production the V1 is a really refined build now. There is loads of storage, and we managed with all our ski kit, despite having the only single cab in the fleet and no under tray boxes. If you ever did want to explore further afield it will fit in a 20ft shipping container. If you ever have an issue with the truck you swap the bed and camper onto a different vehicle - unlike a coach built camper.

Everyone has their own best set of compromises but having read the whole thread I'm not sure why you ruled out the very first suggestion. Best of luck with your search, happy to answer questions with my owners hat on, or my XPCamper hat on!

Hardscrabble Hill - White Rim Trail.jpg

White Crack at Sunset 3.jpg 1490581_800111873350405_7877586198346552644_o.jpg joeandjosees baja img_20501.jpg Toward-Bed-940x463.jpg
 
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My wife and I lived full time through a Rocky Mountain winter wild camping/boon docking every night in our truck. We also explored the High Sierras, Death Valley and plenty of southern Utah - including running the White Rim Trail as the first vehicle through after November snows.

The requirements:
25 feet or less in length
19ft
1. Really good off-road 4x4 not even close to stuck even once, rear and front locking differentials we don't have them but I believe you can fit ARB lockers, winch we have a Warn 12,000lb, decent approach/departure/breakover angles check, 3 point camper mount ours has a four point flex mount but does a similar job
2. Have or be able to be modded for large solar+lithium battery bank. Electricity the main power source. This is an option, as is an induction hob.
3. Bellow/portal access from cab to camper. Certainly possible but would require a custom build
4. Large freshwater/grey tanks, cassette or composting toilet, large diesel fuel tank(s). 80gal fresh (+ remote collection & filtering), 23 gal grey, fresh water Thetford cassette toilet. Space and payload for an aux fuel tank if required we didn't need one.
5. Must be 0F to 110F capable. Check. We saw -10 to 10f for weeks on end in Utah in Jan/Feb. Inch thick fibreglass/foam sandwich built in a female mould Double pane windows, Yes interior or heated tanks and lines Dedicated heat for water tanks. Air conditioning and heater systems that are commensurate with these temps. We have a Webasto DualTop which ran solidly for 3 months and was superb. No A/C but if you really wanted it you could fit it. We found the setting the fans to blow out worked well with vents opened in the right spots.
6. Parts have to still be available. Available in every town across N America
7. A vehicle cab that you don't have to put ear plugs in at 65 MPH and doesn't beat you to death. We cruise at 65 and do just fine
8. If foreign, must be left hand drive and registerable in the US. US Truck

Cost is $121k plus the truck

You'll notice that the first picture depicts a route that you couldn't drive in virtually all the vehicles discussed, and must be one of the finest trails in the whole world. Personally I wouldn't dismiss a popup hard sided camper: I was a buyer/owner before I set up XPCamper in Europe. Ours is the original Prototype 1.1 on a single cab 2007 6.0 F350 with 35" Toyo MTs we get 19mpg (US). We have 480w of solar and 420Ah AGM batteries, lithium is an option. After nearly 10 years in production the V1 is a really refined build now. There is loads of storage, and we managed with all our ski kit, despite having the only single cab in the fleet and no under tray boxes. If you ever did want to explore further afield it will fit in a 20ft shipping container. If you ever have an issue with the truck you swap the bed and camper onto a different vehicle - unlike a coach built camper.

Everyone has their own best set of compromises but having read the whole thread I'm not sure why you ruled out the very first suggestion. Best of luck with your search, happy to answer questions with my owners hat on, or my XPCamper hat on!

View attachment 482745

View attachment 482746 View attachment 482747 View attachment 482748 View attachment 482749


Is the top picture along the river on the White Rim Trail? Beautiful photos!
 
Is the top picture along the river on the White Rim Trail? Beautiful photos!
Yes it is. The photo with the top popped is White Crack Campground. The camper overhang is actually really practical; it keeps the sun off the cab in hot weather and mostly stops snow from falling on the windscreen in winter. You also end up with a short, light, wieldy and powerful truck that doesn't really notice the weight of the camper unless you have the 80gal water tank full. A custom passthrough could be an option.

Thanks 'Fugly'

Thelma & Louise Point.jpg
 
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The new Chevy HD or International CV is now available.
-22,500lb GVWR in 4x4
-50k psi frame
-6.6L Duramax(after market DEF delete available!!)
-Allison trans(3 options available)
-Dual alternators available
-65gal fuel(25gal/40gal split)

It's a conventional truck which is a downside to me, but it's a real contender!
 
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