Democratic Republic of Congo: Lubumbashi to Kinshasa

Dr.Deol

New member
hii..
It requires a lot of guts to do what you did. four day back, i read first few pages of your thread.. then i got addicted to your thread.. i cant explane my feelings after reading this trip report.. thank you for sharing it..
 

RadioBaobab

Adventurer
I really enjoyed reading your story and besides the source material you really have a way with words. If you ever want to give the Empty Quarter a try let me know and it would be an honour to take you out dune bashing.

In fact if you get anywhere near to Gulf let me know and I will go to you guys and bring the cold ones.
I might take you up on that offer one day. I am an avid fan of the desert.

I know you haven’t posted in some time but if you come back I do have a question.

On page 82 when you show the evolution of your vehicle and is that an Azalai you have on the back of your Series 70?

I ask because I am getting pretty close to giving up (within a couple years) the working life and doing my own around the world trip (my Gunther Holtorf impression).

Finances is not really an issue in my life so I am thinking of going with a new Land Cruiser dual cab GXL and an Azalai Lababouch camper so was just looking for a quick opinion on that combo if you have one but don’t waste any time replying if it cuts into time spent posting the story of you and Josephine on your next adventure.
We have an Azalai now. Not the lababouch, but the dedicated one. I love it, provides a huge amount of comfort in a small package. For me this is about as big as I want my vehicle to be (for now, maybe one day you'll see mee driving in a huge truck... or on a bicycle..). I cannot really fault it up until now. Only problem for me is the legroom in the bed area, but this is specific to my model (they made changes in later models). I am planning to make some changes in the way the bed is organised to fix that.

Great prospect you have. Enjoy every minute of it!

(sorry for the off topic in my own thread :-o )
 

Septu

Explorer
What you have done is unique, crazy, adventurous, insane and beautiful at the same time. It takes a lot of guts. All the time I was there I tried to find out about people who may have done that route or any other but as far as i know you are the only one who has done it.
I first read this report/story a couple years ago. But this pretty much sums it up. I like to consider myself adventurous - to the point where I've done some pretty stupid things. I don't think I'd have the guts to attempt this. So I really want to thank you for taking the time to write this down.

Edit. Glad to see the new setup has a winch.
 
Last edited:

Rbertalotto

Explorer
FANTASTIC.....a bit nuts! But FANTASTIC...

Another great read if you can find it is "20,000 mile south" by Helen and Frank Schreider...Alaska to Tierra Del Fuego....in an Army Surplus WWII amphibious jeep in the 1950s!

AMAZING!
 

OkinawaWild

New member
Wow. I can't believe I just read through 93 pages over two days. What an adventure. This story took my emotions all over he place. I must admit that as I got into the story, I started to become a little miffed at what I thought (wrongly) was a poor attitude from the typical western tourist in a third world country. As I read on and on, that perception changed, and then the wrap up sealed it for me.

I would think "Why not just pay the cops and grease the wheels? That's the way it's done and who are you to change it?" But the way it's written really got me thinking as to what would actually be the proper thing to do. Paying bribes can open a whole new can of problems. Is this really the way it's done, and a part of the "culture", or is it just plain corruption, and a part of the problem? If you start down that road, maybe you're just contributing to the problem...and so on.

I think they did a fantastic job all around.

I especially liked that I would come up with questions, and then those questions would be answered a few posts or pages later. Things like the winch. At first I thought "That's pretty stupid to not have a winch..." But after it was clarified as to why, it actually made perfect sense to me. Not only for the money/time reason, but the fact that deep down, I know first hand how much trouble having a winch can get you in. I was just blind to this, and the OP's answer made me stop and think about it.


Really made me stop and think, and really changed the way I look at a lot of things.

Thank you so much for doing this report. Not just an exceptional report, but a very thought-provoking piece. Bravo.
 

ersatzknarf

lost, but making time
Please share some photos of your Azalai, here or elsewhere... Thanks ! ! ! :D


We have an Azalai now. Not the lababouch, but the dedicated one. I love it, provides a huge amount of comfort in a small package. For me this is about as big as I want my vehicle to be (for now, maybe one day you'll see mee driving in a huge truck... or on a bicycle..). I cannot really fault it up until now. Only problem for me is the legroom in the bed area, but this is specific to my model (they made changes in later models). I am planning to make some changes in the way the bed is organised to fix that.
 

Smooker

New member
Hi RadioBaobab,

I might take you up on that offer one day. I am an avid fan of the desert.
The offer is still open but you should get out to the Gulf as soon as possible because the UAE is spending 10 billion dollars developing the Shah Gas Fields south of the cresent road of Liwa Oasis so see the Empty Quarter now before it turns into a giant industrial plant.

We have an Azalai now. Not the lababouch, but the dedicated one. I love it, provides a huge amount of comfort in a small package. For me this is about as big as I want my vehicle to be (for now, maybe one day you'll see mee driving in a huge truck... or on a bicycle..). I cannot really fault it up until now. Only problem for me is the legroom in the bed area, but this is specific to my model (they made changes in later models). I am planning to make some changes in the way the bed is organised to fix that.
Thanks a lot for the information. I am also thinking less of the Lababouch and more of the Sherazee model because I want to be able to move from driving seat to living space without going outside for security reasons etc.

I have been looking at some different options and I like the American luxury campers like Tiger & EarthRoamer but the American designs are too big and heavy for my style of third world travel. They are great for North America & Canadian etc wide open roads and infrastructure but if you are crossing bridges in the third world the smaller and lighter European designs look like a better choice.

Maybe the Answer is an Earth Roamer for the New World and an Azalai for the Old World?

Anyway thanks for the answers and all the best for future trips.

Cheers , Smooker
 

Recommended books for Overlanding

Long Way Round: Chasing Shadows Across the World
by Ewan McGregor, Charley Boorman
From $14.59
Sailing Alone Around the World: a Personal Account of the...
by Joshua Slocum
From $26
Crossing the Congo: Over Land and Water in a Hard Place
by Mike Martin, Chloe Baker, Charlie Hatch-Barnwell
From $29.19

Zoehoe

New member
Another freshly signed up member, just to comment on this thread.

I somehow stumbled upon this thread (I have zero interest in cars, so I would have otherwise never found this), and I am in awe!

Jeetje F&J, wat een verháál! Ik ben het helemaal met de anderen eens; schrijf een boek! Niet een 'overland travel guidebook', gewoon, júllie verhaal, júllie reis (of delen ervan), júllie herinneringen. Ik hoop oprecht dat jullie dat in overweging nemen/hebben genomen, want niet alleen de reis, maar ook jullie schrijfstijl én 'way of thinking' zijn bijzonder. Ik reis veel, vaak en ver met m'n vriend, maar van zoiets als dit heb ik zelfs nog nooit gedroomd. En vanaf nu ga ik dat zeker doen!

Mochten jullie een keer in de Nederlandse hoofdstad zijn en 'ne pint willen pakken, let me know. Ik wil jullie verhalen maar al te graag live horen!
 

GFO

Observer
RadioBaobab,


Amazing thread/read. Would you mind posting a few pics of the 75 and how it is currenty?

Thanks,
 

grogie

Like to Camp
Wonderful story. Scary, intense, and what I've thought about for the last two days! I had to keep telling myself that because I was able to read this, it meant that you had survived! I'm so glad you and your lady made it home safely and thank you for sharing your story, including all of the grit.

I tell you what, I am thankful I was born where I was and for the ease of life that I have (minus the long hours at work... but so thankful to the Lord for it!). It's a fallen world out there that is for sure.

Thanks again. :ylsmoke:
 
Top