Colorado / Canyon bent frame

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
Chet, the pics you posted are apples and oranges. Those two trucks are different generations and of course those frames are going to look different. I've never seen a frame under a cab only fleet vehicle that differed from its equal duty pickup bed equipped version.

Ford has used a different frame and rear springs on chassis cab trucks since at least 2017. IIRC, Dodge as well.

Modern boxed frames suck for 350 and heavier service trucks, with service bodies or flatbeds.
 

Buddha.

Lurker
Maybe since truck manufacturers are leaning toward off road specific models they also need to list capacities for both on road and off road. IIRC U.S. military lists their specs for off road, payload and tow capacity.
 
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billiebob

My Uncle drove a government issued Jeep in Europe
Chet, the pics you posted are apples and oranges. Those two trucks are different generations and of course those frames are going to look different. I've never seen a frame under a cab only fleet vehicle that differed from its equal duty pickup bed equipped version.
actually, dual cab & chassis is completely different from Dually pickup. Has been since Chevy introduced the "Dually Pickup" in 1973? The big difference, Dual C&C, the frame rails are parrellel. Dually pickup the frame rails flare out giving a wider track. Same as the non dually pickup.
 

billiebob

My Uncle drove a government issued Jeep in Europe
Check out about 2.17 about the differences in the frame.
Excellant video !!

I have never liked the wide track dully pickup.
I've always preferred the narrow track cab & chassis format.
But I've never noticed the rear spring differences, I assumed I could get a variety of capacities on a C&C.
 
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rho

Lost again
Unlikely a manufacturer will do it. That would open a door to major headache land.
With off chance they did, Azzcovering would be in order. They would publish offroad ‘specs at crazy low values which would only turn off sales.
People already complain a lot about offroad specific models having less towing/payload rating, so I wouldn't be surprised to see that happen.
 

Lucky j

Explorer
That reminds me when the first ford Raptor came out, and frames where bending when people would jump tyem like prerunners.
 
New Colorados are the same size as my 06 Silverado, just 1' taller.
Riiiiiight.

2006 Silverado 1500 4x4 Crew Cab SB
  • FRONT HEAD ROOM:40.7 "
  • FRONT LEG ROOM:41.3 "
  • OVERALL HEIGHT:75.0 "
  • OVERALL LENGTH:230.2 "
  • OVERALL WIDTH:78.5 "
  • REAR HEAD ROOM:40.2 "
  • REAR LEG ROOM:39.1 "
  • WHEELBASE:143.5 "
2019 Colorado Z71 4x4 Crew Cab SB
  • FRONT HEAD ROOM:41.4 "
  • FRONT LEG ROOM:45.0 "
  • OVERALL HEIGHT:70.6 "
  • OVERALL LENGTH:212.7 "
  • OVERALL WIDTH:74.3 "
  • REAR HEAD ROOM:38.3 "
  • REAR LEG ROOM:35.8 "
  • WHEELBASE:128.3 "
 

cowboy4x4

Explorer
This guy isn't being truthful. .. he was hauling arse down a road and hit a big whoop the pics that first hit the web failed to show the damage on his trailer, he bent the axle on his trailer he hit the whoop so hard. Just trying to get money for his own screw up.524774
 

shade

Well-known member
This guy isn't being truthful. .. he was hauling arse down a road and hit a big whoop the pics that first hit the web failed to show the damage on his trailer, he bent the axle on his trailer he hit the whoop so hard. Just trying to get money for his own screw up.View attachment 524774
Good point about trailer damage. I haven't seen any definitive photos of damage to it, but they would be telling.
 

vtsoundman

OverAnalyzer
There is another photo that shows a long draw bar or extension. I did some math in another thread and it increased the torque on that hitch damn near 50%...

Using a normal bar and 375# of ball weight, he should of had something around 300lbft on that hitch assembly. I guesstimated an 18" extension...it was close to 600lb ft of torque on that hitch assembly (more than 500# / 420lb-ft with a normal bar).

I feel for the guy, but that tongue was too long and I'll bet that tongue was far more than 375# when it happened (especially since it was weight at the dealer).

We can see 2 jerry cans (80#), a rotopax (40#) a propane bottle (30#), a metal box (40#) and I likely one or two batteries in that tongue box (100#)...plus whatever is in that trailer. Some of that weight is divided between trailer and tongue, but I'll bet he was close to 500# of ball weight.

That may be a weak point in the frame, but he was too fast and to heavy for the conditions. Let's not forget chevy reduced the towing capacity by almost 2000# for the ZR2 ... Citing offroas (softer) suspension.
 
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vtsoundman

OverAnalyzer
The old trucks had stronger frames than today's trucks? Don't think so...not by a mile. About the only thing better about old trucks it their simplicity - and even then I can't fathom messing around with a carburetor again.

The one ton (3500, f350, etc) from yesteryear can't hold a candle to the trucks of today. 25000# or more is the towing capacity for today's f350 trucks...a half ton of today can easily manage 7000# while hauling a*" up a grade. May not be comfortable, but it wouldn't be a death trap like it would have been for an F150 from the 70s.

Hydroforming, complex bends, etc are far far stronger. Try doing what that guy did in a s10 or ranger - it would be dragging ass.

Have to laugh when people attempt to compare old vehicle strength vs today - old cars fold like pretzels when wrecked. The old truck frames flexed more than the damn suspension. There was so much twist the doors would jam and the tailgates wouldn't open if the suspension was in too much of a twist. The K series Chevies and F series Ford's from the 80s had like 1-2" of front suspension travel before they were into the stops (not bounce bumpers - those are part of the suspension). Depending on what I did during the weekend, the gap between the front clip and my bumper in my 80s suburban would change.

Try hauling 3500# behind a half ton pickup headed up to Tahoe with an early 90s or 80s truck...35mph on a good day. That little Colorado - no problem.
 
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b dkw1

Observer
I saw a Canyon in downtown Dallas that was being used as a delivery truck. It had a lift gate on the back of it. The gap between the bed and the cab looked a little big. Looked like one more good load and it would look like this truck.
 

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