2020 Ram 5500 DIY Composite Panel Camper Build Thread

RAM5500 CAMPERTHING

OG Portal Member #183
Well

The goal was to keep the overall length under 24ft if possible.

Reason being, is somewhat trivial. Some National Parks and campgrounds dont allow vehicles over 24ft (not sure if this is actually ever enforced), and although the chances of being a little bit over actually being an issue are slim, it was a goal to try to hit anyway.

Just did a final overall measurement and its right at 23'9" from front winch hook to rear tow hitch

Woot
 

peculierboy

New member
Well

The goal was to keep the overall length under 24ft if possible.

Reason being, is somewhat trivial. Some National Parks and campgrounds dont allow vehicles over 24ft (not sure if this is actually ever enforced), and although the chances of being a little bit over actually being an issue are slim, it was a goal to try to hit anyway.

Just did a final overall measurement and its right at 23'9" from front winch hook to rear tow hitch

Woot
Same here, we didn't quite make it, we are 24.5 ft. We've heard 25' was the limit in most parks.

And yes, some parks do enforce it. We were at Dead Horse Point a few years back, and the ranger turned an RV away after a hilarious argument (well, to us anyway) by the RV'er. After the ranger station closed down, the guy came back to try to camp and couldn't get in the site after multiple tries. It was entertaining to watch him try, and then storm off.
 

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1000arms

Well-known member
... Reason being, is somewhat trivial. Some National Parks and campgrounds don't allow vehicles over 24ft (not sure if this is actually ever enforced), and although the chances of being a little bit over actually being an issue are slim, it was a goal to try to hit anyway. ...
I don't think it is trivial. Some US National Park Service (NPS) sites have vehicle size "advisories" and/or limits. They may be in campgrounds and/or on the roads. Length, width, and/or height might be specified. Even direction of travel may include limits and/or warnings. I've included a few examples:




I suspect that, with the increasing number of visitors to NPS sites, any restrictions, if not already enforced, will become more likely to become enforced as part of the strategies to "fit" visitors in to the parks.

... And yes, some parks do enforce it. We were at Dead Horse Point a few years back, and the ranger turned an RV away after a hilarious argument (well, to us anyway) by the RV'er. After the ranger station closed down, the guy came back to try to camp and couldn't get in the site after multiple tries. It was entertaining to watch him try, and then storm off.
Dead Horse Point State Park (of Utah) is a good point about state/county/city restrictions as well. ... Yes, pun intended. :cool:
 

Adventurous

Explorer
Well

The goal was to keep the overall length under 24ft if possible.

Reason being, is somewhat trivial. Some National Parks and campgrounds dont allow vehicles over 24ft (not sure if this is actually ever enforced), and although the chances of being a little bit over actually being an issue are slim, it was a goal to try to hit anyway.

Just did a final overall measurement and its right at 23'9" from front winch hook to rear tow hitch

Woot
OAL is a reasonable build requirement. They WILL turn you away at certain parks, roads, and campgrounds if you are oversized. Not to mention, if you ever have to ferry your rig, there are oversize requirements there too, though those probably vary by boat.

Rig is looking good though. Would love to see a write up on the in-cab gauges and inflation setup. I'm after something similar.
 

RAM5500 CAMPERTHING

OG Portal Member #183
Same here, we didn't quite make it, we are 24.5 ft. We've heard 25' was the limit in most parks.

And yes, some parks do enforce it. We were at Dead Horse Point a few years back, and the ranger turned an RV away after a hilarious argument (well, to us anyway) by the RV'er. After the ranger station closed down, the guy came back to try to camp and couldn't get in the site after multiple tries. It was entertaining to watch him try, and then storm off.
Good to know! Ive been to Deadhorse several times, and will likely go back! Thanks
 

RAM5500 CAMPERTHING

OG Portal Member #183
I don't think it is trivial. Some US National Park Service (NPS) sites have vehicle size "advisories" and/or limits. They may be in campgrounds and/or on the roads. Length, width, and/or height might be specified. Even direction of travel may include limits and/or warnings. I've included a few examples:




I suspect that, with the increasing number of visitors to NPS sites, any restrictions, if not already enforced, will become more likely to become enforced as part of the strategies to "fit" visitors in to the parks.


Dead Horse Point State Park (of Utah) is a good point about state/county/city restrictions as well. ... Yes, pun intended. :cool:
That is great info! Thanks!

I tried doing a lot of research on this, and found very limited specifics!

Thanks
 

RAM5500 CAMPERTHING

OG Portal Member #183
OAL is a reasonable build requirement. They WILL turn you away at certain parks, roads, and campgrounds if you are oversized. Not to mention, if you ever have to ferry your rig, there are oversize requirements there too, though those probably vary by boat.

Rig is looking good though. Would love to see a write up on the in-cab gauges and inflation setup. I'm after something similar.
Thanks! Yeah, the ferries i looked into all throughout BC seemed to have a 24ft length and 12ft height limit before the extreme fees starting adding up.
 

peculierboy

New member
How/where the gauges/switches are mounted, etc.. Thanks
Mounted left of the column. I have an 18, and I think your dash/console is different. There was no perfect place to mount it. The Plus, it's out of the way and I can't whack my knee on it getting in/out. The Minus, can't see it while driving. Didn't want it in my console or above the dash, so here we are. Considered a pillar mount, but running the air lines to that location quickly made me dismiss that option.


IMG_20200621_153516366_HDR (Medium).jpg
 

1000arms

Well-known member
I don't think it is trivial. Some US National Park Service (NPS) sites have vehicle size "advisories" and/or limits. They may be in campgrounds and/or on the roads. Length, width, and/or height might be specified. Even direction of travel may include limits and/or warnings. I've included a few examples:




I suspect that, with the increasing number of visitors to NPS sites, any restrictions, if not already enforced, will become more likely to become enforced as part of the strategies to "fit" visitors in to the parks.


Dead Horse Point State Park (of Utah) is a good point about state/county/city restrictions as well. ... Yes, pun intended. :cool:
That is great info! Thanks!

I tried doing a lot of research on this, and found very limited specifics!

Thanks
You are very welcome!

There are "only" 62 US National Parks, but the there are many other NP sites, which people often mistakenly call parks, for a total of (currently) 419 units. See the following link for a list of the different types of NPS sites with links to the appropriate individual sites.


When using the website for a NPS site, look for "Plan your visit", then "Directions and Transportation", and then "the obvious" or "need to dig for it, because it ain't obvious". See the Glacier NP website, as a (unfortunately) bad example. Then look at "Eating and Sleeping", and then "Camping". Nope, it ain't all in one place. :cool:

Unfortunately, there isn't, to the best of my knowledge, a National Park Service vehicle-size-limit table for all 419 NPS sites. So, you will need to research each NPS site. I suggest using the NPS.gov website. Too often, non-NPS websites don't include all the information needed for exploring NPS sites. I also suggest checking the appropriate website regarding any other US federal agency.




Here is another example of a vehicle restrictions in a US National Park:

 
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1000arms

Well-known member
We live about a mile from the main entrance to Acadia. You wouldn't believe the things we've seen and what they have tried to do here. Sadly I can't drive my own rig in Acadia.
Well, I might, but only because I am aware of the foolishness/silliness /stupidity/... that I know of from other National Parks.

In 2008 the NPS put out an internal memo which included information regarding the doubling of visitors to the Forks WA NPS visitor information center, having gone from about 8000 in 2006 to about 16000 in 2007. The memo also mentioned that the NPS Rangers were often asked, "How's the camping, with all the vampires in the area?" Evidently the number of visitors/year continued to climb for a couple more years. For a bit more of an explanation, see:


You just need to convince @MTVR to lead the way and knock a few obstacles out of the way, then your vehicle will fit! :unsure: ... :cool:

Besides, that sort of action would likely fit right in. :(
 

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MTVR

Well-known member
In 2008 the NPS put out an internal memo which included information regarding the doubling of visitors to the Forks WA NPS visitor information center, having gone from about 8000 in 2006 to about 16000 in 2007. The memo also mentioned that the NPS Rangers were often asked, "How's the camping, with all the vampires in the area?" Evidently the number of visitors/year continued to climb for a couple more years. For a bit more of an explanation, see:

 
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