2020 Ford Transit AWD

Grassland

Well-known member
In regards to the 3.5 NA cyclone motor, it's essentially the same motor as the 3.7 cyclone, which I have in my 2018 Transit 250 MR LWB. I have 3.73 gears.
It's derated compared to my F150, and as it isn't tuned it suffers from the throttle lag and lazy shifting from Ford.
It is a high revving engine design. I haul around a couple thousand lbs of stuff every day and it is adequate. I'd recommend 4.10s if you are planning to put larger tires on it. The 10 speed will help as well.
It's a trade off. More reliability but far less power than EcoBoost.
As a comparison I find the 3.7 and 6R80 combo slightly better on fuel and better acceleration than the 2011 4.6 2V and 4 speed E250 I drove before I was self employed. I have more room and better ergonomics.
I manage 14 us mpg or 16.5 l/100 so far in mostly city driving.
The next fleet van will be either an AWD 3.5 NA van or a RWD 3.5 NA van
I have not towed much or far, but from that little experience I don't want to tow with the giant sailboat of a van. The trailer was only 2100# but a strong cross wind made the payment experience not enjoyable.
 
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dman93

Adventurer
Two days into our second high Sierra camping trip with our new AWD T250 with EcoBoost. This motor with 10 speed and 3.73 gears is so good that I suspect the 3.5 non-turbo is still OK. Of course my other truck is a 3rd gen V6 Tacoma with AT so my standards aren’t very high. Seriously though, the tractability, low end and fairly smooth shifts just make the powertrain something one forgets about, but then you get pleasurably reminded when you tip into the throttle.

I’m currently sitting at a camp spot 8500’ above sea level. Alternated between using Tow/Haul mode and Mud/Ruts which holds it in 1st gear, for about a mile of crawling off the highway to get here. It’s long and wide, mirrors are too wide, traction on dust and rocks with OEM Conti’s at factory pressure was just fine. ground clearance to vulnerable bits is low so I took it easy. Felt no need for low range. Would of course have been a piece of cake in my DCSB Taco but the sleeping accommodations, having all gear and two bikes inside out of the weather, and swivel seats to hang out inside after sunset are a fine trade off.
 

Christian P.

Expedition Leader
Staff member
Well we did go and test drive this van yesterday:


1603060072058.png

We did not buy it, for various reasons.

The good:

The color was phenomenal. So much nicer than a white one in our opinion.
The sales-guy was awesome (Nick). He was super chill and no pressure whatsoever.
The driving position is nice, it feels a lot more like a car than say the Ram Promaster.
Brake/Handling was great.
Fairly quiet for a van.
Acceleration/Power was totally acceptable (this was not the Eco-Boost). More on that below.

The bad:

We need more windows. I was okay with adding some aftermarket windows (such as Tern Overland) but we think we would prefer to have the factory ones, at least in the back.
We think we may want the extended version. We got a quote for the extended (see following post) and it ends up pretty high - about $54000 (with discount but before negotiation). That seems like a lot of money for an empty van.

But the main reason we walked away from that specific one was the transmission. The way it shifted did not feel right. At low speed, from a stop, it seems like it was a bit jerky and wanting to shift too fast. It is hard to explain, but it did not inspire confidence. I tried the manual mode, and they it "jerked" when downshifting to a red light.

Maybe it was that specific van, or maybe it's just the way it is designed.

Also, while the power seems indeed acceptable, I felt like the engine/tranny combo was getting very noisy when pushed harder. I am fully expecting this vehicle to be different than our BMW, but still it wasn't as smooth as I had hoped for $50k 2020 vehicle.

I am going to go try another one later and see how I feel about it again. But for now we are back to the drawing board.
 

rruff

Explorer
We think we may want the extended version. We got a quote for the extended (see following post) and it ends up pretty high - about $54000 (with discount but before negotiation). That seems like a lot of money for an empty van.

But the main reason we walked away from that specific one was the transmission. The way it shifted did not feel right. At low speed, from a stop, it seems like it was a bit jerky and wanting to shift too fast. It is hard to explain, but it did not inspire confidence. I tried the manual mode, and they it "jerked" when downshifting to a red light.
I priced one not long ago, and the cutaway with a custom box looked like the way to go; similar to what Victorian did. Saves ~$10k on van, and you can get a longer wheelbase too.

$36,600 with 156" wheelbase.

Don't know for sure if this is what you expereinced with the transmission, but they are typically programmed for MPGs, and they "learn" how to function for each driver... takes a awhile. You may be able to buy an aftermarket device that lets you modify how it works.
 

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Highlander

The Good Shepherd
Yesterday I went check out Transits vans in Hudson Valley, NY.
I was mostly interested in cargo vans, but this is the reason I changed my mind;
We need more windows. I was okay with adding some aftermarket windows (such as Tern Overland) but we think we would prefer to have the factory ones, at least in the back.
I felt I was in a small cell with now windows apart Form windshield. Didn’t like how it felt inside.
However, on the lot there was a rw crew wan, long/mid roof. It was a huge difference between these two.
The crew van has got extra side windows, factory removable 2nd row seats, and airbags for the crew wich is a good safety feature and rear door windows with defrosters. I am tall and the rear seats fell quite good. It can be removed vary easily.
One thing I did not like was that the crew platform is a 2 inches higher than the loading area behind.

Generally, I liked the crew van way way more and It’s very likely I’ll go with that.

Also, I learned the cargo awd vans are relatively easy to find, there were handful on the lot, but the crew awd vans are not so much easy to find. According to the dealer he only had Transits with an LSD a few times and they sell a lot of Transits. So If I were to buy a new Transit I would order one to make sure I get features like LSD, dual batteries, towing option, factory outlets, etc.
 

T town

New member
In the cargo van you can get just two rear windows or those plus a slider Or windows all around just like a passenger van. You’d have to order a new one that way as I’m sure they are rare.
 

T town

New member
They sprung for leather but did a complete radio delete? Man, people are weird. I don't think it would cost anything extra to just get the basic sound system and then at least there are speakers in the holes. With a delete I'm sure there is nothing.....but more work.
It has vinyl seats.
 

Christian P.

Expedition Leader
Staff member
Yesterday I went check out Transits vans in Hudson Valley, NY.
I was mostly interested in cargo vans, but this is the reason I changed my mind;

I felt I was in a small cell with now windows apart Form windshield. Didn’t like how it felt inside.
However, on the lot there was a rw crew wan, long/mid roof. It was a huge difference between these two.
The crew van has got extra side windows, factory removable 2nd row seats, and airbags for the crew wich is a good safety feature and rear door windows with defrosters. I am tall and the rear seats fell quite good. It can be removed vary easily.
One thing I did not like was that the crew platform is a 2 inches higher than the loading area behind.

Generally, I liked the crew van way way more and It’s very likely I’ll go with that.

Also, I learned the cargo awd vans are relatively easy to find, there were handful on the lot, but the crew awd vans are not so much easy to find. According to the dealer he only had Transits with an LSD a few times and they sell a lot of Transits. So If I were to buy a new Transit I would order one to make sure I get features like LSD, dual batteries, towing option, factory outlets, etc.
That's also exactly how we felt (about the lack of windows). Good info about the Crew Van.

There are tons of AWD for sale across the USA if you are not looking for specific options. But yes if you want (which we all do...) dual batteries, swivel seats, eco-boost, dual alternator, tow package, not white, etc - then it is impossible to find. You need to special order it and it may take months and months.

So one crazy option we are considering is just to "settled" on a base mid-roof 148" AWD for now, hoping for an end-of-year special on the 2020 somewhere to stay below $40k. Enjoy it as-is with just some small and reconfigurable modifications. And in parallel, put an order for one with all the right options which would probably come in 9-12 months and would cost close to $60k...

:)
 

86scotty

Explorer
It has vinyl seats.
I haven't run the VIN but I did own a Transit with vinyl and I've been around a bunch of others. That looks much nicer than vinyl. Ford has upped their game or those are leather. Unless this is yours. I'm curious how you are so sure?
 
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