2005 Tundra novice build - "The Rez"

trailscape

Explorer
Anyone actually know how the oem transmission cooler works? It seems it runs as a bypass until the temps hit 180+ and then it actually starts to cool.
I have a B&M cooler installed and just put the oem one back in as well. I'll see temps go over 180 and then quickly drop to about 160.
 

toyotech

Expedition Leader
Anyone actually know how the oem transmission cooler works? It seems it runs as a bypass until the temps hit 180+ and then it actually starts to cool.
I have a B&M cooler installed and just put the oem one back in as well. I'll see temps go over 180 and then quickly drop to about 160.
Not sure on the 05 and up as they use WS fluid. I know the 2nd gen tundra and up has a bypass to the cooler.

I know the 00-04 don’t have any bypasses.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

trailscape

Explorer
That's a question I have been trying to find an answer to with no luck. I have no idea what the normal temperature range is supposed to be....either normal driving or towing.
I always figured anything over 200 was a bad thing myself, but here's what I could dig up. I searched for info on the A750F transmission, not Tundra specific.
What I gather is ideal below 200, but short intervals of 200-230 may be okay. Here's some good links below for further research.

Normal operating ATF temp: 50° to 80°C (122° to 176°F)

Warning light/code comes on at 302°F

Typical Malfunction Thresholds:
Condition (A) ATF temperature: Less than 20°C (68°F)
Condition (B) ATF temperature: 110°C (230°F) or more

No. 1 ATF temperature sensor signal - ATF temperature: 115°C (239°F) or more
No. 2 ATF temperature sensor signal - ATF temperature: 115°C (239°F) or more


 

Kpack

Adventurer
I always figured anything over 200 was a bad thing myself, but here's what I could dig up. I searched for info on the A750F transmission, not Tundra specific.
What I gather is ideal below 200, but short intervals of 200-230 may be okay. Here's some good links below for further research.

Normal operating ATF temp: 50° to 80°C (122° to 176°F)

Warning light/code comes on at 302°F

Typical Malfunction Thresholds:
Condition (A) ATF temperature: Less than 20°C (68°F)
Condition (B) ATF temperature: 110°C (230°F) or more

No. 1 ATF temperature sensor signal - ATF temperature: 115°C (239°F) or more
No. 2 ATF temperature sensor signal - ATF temperature: 115°C (239°F) or more


That's a good link to read through on the FJ forums. Now that I have access to both temperature gauges, I've noticed the same behavior that they talk about in that thread. At a constant speed the TC locks and the temperature is the same as the pan. But it moves up really quick when accelerating, and will cool off quickly afterward. When towing uphill it gets up to and stays around 230 or so, and sometimes up to 245 on a long hill climb (90 degrees ambient temp). 2WD on long hills in the backcountry it will get to 200 pretty easily. Offroad in 4HI and 4LO it doesn't usually get above 180.

It's probably about time to drain and fill the transmission again. I had it flushed at the dealership after I bought it 30k miles ago, and I drained and filled 4 qts last year. My old fluid was pretty dark though.....
 

bkg

Explorer
I agree that under 200 is a good target. Anything over 220 is worthy of concern.

I have two gauges on my tacoma - scangauge and actual temp gauge with sending unit between output and first cooler. I watch both, and I trust the automated more than the scangauge (since I don’t fully know how well the computer is recording temps). There is often a 20+ degree difference between the two, but I always try to keep them under 210. Using bother factory and standalone coolers.

Similar on my f350... I’ve seen it hit 210 in traffic, so I try to watch the throttle.
 

thezentree

pretend redneck
I agree that under 200 is a good target. Anything over 220 is worthy of concern.

I have two gauges on my tacoma - scangauge and actual temp gauge with sending unit between output and first cooler. I watch both, and I trust the automated more than the scangauge (since I don’t fully know how well the computer is recording temps). There is often a 20+ degree difference between the two, but I always try to keep them under 210. Using bother factory and standalone coolers.

Similar on my f350... I’ve seen it hit 210 in traffic, so I try to watch the throttle.
Is one gauge consistently higher than the other?
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Hole in the Rock

Had a great time with a couple of people I just met, running the "Hole in the Rock" trail in Liberty, WA. This was the first time on this trail for all of us. It's about 3-1/4 mile in length, with lots of changes in elevation. Terrain varies from open, to sparse trees, to dense trees, to rocky, etc. There are some fun little obstacles spread throughout. It's probably doable in fairly stock rigs if you watch your tire placement. There are lots of exposed roots with associated ledges, making for some more entertaining climbs.

It was hot and dry when we went so the dust was bad. If the ground was wet and slick, this trail would be difficult. As it was, we had a great time and will meet up again to hit some other trails in the Liberty area.



The rigs




Some areas will force the truck to flex a bit




Land Cruiser on 37's makes everything look easy






The Squeeze.....had to tuck both mirrors and rub the slider on one side.



-Kevin
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Project: Spidertrax 1.25" wheel spacers install

Purpose: I was getting an annoying rub at full lock on the driver's frame ever since my last alignment. I was hoping that bumping the front wheels out a bit would solve that problem. Also, after lifting the front, it tucked the front wheels in and the tires were no longer flush with the fenders. The Brute Force Fab bumper and sliders make them look even more sunk in. Not a huge deal, but I was curious to see how a wider stance looked.

Materials
-Spidertrax 1.25" spacers (1 box of 2 spacers)
-19mm socket
-torque wrench
-lift/jack stands

Cost
$89 (factory cosmetic blemish)

Procedure
-Remove wheels. I used a wire brush to clean the mounting face and the threads of the lug nuts. I also applied a very thin layer of anti-seize to the mounting face to (hopefully) help prevent corrosion, being careful to keep it off the lug threads.


-Install spacers per the instructions. The kit includes red Loctite, which must be used on the factory lugs. Torque each supplied nut down to 90 ft/lbs, having someone step on the brakes and tightening in a star pattern. No impact guns here. The factory lugs cannot extend past the face of the adapter.


Install wheel again, and torque to 83 ft/lbs.


Before and after:






Looks good. But........

.....I can't use them.

The test drive didn't make it past my driveway. Just barely turning in either direction cause severe rubbing against the rear of the wheel well.




I was getting minor, intermittent rubbing on the lower edge of the plastic liner while under heavy articulation before. This was after some hammering of the pinch weld and reforming the plastic. However with the spacers on I'm full-on rubbing the firewall itself, and that's not even at the widest part of the tire.

There's no way that I should need to tub on 33's. Is this an alignment issue?? They did not give me the numbers on my last alignment. The truck drives perfectly straight, but I did notice that the rubbing was much worse/more pronounced after my last alignment. Caster not high enough??? The Camburg upper arms should allow 5-6 degrees of Caster (according to a rep I talked to), vs 2 degrees max factory spec. That should move the wheel forward a bit, right?

I should add that I'm running 285/75-16 on 4.5" backspace. Add the spacers and I'm total 3.25" backspace on the front.

On the positive side, I no longer rub the frame......
 
Last edited:

thezentree

pretend redneck
I'm not familiar with Camburg's UCAs, but I've got SPC UCAs on my 4Runner and can adjust the caster at the upper balljoint. I've got 1.25" wheel spacers on mine as well, and to clear the pinch weld at full lock I've set the caster at the UBJ forward (probably similar to what it sounds like Camburg builds into theirs) and had an alignment shop adjust the lower balljoint forward using the cam bolts. The front cam bolts are adjusted so they're pretty far inboard, and the rear cam bolts adjusted so they're outboard. The caster numbers will end up near or at the factory limits, but they're still in spec. I've gained probably an inch of clearance at the pinch weld doing this.

Is your alignment actually in spec?
 

Kpack

Adventurer
I'm not familiar with Camburg's UCAs, but I've got SPC UCAs on my 4Runner and can adjust the caster at the upper balljoint. I've got 1.25" wheel spacers on mine as well, and to clear the pinch weld at full lock I've set the caster at the UBJ forward (probably similar to what it sounds like Camburg builds into theirs) and had an alignment shop adjust the lower balljoint forward using the cam bolts. The front cam bolts are adjusted so they're pretty far inboard, and the rear cam bolts adjusted so they're outboard. The caster numbers will end up near or at the factory limits, but they're still in spec. I've gained probably an inch of clearance at the pinch weld doing this.

Is your alignment actually in spec?
Not sure if it is in spec or not as they didn't give me the numbers. I'll request them beforehand next time. I gave them instructions on what numbers I wanted....not sure if they followed that at all.


I pulled the spacers off tonight so I can drive the truck until I get the alignment figured out. I'm going to replace the crappy aftermarket cam bolts with Toyota OEM before I do that. Then hopefully I won't have any rubbing on the rear of the wheel well with or without spacers. We'll see.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Crystal Ridge Trail, Liberty WA Part 1

Two friends and I hit the Crystal Ridge Trail (4W319) in Liberty, WA on 8/19. The trail is 4.5 miles in length and climbs up and down, gaining 2500 feet total. It is rated moderate-severe, depending on conditions. It was dry when we went and not too bad. If it was wet, this trail would be very difficult and dangerous in certain spots.

Prepping for the trail. Crystal ridge is the trail on the left, and Pit Overlook is the trail on the right. Some of the pictures that follow are mine, some are from the other two guys.


Immediately it starts into some steep uphill, and gains quite a bit of elevation.


Eventually we arrived at the top of a long, steep drop. The hill is probably around 100 yards long, and is 30-35 degrees with some areas of 40 degrees. This shot gives an idea of the incline:




The drop brought us into a depression between the ridges, where there isn't as much sun. The ground was a bit wetter and there are some very deep ruts in places. 33" is the minimum to give enough clearance for the differential in these areas.




There are some fun places in this part of the trail. Deep ruts, some short steep climbs, water crossings, narrow bridges, tight spaces, etc. Eventually it let us out of the tight quarters of the shade and out onto a ridge. After a fun hill climb and rock obstacles we hit our first really nice view.


Mt Rainier


Rainier to the right and Adams to the left (hard to see)


The trail then drops up and down, curving through various terrain. Some rocky, some smooth, some tight and some open. There are a few fun little obstacles, then you reach what is affectionately known as "Rear End Hill". It's a long and steep ascent that is taxing and a little exciting. There are several sections to it, some more intense than others. But it's all uphill for a very long time.
This section was particularly fun. We chose one of the more difficult lines for fun, and lockers were helpful in the looser areas. Incline was around 35 degrees in some spots.




Continued......
 
Last edited:
Top