Yet Another White Rubicon - JLUR Build

LanceMagnum

New member
There are many, but this one is mine.

Here's a pic from one of the first outings in the White Mountains National Forest - not as easy to find secluded primitive camping as in many other national forests, but if you study the maps there are a few places:
IMG_20200702_185707.jpg
 

LanceMagnum

New member
I guess I’ll start in the front – Warn winch install
I used the Warn plate, it is a known tight fit – there are several install videos and posts out there, I would emphasize:
  • Install the winch line with the winch out of the vehicle, makes it much easier to work on. I used an auto detailer spray (contains small amount of wax) to get the retaining pin into place. If you have a platinum series you’ll need to temporarily power the winch to unlock the clutch.
  • Don’t forget to put the chafe guard onto the synthetic rope before installing it!
  • Keep things loose, and when installing the bumper bolts install the upper inside bolts early in the sequence, they have the least clearance - in particular the upper inner on the driver’s side.
My electrical circuit is a bit ‘overboard’, I have a Blue Sea remote battery switch hooked to one of the tow package aux switches. The mounting plate is one I trimmed from a Trigger controller mount:


IMG_20200908_152743.jpg

I’m running a ‘no metal’ setup – I cut off the metal thimble and re-spliced the bitter end, and I’m using a 1/2” soft shackle instead of a hook or F55 link (I also considered directly building a soft shackle out of the end of the rope). This is no doubt up for debate, but info I read shows that an eye-to-eye synthetic rope connection retains 90% of its strength if the ratio of the line size is 1:1, and 100% at 1.6:1. I have 3/8” : >1/2” so I’m somewhere in between, time will tell how this does in the real world.

https://docplayer.net/53515870-The-effect-of-bending-on-the-tensile-strength-of-statically-loaded-synthetic-ropes.html (slide 17)

Videos with splicing and stitch lock demo, feels good knowing how to deal with line repairs.


The only specialized thing I needed was a good pair of scissors for cutting the synthetic line strands (Ascend Tools 6-1/4” shears)

IMG_20200908_152755.jpgIMG_20200908_153046.jpg
 
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LanceMagnum

New member
Where is your house battery located ?
Happy to go there next – system has a Redarc manager 30 as the controller and uses 200AH of lithium, along with some other components, in the rear under-floor storage area.
6 gauge positive is run from starting battery along the top of the firewall to the driver’s side where it enters the through-hole (on automatics) next to the brake booster, then along the inside of the passenger compartment and up to the rear wheel well.

IMG_20200908_215831.jpg

Good video on removing interior trim to gain access for running wires: search for “Mopar Trailer Light Wiring Harness Install for Jeep Wrangler JL” – it shows the passenger side, but principals are the same.
Inside the storage compartment is where the 4 battery cells live, along with fuses, shunt, and a remote battery switch. The battery switch also functions as the load disconnect controlled by the manager 30 (via relay) and is hooked in series with a manual toggle kill switch and a status led.

Batt1.jpgIMG_20200908_220112.jpg

The Marinco 720-MDO remote battery switch (which draws a 5-10 milliamps depending on mode) is powered by the starting battery, so its operation is not dependent on the house battery being functional. This also lets the manger 30 go into proper storage mode during the off season.

The manager 30 implements some protections for the battery bank but in addition there is an active cell balancer operating continuously.

There are several wires running from the manager 30 to the battery that are inside the rear cargo area but my recent experience in adding an spod has taught me that there are some ways to go from the wheel well area along the inner fender and into the storage ‘tub’ from down below so I’ll be making that improvement soon.

There is also a shore power connector in the rear quarter on the passenger side – it routes up into the corner where I have a small power strip. A power cable runs across the roll bar to the manager 30 so it can charge the battery from shore power if needed.
IMG_20200908_215811.jpgIMG_20200908_215946.jpg

No solar panels in the system yet but there will be someday.

Not a whole lot connected to the house battery so far except for an inverter, converted back power plug to usb ports, and a hatch light (search for 'DIY: Rear hatch LED light strip')
IMG_20200908_215844.jpg

IMG_20200908_220200.jpg

IMG_20200908_220155.jpg'
 
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LanceMagnum

New member
For onboard air I'm using an ARB single. With the space constraints on these overland builds I try to make use of the hidden areas on the vehicle, and the single is a trade-off to take advantage of that. I was inspired by folks with JKs that used the passenger tail light cavity for their compressor. When I first checked it out on the JL the right side does not have enough space:
right1.jpg

But there is just enough room on the drivers side. I'm using the version of the compressor that comes in the portable kit, it has the smallest reservoir.
left1.jpgleft2.jpg
I used the mounting base from the kit (trimmed down slightly) and created a clamp using a piece of sheet metal that clamps to the body panels between the taillight cavity and the cavity where the door striker attaches. Some rubber weatherstripping provides a degree of isolation and it does not make any noise when driving and nothing harsh when in use.

The ARB single can be powered directly by one of the tow package 40-amp aux switches, and I ran the power cable through the firewall in the same place I used above for the BCDC charger. The power cable runs over the wheel well and down into the taillight area through the existing grommet.
left3.jpg

I'm using the filter extension kit, and the air chuck is connected through the body using a bulkhead fitting with a braided air hose between the compressor and fitting. I got my custom length braided air hose with the needed connectors from pegasusautoracing.com. The ARB fittings are 'JIC-04' which are dimensionally identical with the '4AN' fittings on the hose (they are basically the same thing except for some tolerances). This did require drilling two holes at the top of the taillight cavity and through the interior trim but the location has worked great for me.
left5.jpg1599678973055.png

Final step was to add some active cooling - I found an IP67 fan, size 120mm, that clamped onto the body in the cavity and runs whenever the compressor aux switch is powered on. You can access the 'other side' by removing the gas fill trim plate.
1599679340429.png1599679710627.png
 
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LanceMagnum

New member
So in a bid to get my teenage son to join us more often on the camping trips I told him I would build a system to give us internet in the fringe areas. I'm using a Pepwave BR1 mini (w/LTE-A modem) - there are much more sophisticated cell routers out there but this was a good match for what I was trying to accomplish. I'm using a 4-in-1 Mobilemark antenna (2 LTE, 1 WiFi, 1 GPS) mounted to an aluminum pole that goes through the roof rack and into the vehicle via a 1" cable gland.

1599686517911.png

Loosen the cable gland the you can telescope the antenna above the clutter on the rack (the black octagon is a ground plane I made from some aluminum sheet, my wife calls it 'the hat', can't unsee that now...)
1599686615934.png

A block of HDPE on the topside keeps everything aligned and provides some adjustability:
1599686736826.png

The modem/router is mounted to the outboard side of the roof rack support:
1599686924250.png

The modem power is hooked up to the spod, and that toggle switch is actually for a microwave relay I got from an ebay seller.

1599687005722.png1599687044045.png

In microwave relay speak the one I have is a 'failsafe' configuration meaning when it's turned off there is a normally closed path for one of the connections. By turning it on the 2nd connection becomes active (the unused SMA connector in the foreground). The purpose is to switch to a directional antenna that can be setup in the deep fringe areas to try and pull in a signal.

On the punch list is to run an antenna cable from the relay through the roof to an external connection where I can more easily hook up the directional antenna and mast (both are clipped to the roof rack when not deployed).

WiFi is usable within about 75'-100' of the vehicle. If you are in a good signal area the modem runs in MIMO mode which means it's using 2 cell bands and the performance is about twice what your phone would do. It can't perform magic when there is no coverage but it definitely works in areas where my phone has no usable signal.

Power draw is a just a few watts and so I leave it on all the time. The GPS vehicle tracking feature can be accessed using a web app:
1599690650638.png
 
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LanceMagnum

New member
Current project: fridge and storage

Lots of great solutions out there but I wanted to use the vehicle for a bit before deciding what works best for us. Really trying to minimize wasted space and not add weight if avoidable. I also need to be able to access the under-floor storage area to check on the battery system. Another factor is that for at least a year or so I'd like to have the possibility of having an inside sleeping area. We currently use an Xprite mattress on the passenger side.

My current design, using 1" 80/20, is to have a hinged enclosure for a marine refrigerator on the left side of the cargo area. I can leave the right side unoccupied and use plastic bins for storage. In the future I can build out the right side with some drawers.

The design is to accommodate a 65 liter Isotherm drawer fridge:
1599790120606.png

I am using CAD for the conceptual design. Autocad is not the defacto standard for 3d these days, that goes to Solidworks, but it's worth using because 80/20 has an Autocad extension that makes it easy to spec the extrusions, fasteners, and panels - and generate a bill of materials with all the correct machining. In addition, using the CAD part files from many suppliers (like drawer slides) lets me check that things will fit.

In my first design I toyed with the fridge on the right side and drawers on the left (only 1 drawer shown in this design):
1599791173341.png
But decided it would interfere with a future tailgate table and/or the door limiter. This design also has the cool double extending and locking drawers for a stove and work space. This is where I realized how much those drawer slides add to the weight. I have a nice frontrunner table that stows under the rack and is easy to setup so I will use that, and maybe it's better to cook away from the vehicle in bear country?

I had an iteration where I included the frontrunner slanted water tank that I could just make fit behind the seats:
1599791620940.png

But after realizing the value of Dan Grec's advice (on many topics!) I'm going with an underbody water tank and will find another solution to hold extra fuel for the occasions where needed (instead of an aux fuel tank underneath)

This is the base of my current design where the fridge enclosure will be on the left side. Part of the design includes an inch or so of space underneath the fridge to allow ventilation, air flows under the fridge and up the back an will exit out a vent at the top. I also had some asymmetric designs where the right side took advantage of the extra space from the 'cutout' in the door but I'm not using that in my current version.
1599792364350.png

Here's some pictures of my prototype base - it did prove nicely that taking the measurements carefully and transferring into CAD then ordering the parts according to the design really works and makes the fabrication easy and fun:

1599792780371.png

I did a subwoofer delete, there's 4 trim parts involved, but you get a good amount of space back.

Tilt for storage access - imagine the seats folded down. The trick is to get some elevation on the hinges so there's room for contents on the frame to stay above the seat hinge area when pivoted. I will remove the cargo tie downs and associated carpet/plastic bits and the 80/20 rails will be fastened to the factory bolt holes right against the sheet metal floor pan.
1599792944843.png

Closeup of current hinge design, probably more than it needs to be. This extrusion stuff is rigid and strong. I am trying to keep the design 'just enough' so in case of an accident it has a chance to crumple. I may add some unneeded joints or notches to reduce the strength. Some of those super solid steel shelves and such I see built into the back of some vehicles seem like they will just become a guillotine - I guess we are not supposed to think about that too much.
1599793354000.png

More to follow...
 
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LanceMagnum

New member
Family trip out to Race Point beach at Cape Cod National Seashore, I think my mom likes the jeep more than I do.

Ranger performs vehicle inspection for equipment and tire size:
1600006576124.png

1600005962101.png

Race Point Light:
1600005747308.png

1600006741889.png

We did Race Point North, there are a couple other areas of National Seashore beach available depending on time of year/shorebird activity, and at times it can be zero (and even at the best of times OSV access is nothing like it was decades ago).

Overnight camping is only for self-contained vehicles and limited to 'bullpen' areas.

1600010880344.png

This is one of a few places on the cape that allow OSVs

See https://www.nps.gov/caco/planyourvisit/cape-cod-national-seashore-oversand-beach-driving.htm

Also:

Nauset beach in Orleans/Chatam: https://www.town.orleans.ma.us/natural-resources-beaches-division/pages/over-sand-vehicles

Sandy Neck in Barnstable: https://tobweb.town.barnstable.ma.us/SandyNeckPark/ORVBeach/orvhome.aspx

Small section in Dennis: https://www.town.dennis.ma.us/natural-resources/road-vehicle-orv

I think the towns got together to make a puzzle, they all have a different requirement for the jack support board:

Dennis: Jack board no less than 12 x 12 x 5/8’’
National Seashore: Jack Support Board: Wood: 10" x 12" x 1.5" or Plywood: 10" x 12" x 3/4"
Orleans: Not less than 144 square inches and no more than 18" in length
Barnstable: Support board—minimum size 18” x 18”, 3/4” plywood or 1/4” thick steel.

The Barnstable standard covers it, mine is 18" x 18" x 3/4 plywood
 
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Current project: fridge and storage

Lots of great solutions out there but I wanted to use the vehicle for a bit before deciding what works best for us. Really trying to minimize wasted space and not add weight if avoidable. I also need to be able to access the under-floor storage area to check on the battery system. Another factor is that for at least a year or so I'd like to have the possibility of having an inside sleeping area. We currently use an Xprite mattress on the passenger side.

My current design, using 1" 80/20, is to have a hinged enclosure for a marine refrigerator on the left side of the cargo area. I can leave the right side unoccupied and use plastic bins for storage. In the future I can build out the right side with some drawers.

The design is to accommodate a 65 liter Isotherm drawer fridge:
View attachment 611409

I am using CAD for the conceptual design. Autocad is not the defacto standard for 3d these days, that goes to Solidworks, but it's worth using because 80/20 has an Autocad extension that makes it easy to spec the extrusions, fasteners, and panels - and generate a bill of materials with all the correct machining. In addition, using the CAD part files from many suppliers (like drawer slides) lets me check that things will fit.

In my first design I toyed with the fridge on the right side and drawers on the left (only 1 drawer shown in this design):
View attachment 611410
But decided it would interfere with a future tailgate table and/or the door limiter. This design also has the cool double extending and locking drawers for a stove and work space. This is where I realized how much those drawer slides add to the weight. I have a nice frontrunner table that stows under the rack and is easy to setup so I will use that, and maybe it's better to cook away from the vehicle in bear country?

I had an iteration where I included the frontrunner slanted water tank that I could just make fit behind the seats:
View attachment 611412

But after realizing the value of Dan Grec's advice (on many topics!) I'm going with an underbody water tank and will find another solution to hold extra fuel for the occasions where needed (instead of an aux fuel tank underneath)

This is the base of my current design where the fridge enclosure will be on the left side. Part of the design includes an inch or so of space underneath the fridge to allow ventilation, air flows under the fridge and up the back an will exit out a vent at the top. I also had some asymmetric designs where the right side took advantage of the extra space from the 'cutout' in the door but I'm not using that in my current version.
View attachment 611427

Here's some pictures of my prototype base - it did prove nicely that taking the measurements carefully and transferring into CAD then ordering the parts according to the design really works and makes the fabrication easy and fun:

View attachment 611428

I did a subwoofer delete, there's 4 trim parts involved, but you get a good amount of space back.

Tilt for storage access - imagine the seats folded down. The trick is to get some elevation on the hinges so there's room for contents on the frame to stay above the seat hinge area when pivoted. I will remove the cargo tie downs and associated carpet/plastic bits and the 80/20 rails will be fastened to the factory bolt holes right against the sheet metal floor pan.
View attachment 611430

Closeup of current hinge design, probably more than it needs to be. This extrusion stuff is rigid and strong. I am trying to keep the design 'just enough' so in case of an accident it has a chance to crumple. I may add some unneeded joints or notches to reduce the strength. Some of those super solid steel shelves and such I see built into the back of some vehicles seem like they will just become a guillotine - I guess we are not supposed to think about that too much.
View attachment 611431

More to follow...
This is awesome, I, like you, am trying to methodically design the overall scheme without wasting money or time.....but it involves a LOT of thought and planning. I have been a bit stuck by wanting to add a base plate but not wanting to loose access to the underneath storage. Mine is looking to be ARB dual compressor and a lithium aux battery. This is a great solution!! You wouldn't want to help a guy with the parts list for just the bits in the last two images would you? ;) I'm following along and like the way you are approaching things.
 

LanceMagnum

New member
No problem with the parts list, but please be aware this is still in the mock-up/prototype phase. I expect to tune the rails underneath to get the elevation I'm looking for, and I also need a solution to tie down the front of the base, I will probably find a way to tie the front cross member into the rails mounted to the floor pan.

These are the parts for the lower 'layer', the 29" rails take up all the available space when the factory tie-downs are removed and actually extend underneath the carpeted seat 'gap filler' by about 1/2"

1003-SLength
29 Inches (736.6 Millimeters)
2
1003-S5 Inches (127 Millimeters)2
41662

332112
41712


This is the back rail:
1010-S39.5 Inches (1003.3 Millimeters) 1

Front rail, "7042 in A Left; 7042 in A Right;" describes the machining steps, in this case for the counterbores to use the internal fasteners:
1010-S37.5 Inches (952.5 Millimeters) 7042 in A Left; 7042 in A Right;1

Side rails:
1010-S26.5 Inches (673.1 Millimeters) 7042 in A Left;2

Counterbore fasteners:
33954


Once again I recommend waiting until it's further along, I'm happy to update this with the bill of materials as the project progresses.

In another few weeks I expect to have the final base installed, then I'll work on the fridge enclosure and panels.
 

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LanceMagnum

New member
Some progress on the fridge enclosure - final base design is in place.

Here's the final hinge detail, the cap screw goes into the factory tie-down location, as do the other cap screws along the floor rails. I decided to keep the factory trim piece underneath the rail, a more finished appearance and gives more usable space under the frame for storage of large, flat items.

1602959582640.png

Shot of full base with mock-up of left side of fridge box:

1602959737571.png

Tilt in action, plenty of room to access underfloor storage:
1602959818902.png1602959857587.png

I'm pretty happy with the simple and compact design of the clamp system - I'm going to try to improve it by making it tool-less.
1602959937621.png

The measurements are wired tight and use the available space efficiently. The whole base can shift left or right to adjust the space on each side.
1602961077079.png

Here's the drawing of the near-final phase 1 version - I am going to try to design in some kind of pivoting leg system to hold the unit in the up position:
1602960046104.png

Parts are on order for completion of phase 1 but 8020 is taking a long time to get machined pieces delivered (like 4 weeks or more). I'll update the post when it's complete.
 
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