Yakima SkyRise RTT

Beowulf

Expedition Leader
#1
Let's discuss the new Yakima SkyRise RTT.

*First hand experience
*Quality
*Durability
*Features
*Etc....



Rugged 210D nylon tent body is certified fire-resistant, breathable and exceptionally lightweight
Mesh panel improves ventilation, allows view of starry skies
210D nylon rainfly with PU coating is waterproof and durable
Spring steel rainfly poles are light and strong
2.5-inch high-density foam mattress with waterproof bottom
Fast and simple vehicle attachment – no tools required
Universal crossbar compatibility
Locks to base rack with SKS (Same Key System) Lock Cores for added security


SkyRise Medium

Dimensions: 56” x 96” x 48” H (expanded); 56” x 48” x 12” (folded)
Weight: 90 lbs.
Sleeps 3 adults
MSRP: $1,349
Available: Spring 2017

SkyRise Small

Dimensions: 48” x 84” x 42” H (expanded); 48” x 42” x 12” (folded)
Weight: 75 lbs.
Sleeps 2 adults
MSRP: $999
Available: Spring 2017








 

Box Rocket

Adventure Fan
#4
I was able to take a closer look at these at the Outdoor Retailer show as well. Yakima's entrance into the RTT (car camping) scene is a sure sign that overlanding and car camping is becoming mainstream for sure. Here's my observations. It's much lighter duty than most other RTT offerings on the market. I know Yakima is using that as a selling point as it is a relatively lightweight tent. But the internal bows and base are smaller and not quite as robust as what you see on other brands. The telescoping ladder is the same. Significantly smaller tubes and appears like it might be less sturdy that others. I don't have exact figures on the weight rating for the ladder so maybe it's not that bad in reality, I'm just going off of my brief visual inspection at the show.
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The overall design is similar to other brands but different as well. Every brand goes through some growing pains in perfecting design and materials used (unless it's one of the many blatant copy cat designs, but even then cheaper materials are often used in these copy cat tents). I expect that Yakima will experience some similar growing pains and find areas that need improvement or tweaks. Other reputable brands have been through that already and likely have less "weak links".
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It is still an interesting tent and will add a LOT of mainstream exposure to RTT's in general because of the large Yakima customer base that has never paid attention to the overland scene or other communities that use RTTs more frequently. The lightweight aspect will be attractive to some. I'll point out however, that the new Tepui Baja series tents are even lighter when the mesh canopy is used. I'm share the same interest as the rest of you though. I'm very curious to see how Yakima does as a new entry into the market. I will give them credit for not being one of the many copy cat brands that just "borrowed" an existing design and did nothing to include anything of their own in the design.
 

Box Rocket

Adventure Fan
#6
Beowulf, you may have seen my reply to your post in the Tepui Baja Series thread regarding weight. I stand corrected about the weight comparison between the Yakima and the Baja Series. If the Yakima has a total weight of 90lbs, the Baja Series is just slightly heavier at 102lbs but with a much sturdier frame.
 

Christophe Noel

Expedition Leader
#7
Yakima's entrance into the RTT (car camping) scene is a sure sign that overlanding and car camping is becoming mainstream for sure.
As someone who has worked in the outdoor industry for a very long time, and given my vantage point within overlanding, I see a different slant. I don't see the overland segment growing as much as I see the overlanding and outdoor audiences overlapping. Walk the isles of Outdoor Retailer and few people will consider themselves as "overlanders." That doesn't mean there isn't an ever increasing number of people with Sportsmobiles, built-out trucks, and know their way around a winch. To them, such vehicles are a cool tool. They are part of the outdoor lifestyle. Within that, I don't necessarily think that all outdoor enthusiasts see the need for an RTT of Eezi-Awn caliber.

I do know that Mike, the lead on the Yakima RTT has ample experience in the 4x4 and overlanding scene, not just as an observer, but as a participant and industry professional. So, i think they see their market audience rather clearly.

We're seeing lots of markets merge as of late. That includes fly fishermen, skiers, climbers, mountain bikers, motorcyclists, general travelers and of course, traditional overlanders. So, it's not an expansion of overlanding we're seeing with things like the SkyRise, it is a wider acceptance of the various tools of overlanding as they apply to other lifestyles. That's a good thing.
 

Box Rocket

Adventure Fan
#8
As someone who has worked in the outdoor industry for a very long time, and given my vantage point within overlanding, I see a different slant. I don't see the overland segment growing as much as I see the overlanding and outdoor audiences overlapping. Walk the isles of Outdoor Retailer and few people will consider themselves as "overlanders." That doesn't mean there isn't an ever increasing number of people with Sportsmobiles, built-out trucks, and know their way around a winch. To them, such vehicles are a cool tool. They are part of the outdoor lifestyle. Within that, I don't necessarily think that all outdoor enthusiasts see the need for an RTT of Eezi-Awn caliber.

I do know that Mike, the lead on the Yakima RTT has ample experience in the 4x4 and overlanding scene, not just as an observer, but as a participant and industry professional. So, i think they see their market audience rather clearly.

We're seeing lots of markets merge as of late. That includes fly fishermen, skiers, climbers, mountain bikers, motorcyclists, general travelers and of course, traditional overlanders. So, it's not an expansion of overlanding we're seeing with things like the SkyRise, it is a wider acceptance of the various tools of overlanding as they apply to other lifestyles. That's a good thing.
That is a better, more accurate description of what I was trying to say. I agree with what you are saying about many of the "tools" we are familiar with are gaining more widespread acceptance in the outdoor world. Roof tents are one of those things that have taken off within other groups, such as fans of music festivals, surfers, fisherman and others none of which would classify as overlanders.
Well stated.
 

robert

Expedition Leader
#9
Egads, why red? It looks cool but who wants to hang out in a red light district (don't answer that :sombrero: )? Maybe some more neutral colors that don't look like the interior of a submarine on alert. Maybe it's just red to stand out at the show? Neat to see other people getting into the market though.
 
#10
How does this compare to the Feather Lite RTT offered by Front Runner? The Feather Lite is approximately same size, weight, price, etc.
 

Christophe Noel

Expedition Leader
#11
How does this compare to the Feather Lite RTT offered by Front Runner? The Feather Lite is approximately same size, weight, price, etc.
Good question. My guess is they are similar on many levels. The biggest differentiator that I can see is the massive network of Yakima dealers in virtually every town the the US. The quick release attachments are slick as well.
 

kojackJKU

Autism Family Travellers!
#12
I am looking at a RTT. I want to swap between my patriot and Wrangler. will this fit 2 adult and one child? and anyone have pictures of it folded up?
 
#14
Slightly off-topic observation on the popularity of RTT's ...
I just got home from a 5 week, 10000 mile trip cross-country and back, in my Tacoma plus Tepui, with lots of wandering about through 25+ states. Not truly "overlanding, all in the US and at least half on Interstates (time and logistic reasons) but lots of back roads and about 150 miles of dirt with some remote dispersed camping, plus lots of BLM, National Forest and National Park campgrounds. Actually deployed in campgrounds I stayed in, I saw ONE hard-shell RTT and ONE Tepui. On the road, I noticed less than five RTT's mounted on vehicles. I saw two DeTomaso Panteras in Nebraska on I-80 but no RTT's in that long segment of highway.. None in two days in Moab, either. I saw a couple of Earthroamers and two FlipPacs in the West, a zillion Sprinters and many FWC's. Every time I camped, people came up and marveled at my Tepui. A few had heard of them ... seen them on the Internet but never in person. A salesman at the Toyota dealer near Salt Lake City, outdoor capital of the US, where I took my truck for service, was full of questions; again, he'd read about them but never seen one. That said, I live in Santa Cruz, and I see 5 Tepui's a day, many mounted on cars or small CUV's. So, this is either a growing market in its infancy or it's saturated and going nowhere, but it's good to see a new player. However, I don't see huge value in the tool-less mounting: spinning a wrench is easy compared to lifting and installing or removing a 100+ pound large object on the roof of a tall vehicle.
 
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