Wrist watches for the adventure-minded?

Beowulf

Expedition Leader
#46
Yes, absolutely love the SKX173 and SKX007. I have several all with different bezels and I switch out the bracelets to suit the occasion.
 
#47
My dad gave me his old field watch (Sicura Pilot) 20-30 years ago but the crystal was chipped. It sat in a box forever. As an anniversary present my wife had the crystal replaced and now it’s one of my favorite old school watches.
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My everyday go to work watch is my tried and true Sunnto Vector.
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Peneumbra2

Badger Wrangler
#48
For the past couple years I've worn a Seiko automatic mechanical dive watch from the early '90s. Great watch, but it is running about 10-15 minutes fast per day, so I'm gonna have to send it out for service.
I've just purchased a slightly used Hamilton 1000-meter auto/mech. dive watch off e-bay. Huge, heavy, apparently near-indestructible, 46 mm case, 18 mm thick, special sapphire crystal, etc. etc. It has that gas release button so that if you overeat, you won't feel bloated afterward! Wait - I may be wrong on that part.
Now, honestly, the chances of my saturation-diving to anything close to 1000 meters (3300+feet) are less than zero. But we Do have a deeper-than-normal hot tub...
 
#51
I got a Garmin vivoactive for Christmas this year. I have worn it every day since. I love it. The watch face is awesome with so much cool information on it, I have a GPS topo map app on it for hiking and what not. My favorite watch to date, and I have Rolex, breitling etc.
 
#53
Hey watch lovers of EXPO.

I have a GPW Mission (Automatic) - Titanium Date watch w/ rubber strap

I used this watch for six years while serving as a Rescue Swimmer in the United States Navy.
It was a gift from my father after graduation from SAR (Search And Rescue) school. The watch has performed admirably and to my surprise the Crystal sight glass has absolutely zero marks on it. The Titanium case has been "seasoned" as I have over 400 flights while wearing this watch in countless environments to include Frozen mountains in Canada during multinational training to the desert in the middle east. Overall the watch is great for the money in my opinion. The bezel has held up and holds its position well for timing for dives, medical applications like tourniquets for back up if the blood smears on your casualty.

If you are looking for a classy rugged watch for true applications look no further.

Link to their full site
https://arctoswatches.myshopify.com/

Link to my specific model
https://arctoswatches.myshopify.com/collections/gpw-military/products/gpwautpu

**The only issue I had with the watch is the spring bars that lock in the band to the watch have failed and have needed to be replaced but have held up since then**
 

Fireman78

Expedition Leader
#54
Recently picked up the toughest watch on planet earth. Casio Mudmaster G Shock. GWG-1000. Tough solar, triple sensor, atomic timekeeping. Absolutely solid piece of equipment.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
#56
Chalk up another for the Luminox 3000 series dive watches. Right now I am daily and adventure wearing a 3020 series. I have owned several Luminox watches and really enjoy them. I personally like the durability and simplicity of a good old fashioned hardened analog watch. These things take a serious beating and the many first responders and military service members who wear them can attest to this as well. Waterproof to about a million miles underwater and the trivium inserts make it easy to read the watch in with dark without the need to actuate a button or carry out a motion. Even better yet, they clean up and wash easily after getting them dirty during the many adventures they tag along on my wrist for. I use heck out of the rotating bezels as well and they have never failed. Lastly, with even just a little bit of sun, you can use an analog watch to find North and orientate from there.
 
#57
I’m a bit of a watch nerd- but I took it up a notch and taught myself repair as well. It’s easier now with so many youtoob videos but not so easy when I started out...

The Rolex Explorer is probably the field watch to have. That said, I don’t have one. And I like having a date complication.

I do have a ‘73 1680 I restored. That’s probably the “gem” of my collection although I think the Tudor 9411 is a cooler watch. Those both have the date.

No date I have (true) “Steve McQueen” ‘67 5512. A super cool watch that no one but me cares about. But I’m fine with that.

Omega Speedmaster Mk. II from 1969 I’m wearing as I type this is not worn often but I really like it. I have the original bracelet but wear it on a rubber dive strap to make it more modern and hold it in place- the head is heavy and bracelet is light so it works better on a strap.

My other Omega is a Planet Ocean. On the rubber strap as well. I’m feeling it’s a bit big now (45.5mm) but do wear it occasionally. The lume will burn holes in your shirt cuffs...

The Seiko SKX007J is a true tool watch. Why? Well, you can literally drive nails with it and it’ll still keep good time. Day and date complications for very little money. Why DOESNT everyone have one?!?

But the best “expedition “ watch is probably the Omega Moon Watch. Speedmaster Professional with the hand wind 821 movement (post ‘68) only because there are a billion of them and it’s like a small block Chevy to repair, and fitted with the solid back and plastic crystal. Yes, you have to wind it each day and no, it does not have the date. But it ticks many boxes for durability, reliability, reasonable cost, moderate water resistance (50m I believe) and holds value well if you really get in a jam and need cash. The Rolex trumps here but they can attract the wrong attention too...

If you expedition with a quartz watch, and why not- super shock resistance and incredible accuracy- remember to service before you go. Fresh battery, seals and a pressure test.
 
#58
The Seiko SKX007J is a true tool watch. Why? Well, you can literally drive nails with it and it’ll still keep good time. Day and date complications for very little money. Why DOESNT everyone have one?!?
This is the answer for me. I wear my SKX every day for pretty much everything, besides wrenching, working out and sometimes skiing when my G-Shock(one of the old-school square ones) gets a little wrist time. And that's only because the SKX gets in the way a bit and gets gross if I'm sweating on it and getting oil on it all the time, not because it wouldn't work fine for those activities too. It's the ultimate tool watch because it's versatile, good looking, and tough enough that you never have to worry while being cheap enough that you won't. I'm a bit of a watch nerd myself, but my collection is a little lame consisting of the SKX, the G-Shock and a Seiko SNK(my first mechanical watch). I can't bring myself to spend thousands of bucks on a luxury piece and I have yet to find a watch in the >$500 range that I think would get enough wrist time over the SKX to be worthwile.

But the best “expedition “ watch is probably the Omega Moon Watch. Speedmaster Professional with the hand wind 821 movement (post ‘68) only because there are a billion of them and it’s like a small block Chevy to repair, and fitted with the solid back and plastic crystal. Yes, you have to wind it each day and no, it does not have the date. But it ticks many boxes for durability, reliability, reasonable cost, moderate water resistance (50m I believe) and holds value well if you really get in a jam and need cash. The Rolex trumps here but they can attract the wrong attention too...
Also, I have to disagree on the Speedy. I love Speedies and if I ever decide to buy a luxury watch it's almost definitely going to be a Speedmaster Professional but it has to be the basic square solar/atomic G-Shock like mine for the best actual 'expedition' watch:




It does everything the Speedmaster does, it keeps incredibly good time even if it's not receiving radio syncs(I lived in a concrete apartment building once where it didn't get syncs at night and live too far to get syncs from Colorado during the day. It went a good 4 months without a sync and when I checked it against the official atomic time it wasn't even a full second off. The battery stays charged by solar power and is never a concern, it can apparently fully function for 8 months in total darkness. I've never worried about keeping it in a lit area, don't wear it very much and I've never seen it indicating anything besides full charge. It'll survive literally anything and it costs less than $100. I don't think the value thing is really relevant. In this day and age if you're somewhere that someone could afford to buy the Speedmaster for decent money there is certainly an ATM nearby and that $4,000 could be sitting in your bank account in liquid form instead of on your wrist in illiquid form.

I get the appeal of wearing a mechanical watch over a digital one for intangible reasons, but at the end of the day if we're talking about practical benefits on an expedition they're all here. Also, the non-solar and non-radio version of that watch is Space Filght certified(radio sync and solar charging would be pretty pointless in space..) for the ultimate expedition, just like the Moonwatch.
 
#59
(Doomsday spoiler)

There is one thing all digital and Quartz watches are susceptible to: EMP.

Of course at that point you may have other priorities to concern yourself with.

Actually that digital reminds me of the Seiko Quartz chronograph. I believe they made the worlds first and some were used in the original Alien movie. That would also be a good choice, and has 1/10 second resolution.

Casio was one of our sponsors and I had a titanium digital with radio etc. the logo was a mountainside but I don’t remember the name. I wore it for the trip but sold it after. Might have been the arctic circle.

But that intangible is there for me- I need a machine on my wrist, even if it’s a quartz controlled one, rather than a digital with zero moving parts. It’s a watch thing.
 
#60
(Doomsday spoiler)

There is one thing all digital and Quartz watches are susceptible to: EMP.

Of course at that point you may have other priorities to concern yourself with.
First of all, the EMP argument is unlikely and ridiculous. Second, it's actually pretty unlikely that small electronics like digital watches would be effected by an EMP(but most preppers don't bother to learn about the science behind EMPs, just electronics=bad).

But that intangible is there for me- I need a machine on my wrist, even if it’s a quartz controlled one, rather than a digital with zero moving parts. It’s a watch thing.
I get that and I'm the same way. I only really wear my G-Shock when the size and weight are beneficial, the other 99% of the time it's my SKX. Just, if we're practically saying what the *best* watch is for an expedition and not the watch we would most want to wear on an expedition. There's no real practical benefit to mechanical watches at this point(and that's okay, I wouldn't have anything else either.
 
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