Winnebago EKKO

gregmchugh

Observer
Other than inertia, I just don't get why they stick with propane.
It is a relatively high volume production operation compared to Nimbl, EC, etc and this model is a big step for them into a new type of RV. They are trying out new components and suppliers in many areas with the EKKO and not taking on new stuff in other areas. Propane is tried and true and Truma has been a good partner so they didn’t innovate much in that area and avoided risks of new designs and suppliers in the heating, hot water, and cooktop. They are going to be investing a lot in what will probably be a very popular new RV and it’s reputation would be tarnished by problems in what should be low risk components. When their customers get the bug for removing propane they will respond, that is probably not a big demand at the moment.

Also, Winnebago has designed the EKKO to be easy to modify by customers since they are seeing this as a trend with the Revel customers. They seem to be pretty good in the Class B market segment in responding to customers feedback and the EKKO is really an extension of what they started with the Revel where they addressed customers desires for a more rugged Class B and saw that it created a big aftermarket for upgrades. For a high volume manufacturer they are doing pretty well at moving into a new market.
 

DiploStrat

Expedition Leader
Having had two inductions, I will only note that you need to be able to budget between 25 and 50Ah for a meal for two persons. That poses a load on the electrical system of a conventional RV.
 

gregmchugh

Observer
Having had two inductions, I will only note that you need to be able to budget between 25 and 50Ah for a meal for two persons. That poses a load on the electrical system of a conventional RV.
True but the EKKO comes standard with a 320 AH lithium battery with the option of a second 320 AH battery. Our current truck has 720 AH lithium and we have no problems with a dual burner induction cooktop and a countertop electric oven. If I bought one, I would definitely have the second battery in the EKKO and switch to an induction cooktop.
 

pugslyyy

Expedition Vehicle Engineer Guy
True but the EKKO comes standard with a 320 AH lithium battery with the option of a second 320 AH battery. Our current truck has 720 AH lithium and we have no problems with a dual burner induction cooktop and a countertop electric oven. If I bought one, I would definitely have the second battery in the EKKO and switch to an induction cooktop.
Yep. diesel cooktops will still have their fans (just like I am a diehard white-fuel fan for reasons I sometimes struggle to articulate, like when the whole stove catches fire on startup), but for the vast majority of folks Induction is the way to go today.
 

Keyne

Adventurer
Are you sure about this? There are many RV’s from major manufacturers that use diesel heat and hot water with Induction cooktops (look at most large Class A’s) and no propane. I don’t think Advanced RV has used propane on most of their Class B’s either.
I have an all electric 2017 Roadtrek Sprinter Agile and it has the RV Certification and had zero problems at any campground and we camp a lot in privately owned campgrounds.
 

gregmchugh

Observer
Yep. diesel cooktops will still have their fans (just like I am a diehard white-fuel fan for reasons I sometimes struggle to articulate, like when the whole stove catches fire on startup), but for the vast majority of folks Induction is the way to go today.
I still have my Svea 123 white fuel stove that I bought for backpacking in 1968. Still works fine and I take it hiking. Familiar with the startup fire... :)

Colin Fletcher must have gotten a whole lot of those stoves sold...
 

Keyne

Adventurer
Been reading up a bit on the Ekko and I have to admit that I am warming up to it. Similar to the Revel, it's not for everyone but for those looking for a less expensive (assume list price less 25%) introduction to Overlanding it could be a nice option. It is significantly less expensive than a GXV Turtle, Earthroamer, Earthcruiser, etc. and a good alternative to a DIY build with a Total Composites box. Sure not as great as those solutions but you get good solar, lithium, 4-season capable, AWD (not 4x4), nice garage storage (with Molle, lights, heat, and L-track already setup), and a GAS engine (no DEF so S. America would be easier). All of that in a package with the length of a Sprinter/Transit van (23 feet). Seems like a really nice solution for "rough roads" not necessary offroading. I can imagine using it in the US on gravel roads, etc., and heading south to Baja or shipping it to Argentina and driving through Chile.

I wonder if you can get "super singles' for a Ford Transit... but there are good suspension options available for the Transit now that could help with ground clearance, etc.
 
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DiploStrat

Expedition Leader
True but the EKKO comes standard with a 320 AH lithium battery with the option of a second 320 AH battery. Our current truck has 720 AH lithium and we have no problems with a dual burner induction cooktop and a countertop electric oven. If I bought one, I would definitely have the second battery in the EKKO and switch to an induction cooktop.
Note, I said conventional. I have used an induction cooktop since 2013. Also had a diesel cooktop in the Tiger, but found it to be a bit of a pain. Of course, I have always had 600Ah. AGM today, Lithium Iron soon.
 

Victorian

Approved Vendor : Total Composites
Been reading up a bit on the Ekko and I have to admit that I am warming up to it. Similar to the Revel, it's not for everyone but for those looking for a less expensive (assume list price less 25%) introduction to Overlanding it could be a nice option. It is significantly less expensive than a GXV Turtle, Earthroamer, Earthcruiser, etc. and a good alternative to a DIY build with a Total Composites box. Sure not as great as those solutions but you get good solar, lithium, 4-season capable, AWD (not 4x4), nice garage storage (with Molle, lights, heat, and L-track already setup), and a GAS engine (no DEF so S. America would be easier). All of that in a package with the length of a Sprinter/Transit van (23 feet). Seems like a really nice solution for "rough roads" not necessary offroading. I can imagine using it in the US on gravel roads, etc., and heading south to Baja or shipping it to Argentina and driving through Chile.

I wonder if you can get "super singles' for a Ford Transit... but there are good suspension options available for the Transit now that could help with ground clearance, etc.
You can order the Transit with single rear wheels. We did for ours.
 

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Big Rudy

Member
With that info the factory SRW option really would not work.
Victorian would you mind sharing your finished weight?
 
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