Winnebago EKKO

Jonnyo

Observer
I am curious as to what offroading you have done with your dually. That term means different things to different people and I would be interested in how you define it (or rather use it) in that case.
i would say light offroading. The kind of offroading you can do with a class C /B motorhome that you lift and get some extra clerance. So logging road and forestery road of BC and alberta and rocky or sandy beaches etc. The transit platform is still limited in what it can do...and i dont think making it a super single make it more capable. But i definitly dont have the capability of offroading like the vehicle you have in your picture!
 

waveslider

Outdoorsman
OK that makes sense, Thanks. So your dually has spent more/most time on gravel roads, which for the record ours has too. The "offroad" capability of our truck is a sort-of 'last mile' utility that allows us to press on over rough, rocky or extremely uneven terrain to cover the last bit and escape crowds or reach a specific campsite - and was just wondering if you were taking a dually in such places.
 

lbarcher

Adventurer
I think the term "offroad" needs to be re-defined.
From my perspective, if you can drive a grader down it it is a road. Gravel or otherwise.
A road is not something that is solely paved.
 

Jonnyo

Observer
yes, i think we all have different view on what is offroad. in the context of this thread and talking about the EKKO and where you can take it, you can do some light offroad but it remain a house on wheel that was designed for paved road mostly. clearance is limited. Having 2 or 4 wheel at the back dosnt change where you can go.
 
The British have a useful definition: there’s “made roads”, which means paved and dirt/gravel made or improved with equipment like a grader or bulldozer.
And then there’s “unmade roads”: sandy tracks, “two-tracks”, beaches, etc.
A California example of made roads might be the Waucoba road out of Independence, turning right into Saline Valley and again ascending back up to Hwy 190. Doesn’t matter if it’s washboard, it gets a grader at least once a year and definitely doesn’t require 4wd or high ground clearance or traction diffs.
On the other hand the side road to the hot springs and most especially after the hot springs ascending to Steele Pass and Eureka Valley is an unmade road.
 

pugslyyy

Expedition Vehicle Engineer Guy
I like to say that our expedition campers are "rough road" vehicles, not "off road" vehicles. They are too big, too heavy, and too expensive to take rock crawling, mudding, etc., but do great down basic forest service roads, washes, etc. Whether they can do Steele Pass depends on the condition of the wash down into Saline and the confidence of the driver - Dedeckera Canyon wouldn't be a problem, nor Goler Wash/Butte Valley/Warm Springs in SW Death Valley.

I'm a great believer in having front and rear air/electronic lockers in these big vehicles. It allows you a much more controlled transit of obstacles and tricky sections - most of the time you can idle your way through with only a little throttle input v. having to "send it" to overcome cross-axle low traction situations.
 
It all depends on the vehicle and the driver. But if it’s only good for “made” dirt roads, it’s not an offroad vehicle.
I suppose my vehicle is at the far end of that spectrum. A vehicle with not much ground clearance, small tires (single or dual), no lockers, not any low gearing is at the other end.
 
I've been looking into an EKKO for a while, its really between that and a new REVEL. I really can't wait for these to get in more peoples hands. I'd love to see it with a 2-4 inch lift and see what it can doo off the pavement.
 

Photomike

White Turtle Adventures
I've been looking into an EKKO for a while, its really between that and a new REVEL. I really can't wait for these to get in more peoples hands. I'd love to see it with a 2-4 inch lift and see what it can doo off the pavement.

A word of warning. Before my current vehicle I had a class C which was a lot like the EKKO. I LOVED all the features. It was like a second home with EVERYTHING, no roughing it there.

The issue was the width.

First trip out on a paved road I head a weird sound. As I was trying to figure out the noise my son started laughing and said our right side mirror was hitting tree branches. I checked where I was on the road and my left wheels were just about on the center line. I moved over till the noise stopped and I was over the center line. My mirrors were a LONG way over the line and would hit any oncoming vehicle. I drove like that for a while till I came upon a cyclist and I had to pull even more into the other lane to clear him. I tried it on a number of other roads and it was just too wide on the body and especially with the mirrors, I never felt comfortable with it.

In the back country I got squeezed a few times with the mirrors in. The body could not navigate down the narrower roads and kept scraping objects. Wheel base was the same as my TCer, Van, etc, but the body width so low down was the issue. Even with a lift you would still be too wide for many trails unless you lifted it 2 feet or more.

The last straw was going to a local park one day to take some pictures, it was cold so I took the C with the heat on. Going down one of the roads I got stuck when I meant another vehicle coming in the other direction. I was taking up a lane and some of the other with the body and a lot when you considered the mirrors and I could not pull over enough for us to pass.

I measured the heck out of that unit and it was the same width as my truck camper but the truck camper's width was up higher so the mirrors were narrower and I had more clearance lower down in the width.

If you are looking at narrower roads consider this.
 

martinf

Member
Yes, width can be an issue on larger motorhomes. However the Ekko house is about the same width as the Transit chassis and its got the regular mirrors, not the extended ones traditional class Cs have. Overall width is 1.5" wider than a Revel on a Sprinter chassis which goes pretty much everywhere.



A word of warning. Before my current vehicle I had a class C which was a lot like the EKKO. I LOVED all the features. It was like a second home with EVERYTHING, no roughing it there.

The issue was the width.

First trip out on a paved road I head a weird sound. As I was trying to figure out the noise my son started laughing and said our right side mirror was hitting tree branches. I checked where I was on the road and my left wheels were just about on the center line. I moved over till the noise stopped and I was over the center line. My mirrors were a LONG way over the line and would hit any oncoming vehicle. I drove like that for a while till I came upon a cyclist and I had to pull even more into the other lane to clear him. I tried it on a number of other roads and it was just too wide on the body and especially with the mirrors, I never felt comfortable with it.

In the back country I got squeezed a few times with the mirrors in. The body could not navigate down the narrower roads and kept scraping objects. Wheel base was the same as my TCer, Van, etc, but the body width so low down was the issue. Even with a lift you would still be too wide for many trails unless you lifted it 2 feet or more.

The last straw was going to a local park one day to take some pictures, it was cold so I took the C with the heat on. Going down one of the roads I got stuck when I meant another vehicle coming in the other direction. I was taking up a lane and some of the other with the body and a lot when you considered the mirrors and I could not pull over enough for us to pass.

I measured the heck out of that unit and it was the same width as my truck camper but the truck camper's width was up higher so the mirrors were narrower and I had more clearance lower down in the width.

If you are looking at narrower roads consider this.
 
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