Winnebago EKKO

Pretty darn sweet at the asking price and even more killer based on what some people have gotten quotes for in the 140k range. With a lift and some aftermarket AWD upgrades could be a sweet rig for some folks. What do ya’ll think? I know it’s not in the same league as discuss on here.



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Victorian

Approved Vendor : Total Composites
$170.000 no thanks. The build quality in this range needs to be a lot better than what Winnebago is famous for. just putting it on a awd drive chassis doesn’t make it more capable.... look at the ground clearance and departure angle!
 

gregmchugh

Observer
As mentioned, with the normal discounts on Winnebago the price will be down around $140k. For that price I think it will be an attractive buy with standard lithium batteries, Truma heat and hot water, auxiliary engine alternator for battery charging, decent solar power, cassette, large fresh water and grey water tanks, full 4 season capability. The build quality of these Winnebagos is better than the typical US RV but not at the level of the expedition vehicle makers which are going to cost more. Could you build a better one using Total Composites panels, sure, but unless you are doing it yourself I don’t see a huge savings. Will it be as capable off road as other options, probably not but most people just want to travel on dirt/gravel which this should handle. Still think it is a good value at that price.
 

skirunman

New member
I think it will be successful with the limitations others have pointed out here. I personally don't want dualies on my AWD even though others are OK with that and I'd prefer no propane. Also, to sleep 1-2 kids you need a pop-top and I don't like how the dinette is set up.
 

Pinnacle Campers

Chateau spotter
@skirunman there is a RTT option with an inside access noted on the floorplan.
Dinette is the two front seats swiveled around to the second row bench with Lagun table swivel.

A lift could be installed with a call to Van Compass and delivery of parts to the closest tire shop to the Winnebago dealer....I bet most Winne dealers will install the lift as well....
I'm not in the market and 'my version' would be different but I think its a good "buy it and go" option and "forward thinking" on Winnebago's part.
EDIT: I was surprised they went propane, although this is a "NA" rig. I would expect an all electric version in the future.
 

gregmchugh

Observer
@skirunman there is a RTT option with an inside access noted on the floorplan.
Dinette is the two front seats swiveled around to the second row bench with Lagun table swivel.

A lift could be installed with a call to Van Compass and delivery of parts to the closest tire shop to the Winnebago dealer....I bet most Winne dealers will install the lift as well....
I'm not in the market and 'my version' would be different but I think its a good "buy it and go" option and "forward thinking" on Winnebago's part.
EDIT: I was surprised they went propane, although this is a "NA" rig. I would expect an all electric version in the future.
In this case, I think propane is the way to go. Gasoline engine so you would have reduced options for heat and hot water vs diesel. Induction cooktop would be nice though. Propane set up with two standard tanks is a good choice making refills easy.
 

Victorian

Approved Vendor : Total Composites
In this case, I think propane is the way to go. Gasoline engine so you would have reduced options for heat and hot water vs diesel. Induction cooktop would be nice though. Propane set up with two standard tanks is a good choice making refills easy.
As far as I understand: Propane is still the going standard with the RV industry. This is based on the regulation that you can only get RV classification if you have a propane system on board. Without the RV classification customers could have issues entering certain RV parks/campgrounds or option insurance/financing. Anything else, would require a special process.
 

Bhoads

New member
The Ekko market seems somewhat similar to the Tiger Adventure Vehicle market. I would think the Tigers would do a bit better on rough roads, but price/size is somewhat similar.
 

Victorian

Approved Vendor : Total Composites
I just love this one. I've seen it before. Trust me, if they care whether or not my RV is a certified RV or whatever, I didn't want to stay there to begin with.
Seams silly, but i'ts true. Best example: I did a 11 month bicycle trip through North America. I was not allowed in primitive campgrounds in Southern California as I did not have a grey water tank... Not making this ******** up! At the same time as I was arguing with the camp host, I saw someone washing their RV.
 

gregmchugh

Observer
As far as I understand: Propane is still the going standard with the RV industry. This is based on the regulation that you can only get RV classification if you have a propane system on board. Without the RV classification customers could have issues entering certain RV parks/campgrounds or option insurance/financing. Anything else, would require a special process.
Are you sure about this? There are many RV’s from major manufacturers that use diesel heat and hot water with Induction cooktops (look at most large Class A’s) and no propane. I don’t think Advanced RV has used propane on most of their Class B’s either.
 

DiploStrat

Expedition Leader
As far as I understand: Propane is still the going standard with the RV industry. This is based on the regulation that you can only get RV classification if you have a propane system on board. Without the RV classification customers could have issues entering certain RV parks/campgrounds or option insurance/financing. Anything else, would require a special process.
???? Haven't had propane on two vehicles since 2013 and never had any question but that they were RVs. Certainly no problem at campgrounds - they don't care.
 

gdaut

Active member
I believe Nimbl recently announced they had obtained the RV certification, and those campers do not have propane. Maybe the regs have changed, given the increased capacity of newer battery systems.

That Winne has a big pass-thru from the cab to the camper and no apparent way to block it off (it looks like the driver and passenger seats are an integral part of the camper furniture). That would be nice in most circumstances, but it will make it a lot less efficient to heat the camper. And propane heat is not efficient to start with. So, probably. not the best design for winter use, although I expect the target audience does not do a lot of really cold weather camping.
 

gregmchugh

Observer
I believe Nimbl recently announced they had obtained the RV certification, and those campers do not have propane. Maybe the regs have changed, given the increased capacity of newer battery systems.

That Winne has a big pass-thru from the cab to the camper and no apparent way to block it off (it looks like the driver and passenger seats are an integral part of the camper furniture). That would be nice in most circumstances, but it will make it a lot less efficient to heat the camper. And propane heat is not efficient to start with. So, probably. not the best design for winter use, although I expect the target audience does not do a lot of really cold weather camping.
Probably can help to put some good insulated covers on the cab windows like the ones from RREGlobal.


The Truma propane heater is pretty efficient as propane heaters go compared to the old style RV propane furnace but you can’t get around the 50% BTU/lb advantage of diesel fuel vs propane or the more efficient storage of diesel fuel vs propane.
 
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Jonnyo

Observer
i really like the direction of winnebago with this one. it s not perfect, far from it but i like this compact size and that bathroom/shower combo. But i think it s time to go away from propane and be on induction and also have a drop down bed for the front.

What i would really like is for Hymer to come to north america with there line of MLT. Those unit seems well done.

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