Will this radio transmit on GMRS frequencies?

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
Under the new rules gmrs cannot talk to FRS for new radios. I’d stick to high power channels or buy a separate FRS handheld.
Didn't the 2017 rule change make those interstitial channels shared? So GMRS can use them but they may find FRS users there, too. Previously GMRS had no 467 MHz simplex allocation, but by splitting the repeater inputs and using 12.5KHz bandwidth they do at 1/2 watt, just like an FRS user.


Now why the FCC would allocate a shared channel using the same power and bandwidth and not expect a user to talk across services I couldn't say.
 

rnArmy

Adventurer
I'm thinking of holding off on getting one of those BTECH 25W dual band radios - at least for use with GMRS frequencies. In further conversation with the trip group leader, it sounds like my little 5W UV-5R will be sufficient. Thank-you to those who took the time to explain it to me. It has been most educational.

I was originally looking at a Yaesu FT-7900R, but 1. They don't seem to make them anymore (I guess replaced by the Yaesu FTM-7250DR), and 2. I would still be running into the same issues trying to use GMRS frequencies with it (I'd just have a nicer radio to be doing it wrong).
 
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DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
I'd call the FTM-100 the replacement for the FT-7900, not that it really matters. As built none of the amateur Yaesu radios will transmit out of band, e.g. they can receive GMRS but the firmware locks you out from trying to transmit. Yaesu has been building amateur radios for a really long time, zero worries about their quality.

If you're looking for radios that will do GMRS that aren't actually GMRS radios you should be looking for decommissioned business radios made by Motorola, Kenwood, Vertex-Standard, Icom, Hytera, GE-Ericsson. They are generally known as Part 90 radios and while not strictly legal for use on GMRS it's closer to it and in key technical areas easier to get working for it.
 
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dreadlocks

Well-known member
any name brand ham radio designed for US market will not work out of the box on GMRS, they will also be locked within their respective frequencies.. much like GMRS is to theirs.

my Kenwood required removing of an aforementioned resistor to unlock its transmit capabilities, known colloquially as a MARS/CAP modification.. not all radios support such modifications, but many do. IIRC MARS dont care if you use certified equipment as long as your permitted to operate on their freqs, most of the operators are using such mods.. it took me longer to take the case off and put it back on than it did to desolder the resistor, but I'm quite experienced with surface mount soldering.

I modified mine just to work w/my GMRS setup, it was not feasible to install two separate radios/antennas on my vehicle.. one was hard enough.. usually im working APRS on VHF and GMRS on UHF when out adventuring.
 

rnArmy

Adventurer
I'd call the FTM-100 the replacement for the FT-7900, not that it really matters. As built none of the amateur Yaesu radios will transmit out of band, e.g. they can receive GMRS but the firmware locks you out from trying to transmit. Yaesu has been building amateur radios for a really long time, zero worries about their quality.

If you're looking for radios that will do GMRS that aren't actually GMRS radios you should be looking for decommissioned business radios made by Motorola, Kenwood, Vertex-Standard, Icom, Hytera, GE-Ericsson. They are generally known as Part 90 radios and while not strictly legal for use on GMRS it's closer to it and in key technical areas easier to get working for it.
Interesting. I didn't see anything regarding the BTECH radio locking you out to transmitting on GMRS frequencies. Again; I'm learning here. I'm trying to keep it simple.

And the FTM-100DR is about $100 more than the Yaesu FTM-7250DR. And neither will let you transmit above 450 MHz (the GMRS frequencies). Both look like very nice radios which would be more than adequate for my simple needs.



I don't want to have three radios in my Jeep (CB, HAM, GMRS). I don't mind having two (a CB and HAM/GMRS). It would be nice if someone made a new not expensive simple dual-band (like the FTM-7250DR) that when shifting into GMRS frequencies would not go above the max legal output. Maybe now that the FCC has changed the rules regarding GMRS, someone will make such a radio. I'd buy one.
 
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dreadlocks

Well-known member
I don't want to have three radios in my Jeep (CB, HAM, GMRS). It would be nice if someone made a simple dual-band that when shifting into GMRS frequencies would not go above the max legal output.
FCC is way to stupid to allow anything useful like that.. the BTECH is not a FCC certified radio, its a grey market import.. its Legal for HAM Operation only because HAM's are allowed to build their own radios from the ground up and dont require certified devices.. its basically China exploiting a Loophole.. part of the new GMRS 2017 revisions was a directive to ban imports of any radio claiming GMRS capability that were not certified.. so they just call em HAM radios now, even through they have no transmitting restrictions pertaining to operating within HAM spectrums only.

Why do you need CB, HAM and GMRS capabilities? Just because it'd be cool? Actually use em? dont sound like you use much of anything right now except GMRS? just askin.
 
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rnArmy

Adventurer
Why do I need CB, HAM, and GMRS? I'm already super cool so that's not it.

On some group runs they use CB (been using CB for years), some group runs use HAM for communication, and now some groups (like the one I'm doing in October) are now specifying GMRS. I'm just trying to keep-up and be prepared. I'm not one to prattle on the radio - my main intended use is for group communication on what I call my adventures. I just want to set the desired frequency (be it CB, HAM, or GMRS), and be able to receive and transmit while being mobile.
 

dreadlocks

Well-known member
maybe a modular system you can swap out rigs? or just own it and go full blown radio shack?

Going for a wide open china import or a modifiable name brand ham sounds like it'd be worthwhile, just get your self a programming cable and double check all your work.. If your out in the field and have pre-programmed memory channels, its effectively as safe as a GMRS Mobile.. the burden is just on you to program it correctly.

Tones might be an issue on GMRS if you guys use em, there are charts on internet that map what various brands of radio's privacy tones frequencies are.. they simplify em for FRS/GMRS and make em appear as numbered subchannels.. such as: https://henryranch.net/radio-communication/frs-radio-privacy-tone-list/
 
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Recommended books for Overlanding

Gooseberry

Explorer
Why do I need CB, HAM, and GMRS? I'm already super cool so that's not it.

On some group runs they use CB (been using CB for years), some group runs use HAM for communication, and now some groups (like the one I'm doing in October) are now specifying GMRS. I'm just trying to keep-up and be prepared. I'm not one to prattle on the radio - my main intended use is for group communication on what I call my adventures. I just want to set the desired frequency (be it CB, HAM, or GMRS), and be able to receive and transmit while being mobile.
Not saying it’s right but an icom 7100 will do it all.


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Frdmskr

Adventurer
Interesting. I didn't see anything regarding the BTECH radio locking you out to transmitting on GMRS frequencies. Again; I'm learning here. I'm trying to keep it simple.

And the FTM-100 is about $100 more than the Yaesu FTM-7250DR. And neither will let you transmit above 450 MHz.



I don't want to have three radios in my Jeep (CB, HAM, GMRS). It would be nice if someone made a new not expensive simple dual-band (like the FTM-7250DR) that when shifting into GMRS frequencies would not go above the max legal output. Maybe now that the FCC has changed the rules regarding GMRS, someone will make such a radio. I'd buy one.
Look at the CS800 D. Wait for the new radios. These newest radios will be part 90 certified. They will cost $399 and will natively do GMRS. They are not part 95 because they do DMR and can transmit beyond the basic channels but, the part 90 certification has them modifying the transmitter to be clean.


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DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
I've been running a CS800D for a couple of years now, no complaints and has worked for me. The CS800 and CS801 are both Part 90 certified already. I think they still have a couple of the old non-Part 90 CS800D at the $199 blow out price.
 

Frdmskr

Adventurer
I've been running a CS800D for a couple of years now, no complaints and has worked for me. The CS800 and CS801 are both Part 90 certified already. I think they still have a couple of the old non-Part 90 CS800D at the $199 blow out price.
Thing is to be part 90 certified with the current 800d you need to do a mod which you buy or (suggested) let them do for you.


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DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
Thing is to be part 90 certified with the current 800d you need to do a mod which you buy or (suggested) let them do for you.
Yes indeed, Connect Systems will retrofit any existing CS800D to an FCC Part 90 CS800D with a new sticker for $149. So when you do the maths you'll find that $199 + $149 is somewhat less than $399... That's if you actually need Part 90 approval, which technically doesn't really help for GMRS compliance.
 

Frdmskr

Adventurer
Yes indeed, Connect Systems will retrofit any existing CS800D to an FCC Part 90 CS800D with a new sticker for $149. So when you do the maths you'll find that $199 + $149 is somewhat less than $399... That's if you actually need Part 90 approval, which technically doesn't really help for GMRS compliance.
Well it does and doesn’t. The law doesn’t state that but the FCC is getting more loose lipped about looking the other way for part 90 devices. I know some folks petitioning the just formalize this process but it hasn’t been finalized.

Getting the part 90 cert will go a long way to addressing the complaints about spurious emissions associated with Chinese radios. ConnectSystems already goes above and beyond to pre-identify bad rigs and with this program agin shows why they could teach Moto a thing or two about customer service.


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