Why no Ram 1500 Builds!

94toy22re

Observer
I rented a 1500 Classic this past week and I was really impressed, good power, very nice 8spd and I averaged 23mpg with a 2wd! Then I was shocked when they seem to be 10k less then a equally equipped F-150 or Silverado! With a 2wd V8 coming in around 25k and 4x4 under 30k why aren't more these being bought?
 

hodgexj1996

New member
I rented a 1500 Classic this past week and I was really impressed, good power, very nice 8spd and I averaged 23mpg with a 2wd! Then I was shocked when they seem to be 10k less then a equally equipped F-150 or Silverado! With a 2wd V8 coming in around 25k and 4x4 under 30k why aren't more these being bought?
Aftermarket isn't as big for the ram as others. Most guys with the rams are leveled with big rims and that's the market. There's a few of us on some other forums running pretty decent builds, but we don't have the support like other. Things like sliders and bumpers are almost non existent. You have to remember the 2500s get the glory for the ram lineup.

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PaxG56

New member
Older gas powered Durangos, Dakotas, 1500s had transmission issues (2500s too) but the newer ones are pretty stout if left at/near stock HP and not beat up. I ran a 98 Durango to 200k miles with a minor transmission repair and nothing else until it started burning oil and the flywheel let loose. I don't know the raw numbers but it sure seems like there are a lot more base F150s on the road which would appeal to anyone trying to get into a reasonably priced truck with good aftermarket support.
 

Shovel

Dreaming Ape
Must be a regional thing I saw a lot more 22" wheels on 4x4 pickups in the southeast than here in the western states.

I really don't know why they don't seem visibly popular with the travel crowd all I can think is people like to overload their vehicles so they go for 3/4 tons since a half ton and a 3/4 ton will burn the same amount of fuel on 35s with 1800lbs of junk in them.

Since I don't need to prove anything to anyone and I pack light I get pretty decent MPG in mine and it's still rated by the manufacturer to tow 9500 lbs in this configuration if I needed to.
 

SoTxAg06

Active member
It seems like ram guys prefer 22x14's and subs over 35's and airbags. Dunno.
Pretty sure that’s the trend for most trucks. Plenty on Facebook groups for Chevy that want a 6” lift wIth as wide of rim as they can fit. Almost none care about using their truck off the pavement.


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phsycle

Adventurer
Part of it was the truck in question was a 1500 Classic. It’s basically only the lower trims of the old 4th gen still being sold, at a significant price discount.
Regardless, the delta isn’t $10k. Find me one for low $20k’s. 4WD Crew Cab. Or high teens for an extended cab.
 

RAM5500 CAMPERTHING

OG Portal Member #183
Because the majority of the folks that have built up 1/2 tons for camping/exploring are realizing their payload capacity is surprisingly light so you're seeing more and more folks step up to 3/4 and 1 tons.

Myself included :)

It's funny. GVWR has always been a thing.

Seems folks in general only seemed to really start paying much mind to it in the last couple years.

Hence the lean towards 3/4 and 1 tons of recent. I cringe every time i see a Tacoma with a loaded FWC or similar on it, wayyyy over the limits. Response usually: "Nah, they told me i just needed airbags and E rated tires" ummmmm That's not how math works! hahaha

Browse the classifieds and you'll see Tacomas and half tons for sale over and over again, and usually have verbiage along the lines of "Moving up to....", etc..

You'll almost never see a 3/4 or 1 ton for sale with someone saying "I want a smaller truck" just saying :p

Half tons have their place in the world, but built up and loaded with gear isnt it.

That's my unsolicited .02
 
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jonathon

Active member
Modern V8 half tons get good fuel mileage and drive nice but that comes at the cost of low payload (1800lbs at the high end, as low as 1200lbs) and being equipped with P rated car tires. Especially with a V8 once you add an LT tire and a little weight you’re getting the same MPG as a 2500 without any of the benefits like a solid axle, higher clearance stock, better cooling, better brakes, stronger frame, etc.

I went from a stock P rated tire to a stock size E rated tire on my old Tacoma and dropped from 18 MPG to 15 MPG, loaded up for tent camping I saw as little as 12. I get 13 MPG combined out of my gas 2500 and it has a 3200lb pay load and rated to tow 16.5k.
 

Dalko43

Explorer
Because the majority of the folks that have built up 1/2 tons for camping/exploring are realizing their payloads are surprisingly light so you're seeing more and more folks step up to 3/4 and 1 tons.

Myself included :)

It's funny. GVWR has always been a thing.

Seems folks in general only seemed to really start paying much mind to it in the last couple years. Hence the lean towards 3/4 and 1 tons of recent. I cringe every time i see a Tacoma with a loaded FWC or similar on it, wayyyy over the limits. Response usually: "Nah, they told me i just needed airbags and E rated tires" ummmmm That's not how math works! hahaha

Browse the classifieds and you'll see Tacomas and half tons for sale over and over again, and usually have verbiage along the lines of "Moving up to....", etc..

You'll almost never see a 3/4 or 1 ton for sale with someone saying "I want a smaller truck" just saying :p

Half tons have their place in the world, but built up and loaded with gear isnt it.

That's my unsolicited .02
The fact is most truck owners (to include self-proclaimed overlanders) don't need the capability of a 3/4 or 1 ton. Most people aren't carrying around campers or even a payload that remotely approaches GVWR...heck most truck owners don't even use the beds.

The bigger trucks certainly have their advantages (payload, engine performance, towing, robust construction), but they cost more to buy and maintain...and they're a PITA to handle in suburban/city driving.

I'm in no way defending the overloaded Tacoma, of which you see plenty on social media...if you're carrying Xlbs of payload, buy a truck rated for that payload...plain and simple. It's cringe worthy.

But it's also cringe worthy when I see people pulling into an office parking lot with a 3/4 ton w/ an empty bed...I'd wager that 90% of those people use their trucks for commuting and nothing else.
 
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