Why buy a land cruiser?

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
It’s because it would ride like a dump truck, and have almost no axle articulation (like a LC70). Then they’d lose two big things they’re fighting the wrangler on.. ride quality and off road capability. It doesn’t need payload, it needs to wheel.
Yeah, the Wrangler was in their sights, not a LC.

We test drove one a couple weeks ago (our Black Diamond is scheduled the week of the 24th) It was a Sasquatch Outer Banks. For something on 35's it did have very nice road manners.

Payload/towing/etc... eh. It is going to be my wife's rural dd. For the heavy lifting I have two trucks.

I do think they might have some merit offering a payload package down the road once they get caught up on them though. As it is I think they are pretty tight on the GVW, they limit you on things, like roof rails and paint protection film on Sasquatch... stated because of GVW concerns.
 

Tex68w

Beach Bum
I guess I should have said what kind of payloads are they seeing but they seem very similar to a Cruiser albeit a few hundred pounds less on average.
 

jmodz

Active member
I’m curious what everyone thinks of the new sequoia. I think this might be an interesting successor for the new Land Cruiser. It’ll be longer than the LC but the adoption of the solid axle and the option of a factory locker are intriguing. I’m interested to find out whether the locker is optional on all trims or just the TRD Pro.
The downsides are price, since it’s estimated to start at around $50k. Although that’s cheap for a land cruiser (ish). The fact that the hybrid is standard isn’t a bad thing, and probably further justifies the price.
 

Tex68w

Beach Bum
I think it'll have a 5-10" longer wheelbase than the Land Cruiser which is and has been 112" since 1991 starting with the 80 Series. I also expect it to be slightly wider and obviously longer. So while it has a lot of what we wanted out of the next gen Cruiser, it'll still never be a Cruiser replacement, but it is the next best thing and our only option from Toyota stateside.

The TRD Pro should have the rear locker standard and the TRD Sport package should either have it as standard or as an option, hopefully. I am not sure about the other trims in regards to the locker. The trailer brake controller is a nice touch and much appreciated. I am not sure about the new hybrid but I did own the Lexus CT200h F-Sport with my ex some ten years back and it got 55-60 mpg on the highway without issue and worked well for us when fuel was damn near $5/gal. Hopefully they've found a way for the A/C to keep up in the hot summer months with the hybrid platform, that was a huge complaint with ours. The new Sequoia is the current frontrunner for my wife's next vehicle unless the new GX/4Runner just blows us away.
 

T-Willy

Well-known member
I’m curious what everyone thinks of the new sequoia. I think this might be an interesting successor for the new Land Cruiser. It’ll be longer than the LC but the adoption of the solid axle and the option of a factory locker are intriguing. I’m interested to find out whether the locker is optional on all trims or just the TRD Pro.
The downsides are price, since it’s estimated to start at around $50k. Although that’s cheap for a land cruiser (ish). The fact that the hybrid is standard isn’t a bad thing, and probably further justifies the price.
I think they did a great job. For me, it's too long and wide and sacrifices too much off-road nimbleness. But overall--the rigid axle, rear locker, four wheel drive systems, increased capacities and efficiency--I think they did a fantastic job making Sequoia far better suited to remote touring. The price is (unfortunately) on par with today's prices for such vehicles overall.
 

Ozark_Prowler

Active member
I always thought Toyota would've made a killing if they had given us the SWB FZJ70 series, maybe with the lighter duty axles to keep costs down.

Look at all the fully loaded Rubicons flying off the lots and tell me they wouldn't have sold here.
 

RoyJ

Adventurer
I always thought Toyota would've made a killing if they had given us the SWB FZJ70 series, maybe with the lighter duty axles to keep costs down.

Look at all the fully loaded Rubicons flying off the lots and tell me they wouldn't have sold here.
That's the problem, enthusiasts of bare bones tough trucks are far and few in between. And I doubt a 70 can pass a small overlap crash test...

Toyota likely looked at the take rates of fleet trucks, and concluded the only way to succeed is "g-wagenfy" a 70 series. But us enthusiasts would complain about the 500hp loaded to the brim luxury 70 series @ $125k.
 

Ozark_Prowler

Active member
That's the problem, enthusiasts of bare bones tough trucks are far and few in between. And I doubt a 70 can pass a small overlap crash test...

Toyota likely looked at the take rates of fleet trucks, and concluded the only way to succeed is "g-wagenfy" a 70 series. But us enthusiasts would complain about the 500hp loaded to the brim luxury 70 series @ $125k.
I think it's a misconception that every American wants a bougie, fully-loaded luxury behemoth.

Plenty of stripped-down work trucks around here, and look at the market for old basic Toyota pickups.
 

Tex68w

Beach Bum
I don't know if total luxury all the time is what most people here in the states want or if it's just advertising telling them that's what they want. I've had many high trim level and luxury vehicles in the past and my current truck is a stripped down work grade trim. I could have had a loaded out $85K truck like I've always bought in the past but that's not what I am after anymore.
 

nickw

Adventurer
I always thought Toyota would've made a killing if they had given us the SWB FZJ70 series, maybe with the lighter duty axles to keep costs down.

Look at all the fully loaded Rubicons flying off the lots and tell me they wouldn't have sold here.
I don't think they would have sold...they'd likely still be more expensive than a Jeep, just like the FJ40's were back in the day that didn't sell that well either....relative to Jeeps. Jeep just has that Americana nostalgia that a sim Toyota wouldn't have, I think it's unfortunate, but it is what it is.
 

Tex68w

Beach Bum
My father had a couple of very nice FJ40's in the past but they never did it for him, even with all of the Land Cruiser's I have owned he's never really bought into the nostalgia and appeal of Toyota's and Cruiser's and he owned a nice Tacoma and Tundra as well. When he bought his first FJ40 he was initially looking at CJ7's and CJ8's, the Jeep legacy was just more appealing to him as an American who grew up in the rural south, but I convinced him to try the Cruiser life out. I was a Jeep guy starting in my late teen's and through to my late 20's, I've owned a 1993 XJ, 1998 TJ, 1999 WJ, 2003 TJ, 2005 LJ, 2007 JKU and a 2012 JKU, and they were all fantastic off-road. The other thing they all had in common was parts breaking and crap warranty coverage, this hasn't changed as my father still gets the run around when it comes to issues on his new Gladiator Rubicon.

The majority of American's will always prefer domestics like Jeep and Ford, it's a cultural pride thing and that makes sense. Some of us have been bitten by the Toyota/Cruiser bug and it usually sticks for life but like others here have already noted, Toyota is losing it's grip on the longevity and reliability shtick as the domestics continue to improve and even surpass them at times and that's really all they have beyond resale value. I don't see the Ford Bronco or any topless 4WD SUV from any other make ever knocking Jeep off of it's pedestal.
 

Ozark_Prowler

Active member
I don't think they would have sold...they'd likely still be more expensive than a Jeep, just like the FJ40's were back in the day that didn't sell that well either....relative to Jeeps. Jeep just has that Americana nostalgia that a sim Toyota wouldn't have, I think it's unfortunate, but it is what it is.
We’ll they’re all over the place in Colombia and that market isn’t nearly as cashed up as the US.
 
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