Why aren't more tacoma owners up in arms about their trucks?

nickw

Adventurer
The whole wading depth thing: It is annoying if there are no official numbers. They give these numbers for Hiluxes and Landcruisers.
But still it is just a depth, and if you drive in fast enough you can still manage to break things or make enough of a wave for it to enter the intake.
I would never be confident to have a lot of water through the grill or even over the hood if it is not fitted with a snorkel.

Saying that you saw the oil pressure light flash at 10 degrees is ridiculous. Any normal car can get 10 degrees in a hilly area, also parked and starting/idling.
Everybody would notice that with any 2GR (and that are a lot of cars, also Lexus)



How was it a driver error?

Next to that, you could say that the 2GR and GR family of engines are a successor to the 3VZ and 5VZ as used alot in the 4runner. And the 5VZ is also built in Landcruisers as well as the 1GR in newer models.

So do they all potentially have these issues? When taking on steep angles?

I wouldn't think so, because it would be about 4Runners, Hiluxes, FJ Cruisers and Landcruiser (Prado). So I would think this is specific to the 2GR, or how it is applied in the Tacoma.
The VZ family were also not intended for offroad use I think but used for it.

The 1GR was definitely intended for offroad use because it has only been installed in 4x4's.
So there is a difference in 1GR and 2GR for this issue.
Yeah it is interesting they got away from the global engines in the latest Tacoma. To your point, the 1GR was used in overseas Land Cruisers, which to me always meant it was designed for, or at least held up to, a international working environment according to Toyota. The 2TR is another example...I had considered a Tacoma back in 2016 and was going to purchase the 2.7L because they sold it overseas.
 

austintaco

Explorer
I have seen your story and your link to your web page on FB, TW, and now here. The only thing we know for sure is that something happened. That’s it. If there is an issue, you are going the wrong way about getting something done about it. You lack credibility. On TW you said it was 20” of water, but on your web page you then say it was 9” or 10”. Which is it? It may not seem like a big deal to you, but it is to me, and any lawyer on either side of the table. If you really want to bring attention to an issue with the truck, get your data correct and stick to one story. Others have pointed out other inconsistencies and that’s likely why Toyota initially denied your warranty. That’s a speculation on my part. However, you have annoyed them enough that you got your engine replaced, so your tactic worked. Congrats.519037519037
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
I wouldn't warranty that. Yeah it's an off road stickered truck. But off road has never been covered by warranty. If you bring me your truck, and it's plastered with muddy sand underneath, I'll do what I can, bit if warranty isn't being generous, your paying $135/hr for my time.

Ford hasn't done a single Super Duty promo yet, that hasn't included complete abuse of the truck. That splashing into a mud pit at 30mph that they do during test drive events, isn't covered under warranty.

If my Ducati's engine lets go in the 150mph kink at Mid-Ohio, that's not covered under warranty. Despite the race promo's, track day test ride events, etc. etc.
 

Other Orb

New member
I should have destroyed two Toyota truck engines. 1) 1989 22RE pickup. Pebble penetrated oil filter while bombing down a gravel road. Drove from NAZ to SAZ. Didn't notice for two weeks while driving around Tucson in summer...with 0 oil pressure. Fixed filter, filled oil, drove another 100,000 miles to 240k.
2) 2007 Tacoma. Off road wood cutting, stick poked hole in radiator. Didn't notice. Drove 20 miles with fully-loaded wood trailer. Noticed. Replaced radiator. Drove another five years.

Yes. I abuse my trucks. I've never asked Toyota to warranty that abuse.

What I would never do is shut off a truck while on a 45 degree incline, leave truck sitting to allow hot oil to pool in weird places for 10 minutes and then restart it while still on the incline. That's what killed your engine. The published angles of ascent from other manufacturers assume you will keep the engine running through the ascent, not stop it partway through and allow the lubricant to drain away from the oil pump. Yes, it really sucks to destroy an expensive piece of machinery, but you couldn't reasonably expect Toyota to warranty the truck after you displace all the lubricant.

Would you expect your truck to be warrantied after driving on a seesaw or trying to stop a C-123 cargo plane? Those capabilities have been advertised too.
 

NudeLobster

Member
I wouldn't warranty that. Yeah it's an off road stickered truck. But off road has never been covered by warranty. If you bring me your truck, and it's plastered with muddy sand underneath, I'll do what I can, bit if warranty isn't being generous, your paying $135/hr for my time.

Ford hasn't done a single Super Duty promo yet, that hasn't included complete abuse of the truck. That splashing into a mud pit at 30mph that they do during test drive events, isn't covered under warranty.

If my Ducati's engine lets go in the 150mph kink at Mid-Ohio, that's not covered under warranty. Despite the race promo's, track day test ride events, etc. etc.

Not that it's applicable in this case, since he was in an "off road park", but here in AZ there are federal, state, and county roads that would make those cali "off road parks" look like a sunday stroll. Being a federal, state, and/or county road, named, mapped, and all, would mean technically, legally, not off-road; just on unimproved roads.
 

shade

Well-known member
I understand your engine was originally used in Camrys and may not have been designed with offroad use in mind.
Whatever happened to the OP's truck, Toyota did make some modifications to the engine for use in the Tacoma. When MY2016 specs were initially revealed, some complaints about the "Camry engine" were muted when someone posted diagrams of the redesigned oil pan used in the Tacoma. While the Camry version was relatively flat to keep the engine package compact, the Tacoma version was much deeper, presumably to allow for better oil pickup on uneven terrain.

It's interesting - but I think it's time for me to sign off on this forum. I don't think there's much more I can do in a room full of Toyota fanboys other than telling my story as accurately as possible, which I've done.
This is a discussion forum. No one treated you unfairly or rudely. Your comments have attracted scrutiny and some agreement, so your fanboy slight is weak. What sort of response did you expect? As was mentioned, this is nothing compared to the scrutiny any legal action would create. Like your truck, bidding us farewell over so little makes you come off as "high maintenance".

Also, why store the truck instead of driving or selling it?
 

sg1

Adventurer
Here a few theories about what may have caused the OPs oil problem.
I understand that the Taco got stuck on a fairly steep hill and that the engine was turned off for about 10 minutes. In this case the oil pump doesn't circulate the oil anymore and it flows back following gravity. This may cause 3 problems :
  1. Because of the steep angle it doesn't flow through the normal channels but instead gets into a cylinder through an open valve. I have seen this happening in overturned vehicles. Once the engine is started you have something like a hydrolock with oil instead of water.
  2. When the oil levels out in the oil pan and the crankcase it may be too high at the rear due to the steep angle of the engine and the last piston may hit the oil when going down. This can severely damage the piston or the crankshaft.
  3. The intake for the oil pump may be at a position where it runs dry if the oil levels out at a steep angle.
I have seen a few engines with lubrication problems like the one observed by the OP. But in these cases the trucks either fell on their side or where stalled at very steep angles, way steeper than the hill I have seen on the pictures.
 

shade

Well-known member
Here a few theories about what may have caused the OPs oil problem.
I understand that the Taco got stuck on a fairly steep hill and that the engine was turned off for about 10 minutes. In this case the oil pump doesn't circulate the oil anymore and it flows back following gravity. This may cause 3 problems :
  1. Because of the steep angle it doesn't flow through the normal channels but instead gets into a cylinder through an open valve. I have seen this happening in overturned vehicles. Once the engine is started you have something like a hydrolock with oil instead of water.
  2. When the oil levels out in the oil pan and the crankcase it may be too high at the rear due to the steep angle of the engine and the last piston may hit the oil when going down. This can severely damage the piston or the crankshaft.
  3. The intake for the oil pump may be at a position where it runs dry if the oil levels out at a steep angle.
I have seen a few engines with lubrication problems like the one observed by the OP. But in these cases the trucks either fell on their side or where stalled at very steep angles, way steeper than the hill I have seen on the pictures.
Makes sense. I've heard of other engines burning oil just like that on steep grades. If I remember correctly, the OP said he was getting a low oil light on a 10% grade. If true, that sounds more like a problem with that specific truck (bad sensor, not enough oil in the engine, etc.) than a design issue.

Examples for the OP: a 2012 Wrangler that burned oil on steep ascents (apparent manufacturing defect), and a 2013 Wrangler that began burning oil after several minutes of running on a steep incline (just the way things work).

I haven't kept up with the 3rd gen past the initial waves of exuberance and disappointment. It seems to be following the Kübler-Ross model of the automotive world. Has a level of acceptance been reached about it? My reasons for not wanting one have more to do with enjoying the absence of loan payments than the loss of 0.5L of displacement, or questionable claims of the 3rd gen's lack of seaworthiness.
 

phsycle

Adventurer
That sucks In may case Overlanded 90% off road pretty much entire states AZ,CO,UT,NM with ZERO problem . I put this with the transmission problems I must have a unicorn just FYI this is my 1st Toyota couldn't be happier with its off road performance.
Cool shot!
Yeah, “issues” are often over exaggerated and overblown on the net. Whether it be the Tacoma transmission issues, or spontaneous implosion of non-Toyota brands.
I really like the 3rd gens compared to the 1st or 2nd. If I had no kids, I’d still have mine.
 

Tex68w

Beach Bum
That sucks In may case Overlanded 90% off road pretty much entire states AZ,CO,UT,NM with ZERO problem . I put this with the transmission problems I must have a unicorn just FYI this is my 1st Toyota couldn't be happier with its off road performance.
Is that pic the Pole Creek crossing off of Stony Pass?
 
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