Why are other full size SUV's not used in overlanding/offroading as often as Forerunner/Landcruiser?

TwinDuro

Active member
My two cents on body with of domestic trucks.

I have a 2000 Suburban 1500, 1.25" wheel spacers up front, 2" wheel spacers in rear, 45mm offset wheels, 37x12.5" tires on 8.5" rims. Not stock by any means. I have not measured my exact width but I know for a fact that my Ford Raptor bumper was sticking out 1.5" past the tires on both sides. So that would give me approximately 77" width. from outside to outside of tires.

These extra 6" are significant when compared to stock trucks like Ranger, Colorado, Explorer, grand Cherokee, Wrangler. However as my truck is setup none of those narrower vehicles are capable of getting to remote places I go in their stock form, aside from a Rubicon.

Once you start modifying say a Jeep JK or TJ, such as lift (wider control arms), wheels (wider wheels, tires, greater offset) you are at the same width if not wider than my 77" wide Suburban. As you continue building the Jeep more you will break that 80" width and will not be able to make it on the trails a narrower full size truck can.

It all comes down to what you have, where you are planning to take it and how much you want to modify it. Taking an X90 on Potato Salad is just as wise as running a Stewart and Stevenson on Moab Rim trail. Use common scene and improve your vehicle for trails that make you happy.
Well said @CrazyDrei. That was something I failed to mentioned in my previous post so I’m happy you brought it up. Most vehicles aren’t left stock and the track width gets altered significantly, as you said. Your burb has really proved quite a few excellent points as you’ve built and used it... seems like a perfect rig for your needs.

I was talking about this very subject of domestic trucks compared to “X-perfect truck/SUV” with a buddy of mine and he stated “why wouldn’t they be durable and reliable? I wish you were able to see how these trucks were used by different government agencies for the last 50+ years. They’ve always been basically stock and beat to hell and back on a daily basis and have kept going. Forget about the negative Nancy’s and just go do it.”

... and that we will 😀👍
 

CrazyDrei

Space Monkey
Well said @CrazyDrei. That was something I failed to mentioned in my previous post so I’m happy you brought it up. Most vehicles aren’t left stock and the track width gets altered significantly, as you said. Your burb has really proved quite a few excellent points as you’ve built and used it... seems like a perfect rig for your needs.

I was talking about this very subject of domestic trucks compared to “X-perfect truck/SUV” with a buddy of mine and he stated “why wouldn’t they be durable and reliable? I wish you were able to see how these trucks were used by different government agencies for the last 50+ years. They’ve always been basically stock and beat to hell and back on a daily basis and have kept going. Forget about the negative Nancy’s and just go do it.”

... and that we will 😀👍
TwinDuro,

Absolutely. There is also one other factor too, as you mentioned my Sub is perfect for my needs, however that is only because I have a family of 5. When I was single I lived out of a 1995 Nissan Pathfinder for a couple years traveling all over North America including amonth in Alaska. Today the Pathfinder would be as useful as my current Sub would have been 15 years ago. Ultimately its the fine balance point between: needs, wants, and ca$h.

I still firmly believe in run what you brung. Spend more time exploring than building. Its more effective to figure out what you need when you don't have it that to figure out what you have that you don't need.
 

Ron B

Explorer
So, back to a part of this conversation that I haven't seen mentioned (or may have missed)... body width...
...this isn't a conversation about Nissans, it's about truck size. Here in the PNW (and other parts of North America), trails and logging roads can be tight and wider vehicles can be at a disadvantage.
Just went through this whole thread and enjoyed most of it. Definitely some good opinions and info to be heeded.

TwinDuro brings up a very important (and close to home) point - width. I am definitely in the minority as I wheel/play/camp/overland (sorry for the trigger word) in a hummer h1. Talk about a fat ass, the body is 6” wider than a suburban then add another 6 or 7” for the rock sliders. Luckily I am in the southwest and kind of a desert-rat so have a bit more room to play with. I have been toying with the idea of moving to something smaller that would make things easier and more trails accessible so truck width has definitely been on my mind.

Fat-ass aside the truck is a blast and really fun to wheel. It’s easy to work on, very stable and tons (literally) of payload. Sure it has it’s quirks and wheeling something as wide as a firetruck can be challenging but the damn thing makes me smile — which is the whole point.

It hurts my soul to see so many decked out yet perfectly clean and pristine looking vehicles cruising around town (of all makes) but perhaps if they realized how cool it was in the dirt they’d clog up the trails and we’d have to go even farther to get away.
 

ttengineer

Adventurer
I haven’t checked, but I doubt a 200 series is any less girthy than a Tahoe, Explorer, or any other full size american rig.

I’m sure there is a difference but I would be surprised if it’s over 6”.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Ron B

Explorer
I haven’t checked, but I doubt a 200 series is any less girthy than a Tahoe, Explorer, or any other full size american rig.

I’m sure there is a difference but I would be surprised if it’s over 6”.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
on the previous page TwinDuro made a nice list to compare...he has the 200 series on there as 78” which is an inch or two less than the Tahoe
 
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dirtdobberoffroad

Well-known member
Its all perception they are all ment to be parked by the soccer mom in the same size parking garages every where. My suburban is not near as big as people act like it is. I had a guy on a recent trip in a 100 series tell me there was no way my suburban would go down the same trail he could squeeze down. I pulled my sub from around the building and parked next to him and without getting a tape out you couldn't see the difference. I think it was like 1.5 to 2" on width and lenght wasn't that far off either. The suburban would turn sharper though.
 

Ron B

Explorer
Its all perception they are all ment to be parked by the soccer mom in the same size parking garages every where. My suburban is not near as big as people act like it is.
I know exactly what you mean. Mine is extremely wide at 92” but shorter than a Camry — with rear spare its still over a foot shorter than my colorado. We do pay the price on some twists and turns and narrow spots on trails though.
 

lilkia

Active member
Yep and after 500,000km the lancruiser owner needed a spinal fusion while the chevy owner had sore feet from walking a few miles .........once.

Helluva point 🤣


Somehow we have yet another Toyota fanclub thread in the Domestic section. Is owning a great and mighty Yota really that boring without internet connection?
How else would the rest of the world know they own one unless they tell the rest of the world every freeking time they can?
 

calicamper

Expedition Leader
My 07 Sequoia vs my 2019 Expedition they are nearly identical front to back. Expedition is wider but can pull a Uturn nearly as well as my Subaru. The Sequoia not so much
 

MTVR

Well-known member
Why is it whenever I see the word "overlanding" I picture some skinny jean wearing, bad IPA swilling, twisted mustache, round glasses, flannel wearing, Wheres Waldo looking ************?

If you want to get technical everytime you drive anywhere in anything you are "overlanding". You are driving over the land. It is a **************** word used to make losers feel like they belong to some secret club. Does it get used here to make the people that never really go on a true "expedition" feel like they truly belong? I mean I get that. Outside of the military I dont think Ive ever truly been on an "expedition". Ive spent weeks at a time both on foot and with a vehicle in the back country, living on what I or we carried with us. Some voluntary some voluntold, still, not what I would consider an "expedition".

Im not here because I see myself as some kind of great explorer needing to share my adventures. Im here to glean some good technical advice and maybe share some of the same from decades of wrenching, and building and what works and what breaks and what is plain overkill. Im also here to look at, some, cool trucks. Anymore its seems like a SEMA show with a bunch of overbuilt vehicles loaded with crap that will never get a good dusting let alone actually dirty offroad. BUT they have really cool "Overlander" stickers on them and apparently thats what counts.

I generally dont get bothered or even pay attention to trendy pop culture crap, but I would really like to ********** slap whomever coined the term "Overland". Not to mention it sounds like some half baked overly and unnecessarily dramatic Netflix made series full of Millenial angst with either witches or zombies. Probably zombies maybe a vampire. Maybe this can be the one where the nonbinary individual can be torn between loving a half rotted walking corpse or a water starved merperson while camping in the post Covid high desert? Or did they do that one already?
You could say that... ;)
 

Shovel

Dreaming Ape
How else would the rest of the world know they own one unless they tell the rest of the world every freeking time they can?
Lot of that going on in 4x4 jewelry forums, not only about Toyotas. Gotta make sure everyone knows about the materials you own.
 

MTVR

Well-known member
The real world, not Porsche paid fake news.

Did you even watch that video?

The $100K+ 760-horsepower supercharged Mustang GT500 with optional Sport Cup 2 track day tires on carbon fiber wheels and optional aero LOST to...a car that was not even a GT2RS...The Porsche in your video was a GT3RS, which has a normally-aspirated 3.8-liter 6-cylinder engine putting out almost 300 horsepower less.

In REALITY, the 700-horsepower twin-turbo GT2RS "Widowmaker" is significantly faster than either of those cars.
 
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