Which repair manual for 2014 JKU?

Jerry Ward

Adventurer
I need a little advice as to which repair/shop manual to purchase for my 2014 JKU. I am relocating to Alaska and the nature of my work will find me out in some pretty remote locations for 2-3 weeks at a time. While no stranger around a tool box, I'm not even close to a mechanic. I've noticed several manuals on the market, but am having a difficult time deciding which to purchase.

Ideal criteria would be:
-rugged/waterproof construction
-easy to read and understand instructions for the lay person
-detailed/clear diagrams and photos
-procedures easy to accomplish without access to an autoshop
-includes a list of the tools and sizes needed so I can compile a comprehensive tool kit w/out carrying around things I don't need

Any help is much appreciated. Thanks in advance...Jerry
 

Jerry Ward

Adventurer
Lots of people have viewed, but no response. I'm surprised nobody has any input. You guys can talk back and forth for weeks and make 100's of posts about a RTT, a fridge, or the shelves in the back of your Jeep but not offer any advice on a book to help you keep the vehicle running in the first place. I expected more from a group of folks whose whole hobby/lifestyle revolves around vehicle-based exploration and adventures...:)
 
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rubicon91

Explorer
Well I just read this hoping to see someone have advice. Since I am of no help I will still post to show you I did read :) best of luck and I hope you get the answers


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Yuccahead

Adventurer
I think nobody is answering because there are generally only 2 reasonably priced choices -- Haynes and Chilton. These don't come out until the vehicle is starting to come out of warranty. That is, they are not yet out for 2012+ Wranglers. That leaves you with the pricey factory manual. However, none of the options really satisfies any of your criteria. They all assume some level of knowledge and access to tools.

The Chiltons and Haynes have their relative strengths and weaknesses, are designed for amateur mechanics with some experience and are inexpensive enough to be not worth worrying about destroying. It's been a while since I've seen a factory repair manual (on CD) but I suppose you could store it on a rugged tablet or laptop but they are designed to be used by a trained factory mechanic with an extensive collection of tools and diagnostic equipment.

I think an inexpensive bluetooth ODBII reader an app like Torque would be a help here.
 

Lord Al Sorna

Harebrained Scheming
I haven't given this much thought yet, but glad you posted because now you have me considering this as well. In the past, I have found that by far the most complete service information comes straight from the manufacturer (vs. Haynes or Chilton type book). In our case, this is what you get:
https://www.techauthority.com/en-US/Pages/ItemDetail.aspx?SKU=81-370-14063-CD
This is not the ideal format for field service work and they are very proud of that little disk ($$). With that said, using this format you could compile a series of schematics/tech info on failures that are more likely (Electrical, Axle/Driveshaft, etc) and compile your own field book. You could even print it on waterproof paper...
 

Jerry Ward

Adventurer
I think nobody is answering because there are generally only 2 reasonably priced choices -- Haynes and Chilton. These don't come out until the vehicle is starting to come out of warranty. That is, they are not yet out for 2012+ Wranglers. That leaves you with the pricey factory manual. However, none of the options really satisfies any of your criteria. They all assume some level of knowledge and access to tools.

The Chiltons and Haynes have their relative strengths and weaknesses, are designed for amateur mechanics with some experience and are inexpensive enough to be not worth worrying about destroying. It's been a while since I've seen a factory repair manual (on CD) but I suppose you could store it on a rugged tablet or laptop but they are designed to be used by a trained factory mechanic with an extensive collection of tools and diagnostic equipment.

I think an inexpensive bluetooth ODBII reader an app like Torque would be a help here.
I was wondering about that as I've yet to find the Chilton and Haynes manual for my year. Didn't even consider the warranty issue. The factory service manuals are way over my head at the moment in the tech department. Plus, it's not a reality to have all the tools with me that the shop mechanics have available. Good info; thanks...
 

Jerry Ward

Adventurer
I haven't given this much thought yet, but glad you posted because now you have me considering this as well. In the past, I have found that by far the most complete service information comes straight from the manufacturer (vs. Haynes or Chilton type book). In our case, this is what you get:
https://www.techauthority.com/en-US/Pages/ItemDetail.aspx?SKU=81-370-14063-CD
This is not the ideal format for field service work and they are very proud of that little disk ($$). With that said, using this format you could compile a series of schematics/tech info on failures that are more likely (Electrical, Axle/Driveshaft, etc) and compile your own field book. You could even print it on waterproof paper...
That is a great idea!! Might just bite the bullet and order one of these gems and do just that. Laminated pages in a binder would be a good place to start compiling the critical info. Thanks for the link...

Since there does seem to be a lack of manuals designed with the backcountry mechanic in mind, this would be a great opportunity for someone in the know to author one. Money-making project and the whole offroad community could benefit from the effort.
 

Jurfie

Adventurer
I tried to get a shop manual thrown in when I bought my JKR, but no dice. The sales guy said "those are really expensive, you know", but I think he was just worried I'd do my own repairs rather than bring it back for service there.
 

Stanbiker

New member
You might be overthinking this anyway. When you are in SC, you probably won't be that far from other people. I'm not sure about SE, but it's not that big. Other than trail damage, if it breaks you will usually need parts if the repair isn't obvious enough to need a manual. (my opinion anyway, but I used to be a tech)

I carry basic hand tools, and some extra wire, tape, zip ties, etc. (and a big hammer!)
 

unkamonkey

Explorer
I only know about old Jeeps, an origional FSM is the only way to go. Haynes or Chiltons are best used as door stops.
 
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