Which new 1 Ton Diesel would you buy?

jaxyaks

Adventurer
As the title says, which new or newish 1 ton diesel (dually or otherwise) would you buy and why. Who is making the best diesel dually these days and who is making the best combo of drive train, and truck to go with it?
 

NOPEC

Member
Another question you might ask at the outset is about owning a 1 ton with IFS. Lots of folks here don't like it, I am on my 3rd HD GMC diesel and I haven't had a sniff of a problem with that componentry in 24 years, other stuff yes, but not with the IFS.
 

Todd n Natalie

Observer
I would suggest drive all 3 and see which one you like best. I think all 3 manufactures that are offering dually diesels all build pretty good trucks.

As stated above I think for this application independent front end or solid axle may not matter, I'm sure the terrain a dually diesel could handle will be fine with IFS.

Hell, guys are off roading Tacomas and F150's etc and they're IFS....
 
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Trixxx

Well-known member
I have a 2020 F250 Tremor with the 6.7L Diesel and 10 spd transmission. The 10 spd was new in 2020 and I love it compared to the old 6 speed. Smooth as butter. Also has 475 hp & 1050 lb torque.

There’s not a single other truck on the Full Size market I would trade this for. My buddy has a TRX I’ve driven pretty hard, and while sweet, it’s limited towing/payload capacity would be a deal breaker for me.
51EEF50C-BB16-4F42-8893-046051EB7782.jpeg
 

Porkchopexpress

Well-known member
As the title says, which new or newish 1 ton diesel (dually or otherwise) would you buy and why. Who is making the best diesel dually these days and who is making the best combo of drive train, and truck to go with it?
I guess you are asking generically but knowing how you will use it might make a difference?

My perception is that Ford has been the leader in selling light duty commercial diesels with Dodge second and GM a distant 3rd. Since commercial users abuse them and see the most broken trucks, their preference probably reflects reliability, durability and overall operating costs.

Maybe someone who deals with truck fleets can confirm or deny?
 

jaxyaks

Adventurer
I guess you are asking generically but knowing how you will use it might make a difference?

My perception is that Ford has been the leader in selling light duty commercial diesels with Dodge second and GM a distant 3rd. Since commercial users abuse them and see the most broken trucks, their preference probably reflects reliability, durability and overall operating costs.

Maybe someone who deals with truck fleets can confirm or deny?
Towing/ Hauling....HD truck stuff
 

billiebob

Well-known member
Maybe someone who deals with truck fleets can confirm or deny?
New diesels are far too unreliable regardless of the manufacturer. Have a buddy with a transit mix, gravel business he uses his truck hard often towing a tridem equipment trailer. In the past 6 years he's had Ford, Dodge, GMC diesels, none of them lasted a full year without breaking down. All powertrain issues. The GMC was in the shop for 6 weeks waiting for warranty parts. He now drives a Chevy with a gas engine, 2 years of trouble free driving and he's not missing the diesel torque. He'll never buy another diesel pickup. But he was several Mack gravel and cement trucks with real diesel engines.... all pre def.
 

Regcabguy

Expedition Leader
Another question you might ask at the outset is about owning a 1 ton with IFS. Lots of folks here don't like it, I am on my 3rd HD GMC diesel and I haven't had a sniff of a problem with that componentry in 24 years, other stuff yes, but not with the IFS.
The shop I use gets IFS trucks in frequently for aftermarket upgrades,ball joints,CV shafts etc. These are trucks that worked hard and frequently offroaded. Nothing tracks like an IFS.
 
I'm primarily a "diesel guy" all three of the Big Three are building a solid, reliable truck these days. I've got a number of friends who are full time diesel mechanics and shop owners. The Ford 6.7s are by far the most popular with them. Even if their race truck is a Cummins.


New diesels are far too unreliable regardless of the manufacturer. Have a buddy with a transit mix, gravel business he uses his truck hard often towing a tridem equipment trailer. In the past 6 years he's had Ford, Dodge, GMC diesels, none of them lasted a full year without breaking down. All powertrain issues. The GMC was in the shop for 6 weeks waiting for warranty parts. He now drives a Chevy with a gas engine, 2 years of trouble free driving and he's not missing the diesel torque. He'll never buy another diesel pickup. But he was several Mack gravel and cement trucks with real diesel engines.... all pre def.
Sounds like the issue isn't the trucks...
 

Highlander

The Good Shepherd
Is the fuel economy significant among the HD diesel vs HD gas?
The first time I saw a diesel cheaper than gas was a few ago in CT... never seen before.

Also why can't GM put their trucks on SA?
 

Regcabguy

Expedition Leader
Whatever you get buy the best factory sponsored service contract you can find. There's online discounted ones you can use as a bargaining chip.
 

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
I guess you are asking generically but knowing how you will use it might make a difference?

My perception is that Ford has been the leader in selling light duty commercial diesels with Dodge second and GM a distant 3rd. Since commercial users abuse them and see the most broken trucks, their preference probably reflects reliability, durability and overall operating costs.

Maybe someone who deals with truck fleets can confirm or deny?
Kind of a limited sample but it looks like a lot of fleets around me are swinging from Ford to Ram. John Deere service trucks, utility companies, city street department, county roads department etc. All used to be only Fords but seem to be slowly replaced with Rams.

I am really considering a 2500 Ram, 6.4 Hemi though. Hard pass on a rube goldberg diesel of any flavor.
 
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