Which land cruisers came factory with lockers?

lacofdfireman

Adventurer
I’m looking into maybe buying a Land Cruiser and someone was telling that they thought the 96 Land Cruiser came with factory lockers. I’m going to ya e a budget of probably less than $10k and hoping I can find something that I can lift and run 35’s with and have lockers. I don’t need to be able to do extreme rock crawling but want something that is pretty off road capable and be able to pull a small expedition style trailer. Trying to decide between this and a 4 door Jeep but for $10k I don’t think I’ll find much and I hear the Jeeps 3.8l Motor is a Dog.

Hoping someone here can maybe give me a good idea of years to look for and years to look out for. Any help is appreciated. I’m go8 g to spend the next few hours and days scanning these threads and trying to learn but if someone gave me a little jump start it might save me some time as I’m reading about different builds etc. Thanks.
 

70 140

New member
Optional on 60 series, 70 series, 80, 100, 200....

Based on your budget, your best bet is to watch for a high mileage 80 with lockers. Make sure it has the lockers -not just the locker switch!
 

bj70_guy

Adventurer
'93-'97 80 series could be had with factory lockers, agree with 70 140 that this would be your best bet.
 

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lacofdfireman

Adventurer
I hadn’t really searched for sell ads before posting this topic. I had a guy I work with a 97 that has lockers. He said he picked it up for $4500. So I figured I could pick one up around this price range also. His is pretty decent inside but paint was a little rough but that was about it. But I’m not finding anything even remotely close to that price range. I’m seeing 92-97’s with lockers on Craigslist goimg for 14-20k and don’t even look like they have been modified. And most have 200k plus miles. How many miles are these motors good for until a rebuild is typically needed? I may have to go a different route. Had no idea they were this expensive. I figured I could find a decent one under my price range with only left over. Not thinking that’s the case now.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
Don't be getting people's hopes up @70 140, this depends on where you live in the world. In the U.S. we only got them in 93-97 80 series and 98-99 100 series. Starting in 2000 Toyota only brought in trucks with tractional control, not lockers.

Toyota didn't officially bring 60 series with the factory cable lockers to North America and we never got a 70 series ever. Now they are out there and some have been imported, but it's not something you're like to just find on Craigslist. Spector used to be able to get Toyota cable lockers from 60 series, but big bucks.

You'll have the best luck finding an 80 series but unless there's some real desire for OEM lockers you're better off finding a nice truck first and foremost and putting in Air Lockers if you find you need them. Finding nice 80 series is hard enough as it is not to add a requirement for lockers. Heck even the 100 series are getting up in miles and wear that finding a unicorn 98-99 means you're competing with everyone from IH8MUD.
 
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NCFJ

Adventurer
Personally I would look for a clean rig with little to no rust and not worry about the factory lockers. The OEM lockers are long in the tooth on 80 series and older and often need costly repairs by this time if not maintained along the way. I would find a nice rig, drive it as is and if you must have lockers start by putting one in the rear axle first. Make sure that the model you do buy has a full float rear axle as some lockers are not available for the semi float axles.
 

RND1

Observer
The 95-97 80's have a cult like following with prices to match especially w factory lockers (as you're discovering). Bottom ends seem to be rather bullet proof, but head gaskets are weak link. Don't know about the 3.8L Jeep, but the 80 isn't known for it's power.

I would recommend you look for a '98 - '99 100 w factory rear locker. These are at the bottom of the price curve and you can probably find one for half the price of a similar mileage 80 w lockers. The V8 is very robust and has plenty of power (as long as you're not doing a ton of towing). You can probably find a nice one for $7500 which will leave you plenty for the lift and 35's.
 

toylandcruiser

Expedition Leader
The 95-97 80's have a cult like following with prices to match especially w factory lockers (as you're discovering). Bottom ends seem to be rather bullet proof, but head gaskets are weak link. Don't know about the 3.8L Jeep, but the 80 isn't known for it's power.

I would recommend you look for a '98 - '99 100 w factory rear locker. These are at the bottom of the price curve and you can probably find one for half the price of a similar mileage 80 w lockers. The V8 is very robust and has plenty of power (as long as you're not doing a ton of towing). You can probably find a nice one for $7500 which will leave you plenty for the lift and 35's.
The head gasket isn’t a weak link. It’s a regular maintenance item. Just like a timing belt would be.
 

redthies

Renaissance Redneck
Don't be getting people's hopes up. In the U.S. we only got them in 93-97 80 series and 98-99 100 series.

Toyota didn't officially bring 60 series with the factory cable lockers to North America and we never got a 70 series ever.
Dave, don’t be trashing people’s hopes either... We got BJ70s in Canada (last I checked Canada was part of North America) from 84-86. These were 3.4 B series diesels with H55 five speed manuals. A lot of them have succumbed to rust, but they are still around. I can’t say for certain what percentage were equipped with lockers though.

Depending on where you are shopping, 98-99 100 series can be found for way under $10,000. I’m just north of Seattle and in my area, that is a tough nut to crack, but in the southern US they seem to be going for a fair bit less than that with higher mileage. I tend to agree with you though, in that one is better to spend money on the cleanest and best maintained rig possible in either a 80 or 100 (mileage isn’t that big a factor with Land Cruisers), and then add ARBs at a later date.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
Dave, don’t be trashing people’s hopes either... We got BJ70s in Canada (last I checked Canada was part of North America) from 84-86. These were 3.4 B series diesels with H55 five speed manuals. A lot of them have succumbed to rust, but they are still around. I can’t say for certain what percentage were equipped with lockers though.

Depending on where you are shopping, 98-99 100 series can be found for way under $10,000. I’m just north of Seattle and in my area, that is a tough nut to crack, but in the southern US they seem to be going for a fair bit less than that with higher mileage. I tend to agree with you though, in that one is better to spend money on the cleanest and best maintained rig possible in either a 80 or 100 (mileage isn’t that big a factor with Land Cruisers), and then add ARBs at a later date.
Indeed. It's not impossible to get them, which is why I did admit some did get imported and added caveat that it depends on where you are. In the U.S. it's going to be a fairly astute and dedicated Cruiserhead who gets a 70 series and it's going to take some effort to find, register and maintain the beast. You guys up there did get some additional things we in the Land of the (not so)Free didn't. Still, in North America (which includes all 57 States as well the adjoining Canadian and Mexican territories) finding a factory locked 60 or 70 isn't exactly easy.
 

kletzenklueffer

Adventurer
I have a 93 FZJ80 with factory e-lockers. I have enjoyed them a lot, but have had a small issue with the front not engaging. Pulling the locker actuator off, I found that the worm gear grease had solidified into a soft plastic paste and was retarding the worm gear engagement which in turn engaged the locker. A half hour with some toothpicks and a 9 volt battery to run the worm gear and clean out the grease and then regrease with white lithium put it back to quick engagement. It was easy enough to do that I did the rear actuator as PM.

Having said that, I now also have a Tacoma with ARB's. The added benefit is the onboard air compressor that allows me to air up quickly.

If I were shopping for an 80 again, I'd factor in the cost of the ARB's and consider that as an equivalent option, provided the rear axle was still free floating. IIRC, the semi floating rear in 80;s was only for the 93-94 models as they were using up inventory from the 91-92 models, but I could be wrong about that.
 

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Westy

Adventurer
Find your local Land Cruiser chapter, I would go to your local Land Cruiser meet and introduce yourself. Drive and 80 or two, drive a 100 series. If you are concerned about the vehicle being a 'dog' like your reference to the Jeep, the 80 may not be for you. It's not known to be quick, after all it's a Land Cruiser. Add accesories and it gets even slower. The 100 series with the v8 would maybe be better and a lot easier to find. Lots of great information shared above.
 

RND1

Observer
The head gasket isn’t a weak link. It’s a regular maintenance item. Just like a timing belt would be.
Ah yes, the regularly scheduled head gasket replacement...

I'm a big fan of the 80 - would still like to add one to the fleet. When I get one, it will be a southern rust free rig with high miles and hopefully a fresh head gasket. :)
 
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