What would you add to New 4 runner?

shade

Well-known member
She really wanted the t r d pro but it did not come with a sunroof which was a deal breaker for her.

She got one with the sunroof and leather seats and all the gadgets she wanted and she got the big wheels but the dealer tried to get her to finance a stupid amount of money for a 2 inch lift
At least with Toyota, spending money for a better OEM suspension is a waste; a dealer sourced aftermarket suspension is often the same. It's not that hard to install yourself, especially on a new vehicle.
 

Dalko43

Explorer
She really wanted the t r d pro but it did not come with a sunroof which was a deal breaker for her.

She got one with the sunroof and leather seats and all the gadgets she wanted and she got the big wheels but the dealer tried to get her to finance a stupid amount of money for a 2 inch lift
There is a difference between the TRD Pro and Offroad (both of which have a rear locker, but the Pro is significantly more expensive).

The main reason to get either the Pro or Offroad is to get the factory e-locker. Added suspension bits and badging can be replicated via the aftermarket. If you want to go offroad, you'll want a locker. Air lockers cost a bit of money to buy and install and will add complexity...but that is a viable route.
 
My family loves our 5th gen 4runner. In addition to being a daily driver, we use it for off-roading, remote car camping (I refuse to use the O-word), and lengthy road trips. I have used a very simple, modest approach. I'm not really into the mega-lifted, zombie apocalypse mall crawler vibe with tons of stuff bolted to it that never gets used. If daily driving with all that is your thing, knock yourself out.

For less than $1k, I ordered and installed OME883s for the front, Wheeler T13s for the rear, Bilstein 5100s all the way around, poly sway bar bushings, and a set of Airlift bags for the rear to prevent sag/reverse rake when loaded down. This new suspension cured my nose-dive and floaty driving feeling. It now drives and feels like a truck.

Then, I put on a set of LT Nitto G2s in stock size mounted to SCS F5s. The LT version of these tires allow me to air down to 18-20psi offroad while only weighing 45 lbs each. That's only 6 lbs heavier than the stock Duelers. The 17" x 8.5"SCS F5s are 7lbs lighter per corner than my stock wheels. Since this is a daily driver, I didn't want it to be sluggish without a regear or lose too much fuel economy for no reason.

I added JBA UCAs to get a good high-caster alignment. No shimmy on the highway.

I've also invested in some other things like a Fiskars D-handle shovel (this should be your first off-road accessory!), ARB rear axle breather kit, LFD rugged rack bars, a Plano rifle case to hold tools, 3 x 1719 Plano trunks for all our camping gear, etc etc...

HERE is my build/adventure thread. I've been able to go anywhere I've wanted, and I've never encountered anything I couldn't crawl over or through with ATRAC. ATRAC is pretty amazing, especially when you give it some gas. I'm not saying I won't ever add a rear locker, but they really are overkill if you're just going to tool around national parks, forest service roads, or mild to intermediate trails.

Last thing: for new floormats, I have three words: Husky Husky Husky!
 
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Wallygator

Adventurer
Good tires in the stock size, sliders, and skid plates. Remember a stock 5th gen can and has run the Rubicon Trail. The things I mentioned will help protect your investment. Mentioned tires cuz the stock tires suck.
 

Boatbuilder79

Active member
There is a difference between the TRD Pro and Offroad (both of which have a rear locker, but the Pro is significantly more expensive).

The main reason to get either the Pro or Offroad is to get the factory e-locker. Added suspension bits and badging can be replicated via the aftermarket. If you want to go offroad, you'll want a locker. Air lockers cost a bit of money to buy and install and will add complexity...but that is a viable route.
Our thinking was that it would be better to get the cheaper car and add lockers than to buy the more expensive car and add a sunroof.

The arb system also appeals to me because I can put one in the front too.

Is the stock e locker better than the arb system?
 

Mr. Merk

Member
My buddy bought a 4RPro early last year. We immediately took it out and pushed it's limits, it surprised the hell out of us and then drove us home comfortably. He's got over 50k on it now and just switched from the Nittos to Ko2s. Pretty sure the only other mods are a 1up bike rack and a bunch of scratches. He's a wandering soul that never stops, has no address and has been more places in the past year than most of us will ever go.

He learned on a trip in his Fj62 to the most northern reaches of Alaska that you don't really need anything to go places and regretting pretty much every mod he wasted money on. I think I carry more overland gear in my lowered 2wd Sierra than he does.


 

Wallygator

Adventurer
Our thinking was that it would be better to get the cheaper car and add lockers than to buy the more expensive car and add a sunroof.

The arb system also appeals to me because I can put one in the front too.

Is the stock e locker better than the arb system?
No. ARB is air driven. Stock is an electric.
 

rpearce1475

New member
OP, I bought my 4Runner ('18 ORP) very lightly used, the previous owner had lifted it with spacers and put 285s on it. The suspension left a lot to be desired, between the nose dive and the body roll and the stiff feeling off road (likely due to the spacers). The 285s gave me great clearance but robbed me of power (stock gears) in the mountains. I've since replaced the stock suspension withBilstein 6112/5160 to give ~1" lift over stock (same height as the TRD Pro) and gone down to 265 tires. Ride is much improved with the suspension. With the tires, for everything except hard rock crawling trails, this is a fair superior set up for me (better power, etc.). I've also done a few interior upgrades to improve versatility but none that are really needed.
 
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KTempleton

Observer
We snagged a plain ole sr5 4x4 early 2018. Mainly for more room with a baby. I had all kinds of plans to upgrade and build. We ended up with a special needs kiddo so the financial situation has changed, It's still bone stock other than some Yakima cross bars for our tent. We have taken it to the Lone Star Jamboree (threw on some old AT's on 4th gen wheels for it). It handled the wet sloppy trails just fine running with heavily built rigs. We take it to the beach (deep sand), fishing and back forest roads all the time. I've never gotten bogged down. I do have some new Bilstein 6112's in the garage for it but haven't determined what I want to do in the rear yet. Figure I would do it closer to when tires are needed unless our loads get heavier. It's the wifes daily driver so no huge rush.

If doing trails. I would suggest some sliders. they will pay for themselves with the first hit. I haven't done them yet but I have't put it in a situation to need them.

Stock skids take a beating.

Drive it and go from there. they are pretty capable. Other than that, a way to air up and down will take you a long way.
 

Dalko43

Explorer
Our thinking was that it would be better to get the cheaper car and add lockers than to buy the more expensive car and add a sunroof.

The arb system also appeals to me because I can put one in the front too.

Is the stock e locker better than the arb system?
ARB air lockers have a solid reputation, though the fact that they run off air lines adds some complexity for install and maintenance.

I really don't know which one (ARB vs factory e-locker) is "stronger." I think they both work well. It's just a hell of a lot easier to buy the factory-installed e-locker and run with it without any worries. One major drawback to the factory e-locker is that the engagement time can be longer compared to the instantaneous response of air lockers.

They both work though.
 

Tex68w

Beach Bum
We have a 2018 Pro with a few mods. Those that I think are necessary are as follows:

1) Better tires, the factory Nitto's suck, plain and simple. We run a 275 BFG KO2 AT, while I wish they were bigger they provide plenty of clearance and have kept my fuel economy respectable.

2) Sliders, pick your favorite, they are necessary on this vehicle and will pay dividends when off-road when they save your rockers and doors from nasty dents.

3) All weather floor mats. Most suggest Weathertech but IMHO the Husky mats are better in every way.

That's all you need to enjoy yourself off-road, as others have already said, these 5th Gens are extremely capable in stock form.

Other mods I suggest:

1) Air compressor for airing up your tires and running tools. I prefer the ARB twin but the single does well with tires under 33" tall. Viair and a few other portable options like Power Tank are valid options as well.

2) Roof rack or upgraded cross bars. These aren't just to look cool, they provide a secure platform for carrying heavier loads up top in order to free up space inside. They are great for mounting RTT's, traction boards, fuel cans, jacks, pelican cases, lights, etc. I run an older Prinsu but there are better options out there like FrontRunner, Rhino, and LFD.

3) Skid plates. I have the TRD front skid plate that came on our Pro and I have already damaged it on a very mild trail so it doesn't take much to mangle the factory stuff. There are a ton of options out there, I like the ones from RCI, CBI, and Hefty. Make sure you get the gas tank skid as well when you invest in these.

4) Upgraded fog lights, head lights or added auxiliary lights. The factory headlights on these vehicles blow hard. So far we have gotten by with the Baja Designs fog light kit, but we could use more light further out when off-road.

Beyond this you are really getting into mods with diminishing returns. We all want bumpers, winches, front lockers, coil overs, long travel, dual batteries and battery management systems, fridges, sleep systems, etc. but the fact of the matter is that most of us will never use that stuff enough to justify it. That said, it's fun to mod vehicles and if you need it then you need it and you can knock yourself out going down the worm hole of mods. Best of luck with your build and don't worry about the haters and naysayers, it's your vehicle and your money so spend it how you see fit.
 

Boatbuilder79

Active member
We snagged a plain ole sr5 4x4 early 2018. Mainly for more room with a baby. I had all kinds of plans to upgrade and build. We ended up with a special needs kiddo so the financial situation has changed, It's still bone stock other than some Yakima cross bars for our tent. We have taken it to the Lone Star Jamboree (threw on some old AT's on 4th gen wheels for it). It handled the wet sloppy trails just fine running with heavily built rigs. We take it to the beach (deep sand), fishing and back forest roads all the time. I've never gotten bogged down. I do have some new Bilstein 6112's in the garage for it but haven't determined what I want to do in the rear yet. Figure I would do it closer to when tires are needed unless our loads get heavier. It's the wifes daily driver so no huge rush.

If doing trails. I would suggest some sliders. they will pay for themselves with the first hit. I haven't done them yet but I have't put it in a situation to need them.

Stock skids take a beating.

Drive it and go from there. they are pretty capable. Other than that, a way to air up and down will take you a long way.
Which cross bars did you get? Round or the foil shape?

What system did you use to attach them to the rails?
 

KTempleton

Observer
Which cross bars did you get? Round or the foil shape?

What system did you use to attach them to the rails?
We just have a set that we moved from another vehicle. They are round with the heavy duty rubber straps that you tighten with an allen key. then with a wind deflector up front. I would like them to be wider but they work for the tent great. My buddy has the same Thule version in the with the square tubes just wider. both work great for their intended use
 

Chris21700

Observer
GL with your build!! Do it right the first time and save yourself a ton of money in the long run. Like others have said, seat time and miles are going to be the best indicator of what is going to benefit you most. Most importantly, have fun!! And be safe. :)
 
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