what wood to install between frame and deck?

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
One more time...

we are not talking about the decking.

We are talking about the material installed between the flatbed frame and the truck chassis.
 

glennm01

Member
Maybe a dumb question, but I'm curious to know what exactly is the purpose of this wood (or other suitable material) between the chassis and subframe? Why is this preferable to just having the subframe lay directly on the chassis frame (i.e. nothing in between)?
 

dlh62c

Explorer
Maybe a dumb question, but I'm curious to know what exactly is the purpose of this wood (or other suitable material) between the chassis and subframe? Why is this preferable to just having the subframe lay directly on the chassis frame (i.e. nothing in between)?
Next time a truck with a cargo body pulls up along side of you, glance over and you'll see material sandwitched between the cargo body's subframe and the truck's frame rails. The industry standard used to be oak, not sure what it is today.
morgan-dry-freight-gold-star-09.jpg
 

glennm01

Member
Thanks, Verkstad. Reason I ask, I'm having a flatbed with spring-mounted subframe installed on my FG by a commercial truck body builder, and they're of the mind that the wood is unnecessary. The Mitsubishi bodybuilder's guide makes no mention of it either, and clearly depicts the subframe laying directly on the frame rail.
 

gait

Explorer
I have sprung mount. No wood. Just a bit of polyurethane incorporated in the spring mounts so they don't make too big a clunk if they ever have to function. Even that is not absolutely necessary.

I generally associate wood insert along the length of the chassis with u-bolt attachment of sub-frame to chassis where movement between sub-frame and chassis can occur.
 

skippythedog

Observer
Why wood?.....Why not polyurethane pads...which you can get in any density your want...I used inch thick dense rubber for my dumping deck....
 

Alloy

Well-known member
Mounting a work deck on my fe180 and wondering what kind of wood to use?

Oak?

Fir?
I've seen both hard and soft wood used. Hard wood wears while softwood compresses. All of which is good as long as the bolts are snug.

For offroad I've seen (but have no experince with) 2, 3, 4 and 6 point mounting.
 

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Victorian

Approved Vendor : Total Composites
ONLY commercial trucks can get away with a stiff non articulating subframe. With those, it doesn't matter as much if there is some movement in the body. Vehicles that go off-road and experience a lot of twisting DO NEED an articulating subframe. This prevents cabinetry, doors and windows being misaligned . It also prevents the body from being torn apart... These frames ARE NOT mentioned in any truck body builders guide (other than Unimog). You will need to do your own research or hire someone that has experience designing and building them.
Btw, it's still common to use any type of hardwood between the main frame and subframe. Mainly to maintain the wheel travel clearances. We build our commercial truck subframe tall enough for each vehicle. Therefore we only need a 1/2 rubber layer to prevent metal on metal contact.
 

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