What LC would you suggest?

Life_in_4Lo

Explorer
when someone is asking "which Land Cruiser", why recommend a Sequoia?

The 100 build quality and durability are worth the extra money. The 100 fits the OP's requirements perfectly and he can become part of the Land Cruiser community! :)

check out 100 series tech on ih8mud.com for all the info on LC's you will need.
 

rionorte

Member
If you're new to LCs, get the most maintained and reliable one you can find. Getting a poor choice up to wheeling snuff can take money and time from taking it and enjoying the outdoors.

Since I won't see or do the 10% of what the 80 is capable of, I would choose the 2000+ 100 series if I had do it over. Newer and has AC vents for the 2nd and 3rd row.



I've considered the Sequoia, I really like the looks of it but it just seems too big. To much the size of an Ford expedition or something. I think the LC 80 is much more reasonable in size, although I don't know for sure.

Also does a Seq. have factory lockers?

The third row wouldn't be for adults, just extra kids if nesc. and if no extra kids, storage.

I've been seeing a lot of 80's for less than $7000, this would really be a spare vehicle per say, one that we could use for long trips and be stock off-road worthy.

The Seq.'s are very $$$ from what I can see.

Thanks.
 

UCBerzerkeley

Observer
Yah, I think it is actually a fairly clear cut decision based on both your wants and needs.

100 series - reliable, less mileage, comfier, less capable (IFS/etc)

80 series - ultra reliable, more mileage, less comfy (though still fine), ultra capable (especially with lockers)

I have an 80, I'm also 23. I found one with 70k miles and dropped more than I was prepared, but am thrilled nonetheless.
 

Brian894x4

Explorer
when someone is asking "which Land Cruiser", why recommend a Sequoia?

The 100 build quality and durability are worth the extra money. The 100 fits the OP's requirements perfectly and he can become part of the Land Cruiser community! :)

check out 100 series tech on ih8mud.com for all the info on LC's you will need.
I only suggested it because it seems like he was more interested in passenger capability in a moderately reliable vehicle that was still 4WD capable. I'd much rather steer him towards a Sequoia than a Ford or GM whatever.

I think if your budget is in the $7000 range or at least under $10K, you can't go wrong with a nice 80 series. But read up on them. There's a few things you need to know in terms of maintainence that you may end up tackling with a rig in the 100-150K mileage range, which you're most likely to find these days. Front end will likely need rebuild, PHH, potential headgasket issues, some cooling maintainence might be needed, etc. Not a big deal at all for anyone who's mechanically apt and once fixed, the rig will be golden for years (or decades) to come and another 100,000-200,000 miles.

I don't know much about the 100 series, but they "seem" to a good "fire and forget" vehicle. I don't get the impression there's a ton of things to do or worry about with them. Just change the oils, basic maintainence, etc. But perhaps a 100 owner could elaborate if there's more to it.

I love my 80 and wouldn't trade it for anything for what I use it for. But I do lust after a 100 series for a daily driver and a highway cruiser. And for what this person appears to be looking for, I'd probably steer him towards an older 100 series that's close to his price range.
 

hikingff77

Adventurer
Thanks for all the replies.

Here's the thing. I had a Wrangler in 1998 and wheeled the thing every chance I got as best I could stock. The thing worked awesome. Always been a huge Jeep Wrangler guy, but with a new baby, nine year old, two medium dogs and a possible friend here or there the Wrangler just won't do. Well it would do if I could afford a JK Unlimited, but let's get serious.

What it comes down to is I want a less expensive vehicle to buy, as it will be a third vehicle and not a DD, so if it breaks or need repairs at home, I'll just fix it as I can and it won't hinder me getting to work, etc.

The third row I want as if nesc. option. I'm sure it's big enough for kids, unless I'm wrong but it'd be stupid if anyone put a third row in and kids couldn't even sit in it.

I want something that I could wheel moderately, in this area it's snow and mud and forest roads. Nothing overly complicated. I like the solid front axle cause I know how much stronger they are than IFS.

I really want something reliable, durable, low initial cost (don't care 'bout mileage) and something that handles pretty well on the street.

With the highway speed I've heard a lot of comments about it being slow, is that true on the highway or just around town?

Thanks again.
 

Life_in_4Lo

Explorer
If you basically want a bigger Jeep, the closest wagon is the 80. It's not fast but it does ok. It's all personal perspective.
 

luk4mud

Explorer
Former (very recent) Wrangler owner here. I made the difficult decision to sell my baby in August, for the very same reasons you are considering now.

My Wrangler was, by most standards, well built- not Johnson Valley/ Hammers kind of built, but black diamond trails in the Sierras kind of built. It was capable well behind the driver's abilities/ pucker factor.

My new- to- me 1997 FZJ 80 with a 2.5 lift and 34" tires will get me 90% of the places that my Wrangler would. In giving up that 10% capability, I gained:
-Comfort. The Wrangler short wb was killing me on the highway. Getting to and from a trail was painful. The noise level is much lower- I can hear the stereo!
-Space. Obviously. All 3 kids, the wife, dogs can all come now.
Reliability. I used to look for aftermarket parts for replacements on the Jeep. Now I seek out OEM for the Toyota.
-Novelty. Still don't see many 80's on the trails. I'm the only one in my off road club.
-Hot meals. My manifold cooker is the schiznitz. Trying a new pork tenderloin recipe this weekend. Cooked 10 dogs, 2 burritos, some bbq beef and veggies on the trail a couple of weeks ago for the crew.
-Safety. My wife prefers to drive the 80 around town now. With a beefy ARB front and custom rear bumper, this thing is a tank.

HTH
 

freshspecbluegt

Adventurer
I don't really know what people want when they say it is slow. My 80 will cruise at 70-80 on the freeway all day. I'll admit you have to plan passes on a two lane road carefully but most of the time its not an issue. For most hills and passes if you can turn off the overdrive hit the power button and it will take on most grades with ease, given your not trying to push 35 inch+ tires with stock gears over a 10% grade at 10,000 ft.

Ross
 

ShottsCruisers

Explorer
I don't really know what people want when they say it is slow. My 80 will cruise at 70-80 on the freeway all day. I'll admit you have to plan passes on a two lane road carefully but most of the time its not an issue. For most hills and passes if you can turn off the overdrive hit the power button and it will take on most grades with ease, given your not trying to push 35 inch+ tires with stock gears over a 10% grade at 10,000 ft.

Ross
I think the comments come because relatively speaking, the 80-series are slugs compared to other SUV's of their time period. The straight 6 motor (while very reliable) is far too underpowered for such a heavy vehicle. Then add the wheeling gear, all the steel, and larger tires and it's powertrain, braking system, and steering system are beyond the designed performance limits.

*Acceleration is very poor.
*Braking distances increase significantly with larger tires.
*Steering-wise it can be near impossible to turn while climbing up larger ledges and into rocks...especially if a locker(s) is on.

All of the above was tremendously improved in the next (100) Series.

*The V8 engine is far more up to the task of a loaded truck.

*Braking reserve is more than adequate for even 35-inch tires. Much shorter stops and with better control. You also have 100% braking if the motor dies for some reason.

*Steering system is HUGELY improved and has so much reserve that turning up or onto anything is cake even if triple-locked. Rack life is shortened however if you put the thing through these demands often.
 

ShottsCruisers

Explorer
*Acceleration is very poor.
By the way, I will say that my second 80 is more tolerable. I added 4.88 gears when going to 35" tires. This makes for an increase in gearing/power of about 8%. So the RPM's are up, the gas mileage sucks at about 10MPG, though it does much better off the line and up and down hills.

My buddy with 4.88's and a TRD S/C beats my 100 off the line to about 20MPH. From there we're neck and neck until about 60 where I pull away. My 100 however is at a huge disadvantage...35's and factory gearing, or about a 12% power loss. (To his 8% power gain and S/C). Also...when you step on it...his engine roars and is rough and feels like it's coming apart. Mine is soooooooooth as silk.
 

hikingff77

Adventurer
Exactly what I was looking for.

Just one complaint, you post all this nice text and post no pictures? Ouch. :victory:

Former (very recent) Wrangler owner here. I made the difficult decision to sell my baby in August, for the very same reasons you are considering now.

My Wrangler was, by most standards, well built- not Johnson Valley/ Hammers kind of built, but black diamond trails in the Sierras kind of built. It was capable well behind the driver's abilities/ pucker factor.

My new- to- me 1997 FZJ 80 with a 2.5 lift and 34" tires will get me 90% of the places that my Wrangler would. In giving up that 10% capability, I gained:
-Comfort. The Wrangler short wb was killing me on the highway. Getting to and from a trail was painful. The noise level is much lower- I can hear the stereo!
-Space. Obviously. All 3 kids, the wife, dogs can all come now.
Reliability. I used to look for aftermarket parts for replacements on the Jeep. Now I seek out OEM for the Toyota.
-Novelty. Still don't see many 80's on the trails. I'm the only one in my off road club.
-Hot meals. My manifold cooker is the schiznitz. Trying a new pork tenderloin recipe this weekend. Cooked 10 dogs, 2 burritos, some bbq beef and veggies on the trail a couple of weeks ago for the crew.
-Safety. My wife prefers to drive the 80 around town now. With a beefy ARB front and custom rear bumper, this thing is a tank.

HTH
 
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