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What are you using for a coffee maker and coffee brand when camping/overlanding?

Chris Boyd

Explorer
Camping (or horse competitions in this photo):



JetBoil for the water, snowPeak pour-over into the drinking mug of the day. Here a snowPeak titanium, but sometimes a travel mug. Have a porlex grinder and usually grind up either Starbucks Sumatra or something I can find locally.

All packs into the single snow peak tote and goes into the drawer.
 

Gary K

New member
Green coffee beans (around $6/lb from Sweet Maria's) roasted in a Whirlypop stovetop corn popper at home (popper costs $25-30 and last for years) no more than 5 days before, if possible

Stainless steel canister, small, bought many years ago, to store the roasted beans

German-made Zassenhaus brass Turkish handmill grinder, paid around $50 many years ago -- more expensive now -- used many many times and should last a lifetime

Melitta No. 2 cone, paid around $5 and lasts forever (I normally avoid plastic but camping applications demand a temporary exception -- use ceramic cone at home)

No. 2 brown paper filters, Trader Joe's, $3 for pack of 100

Japanese stainless steel kettle, paid around $60 a few years ago and should last forever

Any stove

Titanium Snow Peak double-wall mug, 15 oz, currently $50 but bought using REI member coupon, to replace a $5 stainless steel double wall 14 oz mug whose handle snapped off

Stainless steel tea cup cover, bought from Hong Kong on ebay for $4 delivered

All of the above sounds like a lot but it's not that much equipment and does not take up much space. The process is simple: heat water to boiling, grind scoop of beans (fine), pour boiling water through filter cone into mug to preheat mug and wash filter, dump that, pour water over grounds. Just a little more complicated than instant. No electricity needed. Use the tea cup cover to keep the coffee hot on cool mornings.
 

TwinStick

Explorer
I take a container of French vanilla coffee & a container of Chocolate coffee & mix them together. It is awesome. I have converted many a "I don't drink nothing but straight coffee" people. When we go camping, the smell itself while brewing in our stove top percolator coffee pot outside, has brought many people into our site asking what is that heavenly smell. LOL
 

General Automag

Adventurer
Coffee options: Time and number of people drinking

I write this for all of my fellow coffee lovers out there. I've tried many, many different ways to make coffee while camping, hunting, and adventuring on the road. In coming up with a system, I realized that there are several factors to be considered that will affect your decision.

1) How many people will be drinking your coffee, and how many cups will each person drink?
2) How much time do you have to make and enjoy your coffee?
3) How much space do you have for your coffee making gear? (backpacking or vehicle camping?)


***My favorite option is a Nissan stainless steel coffee (French) press http://www.thermosonline.com/products/NCI1000.htm
Heat your water fast with a water boiler stove such as a Jetboil or MSR Reactor (they both work well - the MSR Reactor heats water a bit faster), and just pour it in. Depending on how long you steep your coffee, you can have very good coffee in 5 minutes or so total time.
The Nissan french press is very durable, easy to clean, and makes 1 quart or 1 liter of coffee which is just over 4 cups of coffee (I haven't seen a better coffee press to date. It's simple, made out of metal, and doesn't have any pieces and small parts to break)


** When we have a larger group and ample time, I like a simple old-school perculator. No one tells you how long to perculate, but you will figure it out based on how rich you prefer your coffee. It takes longer but makes more coffee if you get a larger size.
Cleanup is a little more than a coffee press, but it's not a big deal if you have water available. Because it takes longer, you get to smell the aroma a little longer.

* For one person, or two people if you're in a pinch for space or weight, I like the Jetboil with the coffee press option.
It heats water very fast and is easy to make a good cup or two of coffee. The downside is that it makes a smaller amount of coffee.

Now for the cream and sugar and other trimmings:
We prefer grinding coffee beans right before we brew our coffee. We have one of the GSI hand grinders like someone mentioned in a post above, but it doesn't grind coffee fast. It works fine though. Sometimes we'll pre-measure our beans and grind them before our trip and put each grind in separate sandwich-sized ziplock bags. I have used smaller Tupperware type containers but have found that the ziplock bags pack and store better.

Sugar and sweeteners:
I prefer honey, but I like the individual sugar packs as they are cheap and easy to pack. We like cinnamon too, so we pack a small spice shaker.

For 1/2 & 1/2 or cream:
We prefer the real thing, so when we pack a cooler or fridge freezer, I'll buy the 1/2-pint size small carton of 1/2 and 1/2. If space is an issue or we don't have refrigeration, I like the individual small cup type packs. Most people will use 2 or 3 or these per cup of coffee. As a last option for creamer, I'll pack the Carnation brand powdered creamer in smaller sized ziplock bags. The Carnation brand tends to taste better than the generic brands.

Believe it or not, I have a separate dry bag labeled just for "COFFEE" and pack what we need based on where we're going, for how long, and for how many people.
FYI, I haven't found better thermoses than the Nissan brand ones. I don't use thermoses much anymore, but the Nissan ones are great. I've had some for almost 20 years now and they still function as well as when they were now, albeit with a few dings and scratches.

PS We prefer Starbucks whole bean coffee in 1-pound packages. We used to buy their coffee for our customers and employees, and for years I have been buying their coffee at 30%-40% off their retail price. This means we're drinking "gourmet" coffee for the same or lesser price than for private label or no-name brand beans you buy at your local grocery store. We've tried all of their coffee save for a few seasonal blends and really do like their coffee, especially their dark roasts. We usually buy between 20-30 pounds at one time, but since they 1-pound bags are vacuum packed, shelf life isn't an issue. We love the huge discount, and so do the Starbucks store managers because they like the increase in sale numbers especially towards the end of the month.
 

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CSG

Explorer
I've posted in the past, here and on Mud, about what we do for coffee. Melitta single cup filter holder, #4 filter, SF Bay French roast whole beans (but ground before the trip), into a 20 or 30 oz Yeti type mug. No mess, no fuss, easy clean-up. Water is heated on whatever single burner stove we have with us (usually a butane burner).

Here's a recent set-up in Bryce Canyon. I'd camped out in the Dixie NF and drove in early. Made coffee in the parking lot of one of the overlooks. Shortly after this photo and I was pouring water, I heard some murmuring behind me and looked to see about a half dozen Japanese tourists watching and checking out my van. The little soft cooler is where I keep the ground coffee, filters, cone, and mug. And I think there's an iPad in the front pocket. The burner stows under the van's sink and the kettle goes into the microwave. Even though the van has a two-burner stove and on board water, I almost never use either as all I ever do with a stove is heat water and it's easier to carry the 4 gallon Reliance container in the sink and put it on the stove when I need water. No filling, sanitizing, winterizing the main water tank. I like simplicity.

 
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Hobiecat

Observer
Costco coffee made with a Melitta pour over and poudered cream. We boil the water on the Coleman stove.

I recently discovered Cafe Du Monde w/chicory”, while we were in Louisiana, and it happens to be the only coffee that I enjoy drinking black.
 
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vartz04

Adventurer
Haven’t done much camping lately but I use my jetboil at work. Tim Horton’s grounds and I just make coffee on the tailgate. Usually one or two of the guys will come by asking for a refill too
 

verdesard0g

Search and Rescue first responder
Seattle's Best #5, 16 cup percolator for the whole campsite or french press for just me. Whole beans ground before the trip. There is usually some Baileys .......
 

cactusjk

Explorer
What brand kettle is that?
In LGRT's breakfast post coffee was mentioned later in the thread, but I did not want to clog it up since the thread was mainly about food.
So what are you using for making coffee when camping, and what kind?

I use to use a French press when camping, as I also used one at home too.
But they are kind of hard to clean, and use a lot of water.
I have seen the pour overs that are out now that are based on a very old concept of the Melitta pour overs that my parents were using back in the 70s.
I have not tried one.

Last year there was a HUGE thread over on IH8MUD's camping section about camp coffee, and I kept seeing the Aeropress coffee maker popping up.
I decided to buy one last winter, and I liked it so much I bought a second one just to keep in the chuckbox.
There is a little mess leftover, but pretty easy to clean by rinsing with the leftover water from the Hario pot I use to boil the water with.
Yes, I have two of them too, one for home, one for the chuckbox :D
You can see it on the right burner on my stove.

Now as far as coffee goes, I got flipped crap on another site I will not mention, but I think you know the site.
All they do in the thread there is cut down others to make themselves seem better than others.
They even cut down my Outdoor X4 mug :D
I happen to like the Overland Coffee Company "Expedition blend" coffee as seen in the picture below.
It has a bit of chocolate and cherry in it, and it suits me fine.
They also cut down another brand I use at home, but I did not mention, they just talked about it.
That is Black Rifle Coffee, and at home and work I use a Keurig coffee maker, and I use Black Rifle's CAF K-Cups.
CAF stand for "Caffeinated As *****&", you get it :D
It is good stuff, and leaves no aftertaste in my mouth, and I also like supporting a veteran and the company he started.
They do make beans too I could grind, but I have not tried them yet.
I also sometimes use the Aeropress at home, but if I am in a hurry, the Keurig is very convenient to use.

But for camping I am now liking the Aeropress/Hario setup, and the Overland Coffee brand.
They also have pour over pouches, but I have not tried them, as I am very satisfied with the Aeropress for now.
I also use a JavaPress burr manual hand crank grinder to grind up the coffee fresh.

So lets here what you are currently using now to make that enjoyable cup of coffee when out in nature and away from the city/work life.

 

surf.runner

Member
Cactusjk - it’s a Hario Kettle. That gooseneck spout is key for great control over pour over coffee.

If you have access to electricity, I also recommend the Bonavita electric kettle. Same thing but you can dial it in to a specific temp.

I’d post some links but I haven’t racked up enough activity to have that permission on my account yet.
 

surf.runner

Member
In LGRT's breakfast post coffee was mentioned later in the thread, but I did not want to clog it up since the thread was mainly about food.
So what are you using for making coffee when camping, and what kind?

I use to use a French press when camping, as I also used one at home too.
But they are kind of hard to clean, and use a lot of water.
I have seen the pour overs that are out now that are based on a very old concept of the Melitta pour overs that my parents were using back in the 70s.
I have not tried one.

Last year there was a HUGE thread over on IH8MUD's camping section about camp coffee, and I kept seeing the Aeropress coffee maker popping up.
I decided to buy one last winter, and I liked it so much I bought a second one just to keep in the chuckbox.
There is a little mess leftover, but pretty easy to clean by rinsing with the leftover water from the Hario pot I use to boil the water with.
Yes, I have two of them too, one for home, one for the chuckbox :D
You can see it on the right burner on my stove.

Now as far as coffee goes, I got flipped crap on another site I will not mention, but I think you know the site.
All they do in the thread there is cut down others to make themselves seem better than others.
They even cut down my Outdoor X4 mug :D
I happen to like the Overland Coffee Company "Expedition blend" coffee as seen in the picture below.
It has a bit of chocolate and cherry in it, and it suits me fine.
They also cut down another brand I use at home, but I did not mention, they just talked about it.
That is Black Rifle Coffee, and at home and work I use a Keurig coffee maker, and I use Black Rifle's CAF K-Cups.
CAF stand for "Caffeinated As *****&", you get it :D
It is good stuff, and leaves no aftertaste in my mouth, and I also like supporting a veteran and the company he started.
They do make beans too I could grind, but I have not tried them yet.
I also sometimes use the Aeropress at home, but if I am in a hurry, the Keurig is very convenient to use.

But for camping I am now liking the Aeropress/Hario setup, and the Overland Coffee brand.
They also have pour over pouches, but I have not tried them, as I am very satisfied with the Aeropress for now.
I also use a JavaPress burr manual hand crank grinder to grind up the coffee fresh.

So lets here what you are currently using now to make that enjoyable cup of coffee when out in nature and away from the city/work life.

I’ve been using close to that same setup twice a day for the last 7 years.

I’m now on my second aero press because I literally wore the first one out with I’m guessing over 3000 uses. (I could have just replaced the rubber gasket but I thought it it time to retire the first one)

I hand grind my coffee beans each time using a brass Zassenhaus Havana Turkish grinder. Though my wofe’s Keurig is 5 feet away, I literally find that the work that I put into each cup gets me out of mindless coffee consumption mode and I can savor the cup more.

My go to roasters are anything I can find locally: Verve, Copa Vida, 10 Speed...or my own Home roast (which is nowhere close to as good as the pros)

I also use a reusable disc...however, my only complaint is that it seems a mm or two smaller than the paper so occasionally I’ll have coffee leak out the sode as I press. Worth it for me to cut down on the waste.

Great to see another Aeropress user! Crazy that it’s the same guy who invented the Aerobie frisbee.

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