Weight

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
Here, let me quote myself for anyone in the room that still thinks GVWR is solely based upon equipment here in the USA...

All far points, but the biggest factor in dictating GVWR for pickups has everything to do with licensing and taxes.
This is why you see so many legit full size trucks with a 9900lb GVWR.

My 2011 superduty is one of them. Add up the actual axle ratings, and you are pushing 14,000lbs.
Keep it below 10k and you are in the sweet spot.

Above that, things get dicey.

 

billiebob

Well-known member
In the event of an accident, it may come into consideration, but I think that's likely to be the exception more often than the rule.
oh no, that is the rule. first thing is look for obvious violations including bald tires
driving a tow truck when we pull a car out of the ditch in the winter, job one is see if it has winter tires
 

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
And? It's still rated to tow and haul less than an F150 with a 9.75". Evidently that extra 3/4" of ring gear is for nothing...hahaha.

What's hilarious is my measley and inferior SuperCrew F150 with the tiny "Super 8.8" rear end has a higher payload rating than the vast majority of crew cab Tundras.
That's exactly my point. And many others have missed it as well, some likely on purpose due to the OMG ToyVSDomestic BS
The actual capacity of said axles is NOT the rating you reference.

Do you seriously think an axle with a larger ring gear, larger pinion, larger bearings, thicker axle shaft, etc, etc, ISNT tougher?
Now, Im not saying that the Tundra axle does have larger everything, but Id be willing to bet it does, simply by looking at the ring gear.
Otherwise, why would Toyota even bother? Certainly not for bragging rights over axle ratings, as you said yourself they are lower :ROFLMAO:

GVWR is a rating. GAWR is a rating. Payload is a rating. Tow capacity is a rating.
All of which is dictated by what? The MFG of the truck, not the components in play.

All back to my original comment. Toyota ratings have typically been much more conservative.
 

john61ct

Adventurer
The defacto law in the US for non-commercial use is the fact that an insurance company can decline to pay if you are way over.

They may not often do that except in million dollar liability payouts, but it can happen
 
D

Deleted member 9101

Guest
That's exactly my point. And many others have missed it as well, some likely on purpose due to the OMG ToyVSDomestic BS
The actual capacity of said axles is NOT the rating you reference.

Do you seriously think an axle with a larger ring gear, larger pinion, larger bearings, thicker axle shaft, etc, etc, ISNT tougher?
Now, Im not saying that the Tundra axle does have larger everything, but Id be willing to bet it does, simply by looking at the ring gear.
Otherwise, why would Toyota even bother? Certainly not for bragging rights over axle ratings, as you said yourself they are lower :ROFLMAO:

GVWR is a rating. GAWR is a rating. Payload is a rating. Tow capacity is a rating.
All of which is dictated by what? The MFG of the truck, not the components in play.

All back to my original comment. Toyota ratings have typically been much more conservative.

On that note, Ford now makes 3 different versions of the 9.75" rear end. They are each rated differently and so are the trucks they come with.
 

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
On that note, Ford now makes 3 different versions of the 9.75" rear end. They are each rated differently and so are the trucks they come with.
3 versions? I know there have been many revisions/improvements over the years for essentially every axle under an F-series, but I'm not aware of any different versions.
And nearly every axle is listed with a different tow rating depending upon the gear ratio. This isn't the silly 3/4 float axle is it? I'm not terribly familiar with the 9.75.
 

Ducstrom

Well-known member
GVWR is a manufacturer rating. GAWR and GCWR is more important from a legal stand point. I haven't found a law that address' non commercial vehicles being over GVWR.
They do in BC:
Section 16 for truck campers.

And:
[/URL]
Addresses overloaded vehicles.

I have seen (recently) an RV trailer being pulled by an elderly couple in an SUV, that was obviously over weight, pulled over on the side of the road by two CVSE officers in northern BC.
 

Ducstrom

Well-known member
To me the whole premise doesn't make sense - the primary reasons to carry insurance is to protect you from claims against you due to your own negligence. Your insurance will cover you if you are speeding, and drunk, while texting, and cause an accident.
I am not sure about the other reasons you state, but in BC you can 100% void your insurance driving drunk.
Last paragraph under the "Price of impaired driving" section.
 
D

Deleted member 9101

Guest
3 versions? I know there have been many revisions/improvements over the years for essentially every axle under an F-series, but I'm not aware of any different versions.
And nearly every axle is listed with a different tow rating depending upon the gear ratio. This isn't the silly 3/4 float axle is it? I'm not terribly familiar with the 9.75.

Yep...they make the regular 9.75, the 9.75 with thicker axle tubes, and then the 9.75 semi floater that's in the max tow trucks. That's how they got a 14k tow rating for 2021.

In years prior there were 2 versions, the difference being the axle tube thickness.
 

tacollie

Glamper
They do in BC:
Section 16 for truck campers.

And:
[/URL]
Addresses overloaded vehicles.

I have seen (recently) an RV trailer being pulled by an elderly couple in an SUV, that was obviously over weight, pulled over on the side of the road by two CVSE officers in northern BC.
That's a good point. In the US laws are pretty laid back for GVWR. Outside of the US is a different story.
 

billiebob

Well-known member
I haven't found a law that address' non commercial vehicles being over GVWR.
The fact it is rarely enforced does not mean it is legal.

Same with mudflaps must extend to the wheel centerline.
Fenders mus fully cover the tires.
Don't block the license plate.
Or the tail lights.

Hundreds of vehicle regulations are ignored but they exist.
 

tacollie

Glamper
The fact it is rarely enforced does not mean it is legal.

Same with mudflaps must extend to the wheel centerline.
Fenders mus fully cover the tires.
Don't block the license plate.
Or the tail lights.

Hundreds of vehicle regulations are ignored but they exist.
I haven't been able to find a law in my state for non commercial. I found them for GAWR and GCWR for commercial vehicles. There is lots of info for commercial vehicles. Even commercial vehicles aren't regulated by gross weight. They go by axle ratings.

In the US GVWR is used as a manufacturer classification. I don't think a pop-up is a good idea on a Tacoma. On a Power Wagon it doesn't bother me. The funny thing is my 2002 Tacoma had similar payload to a Power Wagon. The axle ratings differed by almost 3000lbs!
 

Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
GVWR is a rating. GAWR is a rating. Payload is a rating. Tow capacity is a rating.
All of which is dictated by what? The MFG of the truck, not the components in play.
Yes, "but".

While a MFG can opt to down-rate a rating for marketing/legal/tax purposes, they'd be straight-ass stupid to over-spec the rating based on the components. In other words, there are plenty of trucks out there that can likely safely haul more payload than what's on the door sticker, but there are also plenty of trucks where the GVWR is meaningful and a correct representation of the limits of the equipment.

My nominally 8-passenger van, for example, has a 6100lb GVWR and a 3100lb GAWR in the rear. That rear axle is an Astro/Safari-specific (wide) version of the GM 7-5/8" 10-bolt. For all practical purposes, I'm running the rearend from a Camaro. There's no amount of specmanship that's going to make that thing safely haul 3400+ lbs over the rear suspension.
 

Huffy

Observer
My 02' I own a older 2002 super duty and a newer 2016 F150 with very similar capacity and tow ratings. There is no comparison between the trucks. The SD at rated loads feels solid and secure for both bed loads and towing. The 150 is taxed at 1/2 to 3/4 of its rated loads. Full capacity loads are borderline scary. Both are great trucks but overloading either is no beauno, especially the 150. My thoughts are since everyone GM, Ford, Ram, Taco, competes in the 1500 class I suspect allmost all 1500s are similarly challanged. Yes, I have owned a 1500HD (Chevy and Ford), a little better but not much. Your life and family is worth more than a overloaded truck, get the right rig and enjoy.
 

Thinman

Well-known member
I hear a lot, in general, some say "changing suspension does not change GVWR..." or something to that effect.

If that were true, wouldn't a Power Wagon rate the same as a Tradesman 2500 rather then much lower? They list as 1/2 the payload. Same chassis & brakes I believe.
 

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